hxl-10k_20161231.htm

 

 

 

 

UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D. C. 20549

 

FORM 10–K

 

ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the Fiscal Year Ended December 31, 2016

or

Transition Report Pursuant to Section 13 or 15 (d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934

For the transition period from                    to                    

Commission File Number 1-8472

 

Hexcel Corporation

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

 

 

Delaware

 

94-1109521

(State of Incorporation)

 

(I.R.S. Employer Identification No.)

281 Tresser Boulevard

Stamford, Connecticut 06901

(Address of principal executive offices and zip code)

Registrant’s telephone number, including area code: (203) 969-0666

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:

 

Title of each class

 

Name of each exchange on which registered

COMMON STOCK

 

NEW YORK STOCK EXCHANGE

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act: None

 

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act.    Yes      No  

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act.    Yes      No  

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.    Yes      No  

Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of registrant’s knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K.  

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files).    Yes      No  

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.

 

Large accelerated filer 

 

Accelerated filer 

 

 

 

Non-accelerated filer 

 

Smaller reporting company 

(Do not check if a smaller reporting company)

 

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Act).    Yes      No  

The aggregate market value of the registrant’s common stock held by non-affiliates was $3,823,178,724 based on the reported last sale price of common stock on June 30, 2016, which is the last business day of the registrant’s most recently completed second fiscal quarter.

The number of shares outstanding of each of the registrant’s classes of common stock, as of the latest practicable date.

 

Class

 

Outstanding as of January 31, 2017

COMMON STOCK

 

91,508,774

Documents Incorporated by Reference:

Proxy Statement for Annual Meeting of Stockholders (to the extent specified herein) — Part III.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

PART I

 

 

ITEM 1. Business.

General Development of Business

Hexcel Corporation, founded in 1946, was incorporated in California in 1948, and reincorporated in Delaware in 1983. Hexcel Corporation and its subsidiaries (herein referred to as “Hexcel”, “the Company”, “we”, “us”, or “our”), is a leading advanced composites company. We develop, manufacture, and market lightweight, high-performance structural materials, including carbon fibers, specialty reinforcements, prepregs and other fiber-reinforced matrix materials, honeycomb, adhesives, engineered honeycomb and composite structures, for use in Commercial Aerospace, Space & Defense and Industrial markets. Our products are used in a wide variety of end applications, such as commercial and military aircraft, space launch vehicles and satellites, wind turbine blades, automotive, recreational products and other industrial applications.

We serve international markets through manufacturing facilities, sales offices and representatives located in the Americas, Asia Pacific, Europe, Russia and Africa.

We are also a partner in a joint venture in Malaysia, which manufactures composite structures for Commercial Aerospace applications.

On January 5, 2016, we acquired the remaining 50% interest in Formax, which specializes in lightweight multi-axial fabrics. In 2016, we also made $30 million of investments including acquiring an interest in Oxford Performance Materials (“OPM”) for $15.0 million. OPM produces thermoplastic, carbon fiber reinforced 3D printed parts primarily for Commercial Aerospace and Space and Defense applications. We also issued an 8% convertible secured promissory note to Luminati Aerospace LLC (“Luminati”), in the amount of $10 million. Luminati is an aerospace technology company focusing on research, development, testing, and manufacturing of next generation solar-electric unmanned aerial vehicles, or UAVs. Lastly, we invested $5 million in Carbon Conversions Incorporated (“CCI”). CCI is a leader in carbon fiber recycling and repurposing.    

Narrative Description of Business and Segments

We are a manufacturer of products within a single industry: Advanced Composites. Hexcel has two reportable segments: Composite Materials and Engineered Products. The Composite Materials segment is comprised of our carbon fiber, specialty reinforcements, resins, prepregs and other fiber-reinforced matrix materials, and honeycomb core product lines. The Engineered Products segment is comprised of lightweight high strength composite structures, molded components, engineered core and honeycomb products with added functionality.

The following summaries describe the ongoing activities related to the Composite Materials and Engineered Products segments as of December 31, 2016.

Composite Materials

The Composite Materials segment manufactures and markets carbon fibers, fabrics and specialty reinforcements, prepregs and other fiber-reinforced matrix materials, structural adhesives, honeycomb, molding compounds, tooling materials, polyurethane systems and laminates that are incorporated into many applications, including military and commercial aircraft, wind turbine blades, recreational products, transport (cars, boats, trains) and other industrial applications.

 

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The following table identifies the principal products and examples of the primary end-uses from the Composite Materials segment:

 

SEGMENT

 

PRODUCTS

 

PRIMARY END-USES

COMPOSITE MATERIALS

 

Carbon Fibers

 

        Raw materials for prepregs, fabrics and specialty reinforcements

        Filament winding for various aerospace, defense and industrial applications

 

 

 

 

 

Fabrics, Multi-axials and Specialty Reinforcements

 

        Raw materials for prepregs and honeycomb

        Composites and components used in aerospace, defense, wind energy, automotive, recreation, marine and other industrial applications

 

 

 

 

 

Prepregs, Other Fiber-Reinforced Matrix Materials and Resins

 

        Composite structures

        Commercial and military aircraft components

●        Satellites and launchers

●        Aero-engines

        Wind turbine and helicopter blades

        Cars, boats and trains

        Skis, snowboards, bicycles and hockey sticks

 

 

 

 

 

Structural Adhesives

 

        Bonding of metals, honeycomb and composite materials

 

 

 

 

 

Honeycomb

 

●        Composite structures and interiors

●        Impact and shock absorption systems

●        Helicopter blades

Carbon Fibers: HexTow® carbon fibers are manufactured for sale to third-party customers as well as for our own use in manufacturing certain reinforcements and composite materials. Carbon fibers are also woven into carbon fabrics, used as reinforcement in conjunction with a resin matrix to produce pre-impregnated composite materials (referred to as “prepregs”). Carbon fiber is also used in filament winding to produce finished composite components. Key product applications include structural components for commercial and military aircraft, space launch vehicles, and certain other applications such as recreational and industrial equipment.

Fabrics, Multi-axials and Specialty Reinforcements: HexForce® fabrics, multiaxials and specialty reinforcements are made from a variety of fibers, including carbon, glass, aramid and other high strength polymers, quartz, ceramic and other specialty fibers. These reinforcements are used in the production of prepregs and other matrix materials for third-party customers as well as for our own use. They are also used in the manufacture of a variety of industrial and recreational products such as wind energy blades, automotive components, oil exploration and production equipment, boats, surfboards, skis and other sporting goods equipment.  

Prepregs: HexPly® prepregs are manufactured for sale to third-party customers and for internal use by our Engineered Products segment in manufacturing composite laminates and monolithic structures.  Prepregs are used in primary and secondary structural aerospace applications such as wing components, horizontal and vertical stabilizer components, fairings, radomes and engine fan blades and cases, engine nacelles as well as overhead storage bins and other interior components.   They are also used in many of the industrial and recreational products noted above.  Prepregs are manufactured by combining high-performance reinforcement fabrics or unidirectional fibers with a resin matrix to form a composite material that, when cured, has exceptional structural properties not present in either of the constituent materials.  Prepregs are applied via hand layup, automatic tape layup and advanced fiber placement to produce finished composite components.  Prepreg reinforcements include glass, carbon, aramid, quartz, ceramic and other specialty fibers. Resin matrices include bismaleimide, cyanate ester, epoxy, phenolic, polyimide and other specialty resins.

Other Fiber-Reinforced Matrix Materials: Fiber reinforced matrix developments include HexMC®, a form of quasi-isotropic carbon fiber prepreg that enables small to medium sized, complex-shaped, composite components to be mass produced. HexTool® is a specialized form of HexMC® for use in the cost-effective construction of high temperature resistant composite tooling. HexFIT® film infusion material is a product that combines resin films and dry fiber reinforcements to save lay-up time in production and enables the manufacture of large contoured composite structures, such as wind turbine blades.

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Resins: HexFlow® polymer matrix materials are sold in liquid and film form for use in direct process manufacturing of composite parts. Resins can be combined with fiber reinforcements in manufacturing processes such as resin transfer molding (“RTM”), resin film infusion (“RFI”) or vacuum assisted resin transfer molding (“VARTM”) to produce high quality composite components for both aerospace and industrial applications, without the need for customer investment in autoclaves.

Structural Adhesives: We manufacture and market a comprehensive range of Redux® film and paste adhesives. These structural adhesives, which bond metal to metal and composites and honeycomb structures, are used in the aerospace industry and for many industrial applications.

Honeycomb: HexWeb® honeycomb is a lightweight, cellular structure generally composed of a sheet of nested hexagonal cells. It can also be manufactured in over-expanded and asymmetric cell configurations to meet special design requirements such as contours or complex curvatures. Honeycomb is primarily used as a lightweight core material and acts as a highly efficient energy absorber. When sandwiched between composite or metallic facing skins, honeycomb significantly increases the stiffness of the structure, while adding very little weight.

We produce honeycomb from a number of metallic and non-metallic materials. Most metallic honeycomb is made from aluminum and is available in a selection of alloys, cell sizes and dimensions. Non-metallic materials used in the manufacture of honeycomb include fiberglass, carbon fiber, thermoplastics, non-flammable aramid papers, aramid fiber and other specialty materials.

We sell honeycomb as standard blocks and in slices cut from a block. Honeycomb is also used in Acousti-Cap® where a non-metallic, permeable cap material is embedded into honeycomb core that is used in aircraft engine nacelles to dramatically reduce noise during takeoff and landing without adding a structural weight penalty. Aerospace is the largest market for honeycomb products. In addition, we produce honeycomb for our Engineered Products segment for use in manufacturing finished parts for airframe Original Equipment Manufacturers (“OEMs”).

In September 2014, the Company announced it would expand its carbon fiber capacity through the addition of new precursor and carbon fiber lines in Roussillon, France. Construction will be completed by the end of 2017 and qualifications will be completed in 2018. The following table identifies the key customers and the major manufacturing facilities of the Composite Materials segment:

 

COMPOSITE MATERIALS

KEY CUSTOMERS

Aernnova

 

Daher

 

Sikorsky, a Lockheed Martin Company

Airbus

 

Embraer

 

Solvay

AVIC

 

FACC

 

Spirit Aerosystems

Bell

 

General Electric

 

Textron

BMW

 

GKN

 

Toray

The Boeing Company

 

Leonardo

 

Trek

Bombardier

 

Nordam

 

Triumph

CFAN

 

Northrop Grumman

 

United Technologies

CFM International

 

Orbital ATK

 

Vestas

CTRM Aero Composites

 

Safran

 

Zodiac

 

 MAJOR MANUFACTURING FACILITIES

Casa Grande, Arizona

 

Neumarkt, Austria

Dagneux, France

 

Parla, Spain

Decatur, Alabama

 

Salt Lake City, Utah

Duxford, England

 

Seguin, Texas

Illescas, Spain

 

Stade, Germany

Leicester, England

 

Tianjin, China

Les Avenieres, France

 

Windsor, Colorado

Nantes, France

 

 

Net sales for the Composite Materials segment to third-party customers were $1,610 million in 2016, $1,459 million in 2015 and $1,421 million in 2014, which represented about 78% to 80%, of our net sales each year. Net sales for composite materials are highly dependent upon the number of large commercial aircraft produced as further discussed under the captions “Significant Customers”, “Markets” and “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations”. In addition, about 5% of our total production of composite materials in 2016 was used internally by the Engineered Products segment.

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Engineered Products

The Engineered Products segment manufactures and markets composite structures and precision machined honeycomb parts primarily for use in the aerospace industry. Composite structures are manufactured from a variety of composite and other materials, including prepregs, honeycomb, structural adhesives and advanced molding materials, using such manufacturing processes as autoclave processing, multi-axis numerically controlled machining, heat forming, compression molding and other composite manufacturing techniques.

The following table identifies the principal products and examples of the primary end-uses from the Engineered Products segment:

 

SEGMENT

 

PRODUCTS

 

PRIMARY END-USES

ENGINEERED PRODUCTS

 

Composite Structures

 

        Aircraft structures and finished aircraft components, including wing to body fairings, wing panels, flight deck panels, door liners, helicopter blades, spars and tip caps

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Engineered Honeycomb

 

        Aircraft structural sub-components and semi-finished components used in helicopter blades, engine nacelles, and aircraft surfaces (flaps, wings, elevators and fairings)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

HexMC® molded

composite parts

 

        Complex geometric parts for commercial aircraft to replace traditionally metal parts including window frames, primary structure brackets and fittings as well as for certain industrial applications

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

HexTool® Tooling

 

Mold tools made from carbon fiber and high temperature resistant BMI or epoxy resin. Used in the manufacture of composite aircraft structures, providing a lower weight, easier to handle alternative to traditional metal tooling. 

Net sales for the Engineered Products segment to third-party customers were $394 million in 2016, $403 million in 2015, and $435 million in 2014, which represented about 19% to 22% of our net sales each year.

The Engineered Products segment has a 50% ownership interest in a Malaysian joint venture, Aerospace Composites Malaysia Sdn. Bhd. (“ACM”) with Boeing Worldwide Operations Limited. Under the terms of the joint venture agreement, Hexcel and The Boeing Company (“Boeing”) have transferred the manufacture of certain semi-finished composite components to this joint venture. Hexcel purchases the semi-finished composite components from the joint venture, and inspects and performs additional skilled assembly work before delivering them to Boeing. The joint venture also manufactures composite components for other aircraft component manufacturers. ACM had revenue of $58 million in 2016, and $69 million and $64 million in 2015 and 2014, respectively.

 

In January 2016, the Company announced it would expand its global engineered honeycomb capacity by building a manufacturing plant in Casablanca, Morocco. The facility should be operational in the second half of 2017.

The following table identifies the key customers and the major manufacturing facilities of the Engineered Products segment:

 

ENGINEERED PRODUCTS

KEY CUSTOMERS

 

MAJOR
MANUFACTURING FACILITIES

The Boeing Company

 

Burlington, Washington

Bombardier

 

Kent, Washington

CTRM Aero Composites

 

Pottsville, Pennsylvania

General Electric

 

Welkenraedt, Belgium

GKN

 

Alor Setar, Malaysia (JV)

Sikorsky, a Lockheed Martin Company

 

 

Spirit Aerosystems

 

 

United Technologies

 

 

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Financial Information About Segments and Geographic Areas

Financial information and further discussion of our segments and geographic areas, including external sales and long-lived assets, are contained under the caption “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” and in Note 16 to the accompanying consolidated financial statements of this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

Significant Customers

Approximately 41%, 35% and 31% of our 2016, 2015 and 2014 net sales, respectively, were to Airbus and its subcontractors. Of the 41% of overall sales to Airbus and its subcontractors in 2016, 37% related to Commercial Aerospace market applications and 4% related to Space & Defense market applications. Approximately 28%, 31% and 32% of our 2016, 2015 and 2014 net sales, respectively, were to Boeing and related subcontractors. Of the 28% of overall sales to Boeing and its subcontractors in 2016, 26% related to Commercial Aerospace market applications and 2% related to Space & Defense market applications.

Markets

Our products are sold for a broad range of end-uses. The following tables summarize our net sales to third-party customers by market and by geography for each of the three years ended December 31:

 

 

 

2016

 

 

2015

 

 

2014

 

Net Sales by Market

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Commercial Aerospace

 

 

71

%

 

 

69

%

 

 

66

%

Space & Defense

 

 

16

 

 

 

18

 

 

 

20

 

Industrial

 

 

13

 

 

 

13

 

 

 

14

 

Total

 

 

100

%

 

 

100

%

 

 

100

%

Net Sales by Geography (a)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

United States

 

 

48

%

 

 

51

%

 

 

50

%

Europe and China

 

 

52

 

 

 

49

 

 

 

50

 

Total

 

 

100

%

 

 

100

%

 

 

100

%

 

 

(a)

Net sales by geography based on the location in which the product sold was manufactured.

 

 

 

2016

 

 

2015

 

 

2014

 

Net Sales to External Customers (b)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

United States

 

 

42

%

 

 

46

%

 

 

45

%

Europe

 

 

41

 

 

 

37

 

 

 

39

 

All Others

 

 

17

 

 

 

17

 

 

 

16

 

Total

 

 

100

%

 

 

100

%

 

 

100

%

 

 

(b)

Net sales to external customers based on the location to which the product sold was delivered.

Commercial Aerospace

The Commercial Aerospace industry is our largest user of advanced composites. Commercial Aerospace represented 71% of our 2016 net sales. Approximately 89% of these revenues can be identified as sales to Airbus, Boeing and their subcontractors for the production of commercial aircraft. The remaining 11% of these revenues were for regional and business aircraft. The economic benefits airlines can obtain from weight savings in both fuel economy and aircraft range, combined with the design enhancement that comes from the advantages of advanced composites over traditional materials, have caused the industry to be the leader in the use of these materials. While military aircraft and spacecraft have championed the development of these materials, Commercial Aerospace has had the greater production volumes and has commercialized the use of these products. Accordingly, the demand for advanced structural material products is closely correlated to the demand for new commercial aircraft.

The use of advanced composites in Commercial Aerospace is primarily in the manufacture of new commercial aircraft. The aftermarket for these products is very small as many of these materials are designed to last for the life of the aircraft. The demand for new commercial aircraft is driven by two principal factors, the first of which is airline passenger traffic (the number of revenue passenger miles flown by the airlines) which affects the required size of airline fleets. The International Air Transport Association (IATA) estimates 2016 revenue passenger miles were 6.3% higher than 2015. Growth in passenger traffic requires growth in the size of the fleet of commercial aircraft operated by airlines worldwide.

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A second factor, which is less sensitive to the general economy, is the replacement rates for existing aircraft. The rates of retirement of passenger and freight aircraft, resulting mainly from obsolescence, are determined in part by the regulatory requirements established by various civil aviation authorities worldwide as well as public concern regarding aircraft age, safety and noise. These rates may also be affected by the desire of the various airlines to improve operating costs with higher payloads and more fuel-efficient aircraft (which in turn is influenced by the price of fuel) and by reducing maintenance expense. In addition, there is expected to be increasing pressure on airlines to replace their aging fleet with more fuel efficient and quieter aircraft to be more environmentally responsible. When aircraft are retired from commercial airline fleets, they may be converted to cargo freight aircraft or scrapped.

An additional factor that may cause airlines to defer or cancel orders is their ability to obtain financing, including leasing, for new aircraft orders. This will be dependent both upon the financial health of the airline operators, as well as the overall availability of financing in the marketplace.

Each new generation of commercial aircraft has used increasing quantities of advanced composites, replacing metals. This follows the trend previously seen in military fighter aircraft where advanced composites may now exceed 50% of the weight of the airframe. Early versions of commercial jet aircraft, such as the Boeing 707, which was developed in the early 1950’s, contained almost no composite materials. One of the first commercial aircraft to use a meaningful amount of composite materials, the Boeing 767 entered into service in 1983, and was built with an airframe containing approximately 6% composite materials. The airframe of Boeing’s 777 aircraft, which entered service in 1995, is approximately 11% composite. The Airbus A380, which was first delivered in 2007, has approximately 23% composite content by weight. Boeing’s B787, which entered into service in 2011, has a content of more than 50% composite materials by weight. The Airbus A350 XWB (“A350”) which has a composite content of 53% by weight was first delivered in December 2014.  In 2011, both Airbus and Boeing announced new versions of their narrow body aircraft which will have new engines. Airbus’s A320neo had its first customer delivery in January 2016, with 68 planes delivered in 2016 and 4,876 orders in backlog at December 31, 2016. Boeing’s B737 MAX had its first flight on January 29, 2016 and is expected to enter service in 2017.  In 2014, Airbus announced a new version of its A330, the A330neo, which will have new engines, and Boeing announced the B777X, a new version of the B777 with composite wings and new engines.  It is expected that these new aircraft will offer more opportunities for composite materials than their predecessors, as the Commercial Aerospace industry continues to utilize a greater proportion of advanced composite materials with each new generation of aircraft. We refer to this steady expansion of the use of composites in aircraft as the “secular penetration of composites” as it increases our average sales per airplane over time.

The impact on Hexcel of Airbus and Boeing’s production rate changes is typically influenced by two factors: the mix of aircraft produced and the inventory supply chain effects of increases or reductions in aircraft production. We have products on all Airbus and Boeing planes. The dollar value of our materials varies by aircraft type — twin aisle aircraft use more of our materials than narrow body aircraft and newer designed aircraft use more of our materials than older generations. On average, for established programs, we deliver products into the supply chain about six months prior to aircraft delivery, with a range between one and eighteen months depending on the product. For aircraft that are in the development or ramp-up stage, such as the B737 MAX, A330neo and the B777X, we will have sales as much as several years in advance of the delivery. Increased aircraft deliveries combined with the secular penetration of composites resulted in our Commercial Aerospace revenues increasing, year over year, by approximately 11.1% (11.3% in constant currency) in 2016 and 6% in 2015 and 12% in 2014.

Set forth below are historical aircraft deliveries as announced by Airbus and Boeing:

 

 

 

 

2002

 

2003

 

2004

 

2005

 

2006

 

2007

 

2008

 

2009

 

2010

 

2011

 

2012

 

2013

 

2014

 

2015

 

2016

Airbus

 

 

303

 

305

 

320

 

378

 

434

 

453

 

483

 

498

 

510

 

534

 

588

 

626

 

629

 

635

 

688

Boeing

 

 

381

 

281

 

285

 

290

 

398

 

441

 

375

 

481

 

462

 

477

 

601

 

648

 

723

 

762

 

748

Total

 

 

684

 

586

 

605

 

668

 

832

 

894

 

858

 

979

 

972

 

1,011

 

1,189

 

1,274

 

1,352

 

1,397

 

1,436

Approximately 89% of our Commercial Aerospace revenues can be identified as sales to Airbus, Boeing and their subcontractors for the production of commercial aircraft. Airbus and Boeing combined deliveries in 2016 were 1,436 aircraft, surpassing the previous high of 1,397 in 2015. Based on Airbus and Boeing public estimates, the combined deliveries in 2017 are expected to be just above 2016 levels. In 2016, the combined net orders reported by Airbus and Boeing were for 1,399 planes, bringing their backlog at December 31, 2016 to 12,589 planes or about nine years based on 2016 deliveries. The balance of our Commercial Aerospace sales is related to regional and business aircraft manufacture, and other commercial aircraft applications. These applications also exhibit increasing utilization of composite materials with each new generation of aircraft.

Space & Defense

The Space & Defense market has historically been an innovator in the use of, and source of significant demand for, advanced composites. The aggregate demand by Space & Defense customers is primarily a function of procurement of military aircraft that

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utilize advanced composites by the United States and certain European governments, including both commercial and military helicopters. We are currently qualified to supply materials to a broad range of helicopter, military aircraft and space programs, including the V-22 (Osprey) tilt rotor aircraft, A400M military transport, F-35 (joint strike fighter or JSF), and Blackhawk. No one program accounts for more than 12% of our revenues in this market. The sales that we obtain from these programs will depend upon which are funded and the extent of such funding. Space applications for advanced composites include solid rocket booster cases, fairings and payload doors for launch vehicles, and satellite buss and solar arrays for military and commercial satellites.

Another trend providing positive growth for Hexcel is the further penetration of composites in helicopter blades. Numerous new helicopter programs in development, as well as upgrade or retrofit programs, have an increased reliance on Composite Materials products such as carbon fiber, prepregs, and honeycomb core to improve blade performance. In addition, our Engineered Products segment provides specialty value added services such as machining, sub-assembly, and even full blade manufacturing.

Contracts for military and some commercial programs may contain provisions applicable to both U.S. Government contracts and subcontracts. For example, a prime contractor may flow down a “termination for convenience” clause to materials suppliers such as Hexcel. According to the terms of a contract, we may be subject to U.S. government Federal Acquisition Regulations, the Department of Defense Federal Acquisition Regulations Supplement, and associated procurement regulations.

Industrial  

The revenue for this market includes wind turbine blades, automotive, a wide variety of recreational products and other industrial applications. A number of these applications represent emerging opportunities for our products. In developing new applications, we seek those opportunities where advanced composites technology offers significant benefits to the end user, often applications that demand high engineering performance. Within the Industrial markets, wind energy comprises over 50% of the sales and our primary customer is Vestas Wind Systems A/S.  The Industrial markets also include sales to major end user sub-markets, in order of size based on our 2016 sales: general industrial applications (including those sold through distributors), transportation (e.g., automobiles, mass transit and high-speed rail, and marine applications) and recreational equipment (e.g., skis and snowboards, bicycles and hockey sticks). Our participation in Industrial applications complements our commercial and military aerospace businesses, and in many instances, technology or products now used in aerospace were started in Industrial. We are committed to pursuing the utilization of advanced structural material technology where it can generate significant value and we can maintain a sustainable competitive advantage.

Further discussion of our markets, including certain risks, uncertainties and other factors with respect to “forward-looking statements” about those markets, is contained under the captions “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” and “Risk Factors”.

Backlog

In recent years, our customers have demanded shorter order lead times and “just-in-time” delivery performance. While we have many multi-year contracts with our major aerospace customers, most of these contracts specify the proportion of the customers’ requirements that will be supplied by us and the terms under which the sales will occur, not the specific quantities to be procured. Our Industrial customers have always desired to order their requirements on as short a lead-time as possible. As a result, twelve-month order backlog is not a meaningful trend indicator for us. As noted above, our Commercial Aerospace sales to Airbus and Boeing and their subcontractors accounted for 63% of our total 2016 sales, and they have backlogs of 12,589 airplanes, or nearly nine years based on 2016 deliveries.

Raw Materials and Production Activities

Our manufacturing operations are in many cases vertically integrated. We produce and internally use carbon fibers, industrial fabrics, composite materials and composite structures as well as sell these materials to third-party customers for their use in the manufacture of their products.

We manufacture high performance carbon fiber from polyacrylonitrile precursor (“PAN”). The primary raw material for PAN is acrylonitrile. All of the PAN we produce is for internal carbon fiber production. We consume more than 80% by value of the carbon fiber we produce and sell the remainder of our output to third-party customers. However, as one of the world’s largest consumers of high performance carbon fiber, we also purchase significant quantities of carbon fiber from external sources for our own use. The sources of carbon fiber we can use in any product or application are generally dictated by customer qualifications or certifications. Otherwise, we select a carbon fiber based on performance, price and availability. With the increasing demand for carbon fiber, particularly in aerospace applications, we have tripled our PAN and carbon fiber capacity since 2007 to serve the growing needs of our customers and our own downstream products and we are continuing to expand our capacity to meet our customers’ forecasted

8


 

requirements. After a new production line starts operating, it can take up to a year to be certified for aerospace qualifications. However, these lines can start supplying carbon fiber for many industrial applications within a shorter time period.

We purchase glass yarn from a number of suppliers in the United States, Europe and Asia. We also purchase aramid and high strength fibers which are produced by only a few companies, and during periods of high demand, can be in short supply. In addition, epoxy and other specialty resins, aramid paper and aluminum specialty foils are used in the manufacture of composite products. A number of these products have only one or two sources qualified for use, so an interruption in their supply could disrupt our ability to meet our customer requirements. When entering into multi-year contracts with aerospace customers, we attempt to get back-to-back commitments from key raw material suppliers.

Our manufacturing activities are primarily based on “make-to-order”, or “demand pull” based on customer schedules, and to a lesser extent, “make-to-forecast” production requirements. We coordinate closely with key suppliers in an effort to avoid raw material shortages and excess inventories. However, many of the key raw materials we consume are available from relatively few sources, and in many cases the cost of product qualification makes it impractical to develop multiple sources of supply. The lack of availability of these materials could under certain circumstances have a material adverse effect on our consolidated results of operations.

Research and Technology; Patents and Know-How

Research and Technology (“R&T”) departments support our businesses worldwide. Through R&T activities, we maintain expertise in precursor and carbon fiber, chemical and polymer formulation and curatives, fabric forming and textile architectures, advanced composite structures, process engineering, application development, analysis and testing of composite materials, computational design, and other scientific disciplines related to our worldwide business base.

Our products rely primarily on our expertise in materials science, textiles, process engineering and polymer chemistry. Consistent with market demand, we have been placing more emphasis on higher performing products and cost effective production processes while seeking to improve the consistency of our products and our capital efficiency. Towards this end, we have entered into formal and informal alliances, as well as licensing and teaming arrangements, with several customers, suppliers, external agencies and laboratories. We believe that we possess unique capabilities to design, develop, manufacture and qualify composite materials and structures. We have over 1,450 patents and pending applications worldwide, and have granted technology licenses and patent rights to several third parties primarily in connection with joint ventures and joint development programs. It is our policy to actively enforce our proprietary rights. We believe that the patents and know-how rights currently owned or licensed by Hexcel are adequate for the conduct of our business. We do not believe that our business would be materially affected by the expiration of any single patent or series of related patents, or by the termination of any single license agreement or series of related license agreements.

We spent $46.9 million, $44.3 million and $47.9 million for R&T in 2016, 2015 and 2014, respectively.  Our spending, on a constant currency basis, in 2016 was more than 10% higher than 2015 and in 2015 was about the same as 2014. Our spending on a quarter to quarter basis fluctuates depending upon the amount of new product development and qualification activities, particularly in relation to commercial aircraft applications, that are in progress. These expenditures are expensed as incurred.

Environmental Matters

We are subject to federal, state, local and foreign laws and regulations designed to protect the environment and to regulate the discharge of materials into the environment. We believe that our policies, practices, and procedures are properly designed to prevent unreasonable risk of environmental damage and associated financial liability. To date, environmental control regulations have not had a significant adverse effect on our overall operations.

Our aggregate environmental related accruals at December 31, 2016 and 2015 were $3.2 million and $2.9 million, respectively. As of December 31, 2016 and December 31, 2015, $1.4 million and $1.1 million, respectively, were included in “Other current accrued liabilities”, with the remainder included in “Other non-current liabilities”. As related to certain of our environmental matters, our accruals were estimated at the low end of a range of possible outcomes since there was no better point within the range. If we had accrued, for those sites where we are able to estimate our liability, at the high end of the range of possible outcomes, our accruals would have been $16 million higher at December 31, 2016 and 2015. Environmental remediation spending charged directly to our reserve balance for 2016, 2015 and 2014, was $0.8 million, $2.6 million and $4.9 million, respectively. In addition, our operating costs relating to environmental compliance were $10.1 million, $10.7 million and $14.2 million, for 2016, 2015, and 2014, respectively, and were charged directly to expense. Capital expenditures for environmental matters approximated $13.2 million, $7.1 million and $7.3 million for 2016, 2015 and 2014 respectively.

These accruals can change significantly from period to period due to such factors as additional information on the nature or extent of contamination, the methods of remediation required, changes in the apportionment of costs among responsible parties and other actions by governmental agencies or private parties, as well as the impact, if any, of Hexcel being named in a new matter. A

9


 

discussion of environmental matters is contained in Item 3, “Legal Proceedings,” and in Note 13 to the accompanying consolidated financial statements included in this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

Sales and Marketing

A staff of salaried marketing managers, product managers and sales personnel, sell and market our products directly to customers worldwide. We also use independent distributors and manufacturer representatives for certain products, markets and regions. In addition, we operate various sales representation offices in the Americas, Europe, Asia Pacific, Russia and Africa.

Competition

In the production and sale of advanced composites, we compete with a number of U.S. and international companies on a worldwide basis. The broad markets for composites are highly competitive, and we have focused on both specific submarkets and specialty products within markets. In addition to competing directly with companies offering similar products, we compete with producers of substitute composites such as structural foam, infusion technology, wood and metal. Depending upon the material and markets, relevant competitive factors include approvals, database of usage, technology, product performance, delivery, service, price, customer preference for sole sourcing and customer preferred processes.

Employees

As of December 31, 2016, we employed 6,155 full-time employees and contract workers, 3,346 in the United States and 2,809 in other countries. Of the 6,155 full-time employees, approximately 17% were represented by collective bargaining agreements. We believe that our relations with employees and unions are good. The number of full-time employees and contract workers as of December 31, 2015 and 2014 was 5,897 and 5,663, respectively.

Other Information

Our internet website is www.hexcel.com. We make available, free of charge through our website, our Form 10-Ks, 10-Qs and 8-Ks, and any amendments to these forms, as soon as reasonably practicable after filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission.

 

 

ITEM 1A. Risk Factors

An investment in our common stock or debt securities involves risks and uncertainties. You should consider the following risk factors carefully, in addition to the other information contained in this Annual Report on Form 10-K, before deciding to purchase any of our securities.

The markets in which we operate can be cyclical, and downturns in them may adversely affect the results of our operations.

Some of the markets in which we operate have been, to varying degrees, cyclical and have experienced downturns. A downturn in these markets could occur at any time as a result of events that are industry specific or macroeconomic and in the event of a downturn; we have no way of knowing if, when and to what extent there might be a recovery. Any deterioration in any of the cyclical markets we serve could adversely affect our financial performance and operating results.

At December 31, 2016, Airbus and Boeing had a combined backlog of 12,589 aircraft or nearly nine years of production at 2016 delivery rates. To the extent any significant deferrals, cancellations or reduction in demand results in decreased aircraft build rates, it would reduce net sales for our Commercial Aerospace products and as a result reduce our operating income. Approximately 71% of our net sales for 2016 were derived from sales to the Commercial Aerospace industry, which includes 89% from Airbus and Boeing aircraft and 11% from regional and business aircraft. Reductions in demand for commercial aircraft or a delay in deliveries could result from many factors, including delays in the startup or ramp-up of new programs, changes in the propensity for the general public to travel by air (including as a result of terrorist events and any subsequent military response), a significant change in the cost of aviation fuel, a change in technology resulting in the use of alternative materials, consolidation and liquidation of airlines, availability of funding for new aircraft purchases or leases, inventory corrections or disruptions throughout the supply chain and slower macroeconomic growth.

10


 

The A350 had its first customer delivery in December 2014. Our content per plane is approximately $5 million and it is our largest program. We expect sales of $600 million per year when Airbus reaches its projected buildrates of 120 per year. Both Airbus and Boeing have experienced various delays in the start and ramp up of several aircraft programs, including the A380, B787, B747-8, A400M, and A350. In the past, these have delayed our expected growth or our effective utilization of capacity installed for such growth. Future delays in these or other major new customer programs could similarly impact our results.

In addition, our customers continue to emphasize the need for cost reduction or other improvements in contract terms throughout the supply chain. In response to these pressures, we may be required to accept increased risk or face the prospects of margin compression on some products in the future. Where possible, we seek to offset or mitigate the impact of such pressures through productivity and performance improvements, index clauses, currency hedging and other actions.

A significant decline in business with Airbus, Boeing, Vestas, or other significant customers could materially impact our business, operating results, prospects and financial condition.

We have concentrated customers in the Commercial Aerospace and wind energy markets. In the Commercial Aerospace market, approximately 89%, and in the Space & Defense market, approximately 33%, of our 2016 net sales were made to Airbus and Boeing and their related subcontractors. For the years ended December 31, 2016 and December 31, 2015, approximately 41% and 35% of our total consolidated net sales, respectively, were to Airbus, and its related subcontractors and approximately 28% and 31% of our total consolidated net sales were to Boeing and its related subcontractors, respectively. In the wind energy market, our primary customer is Vestas. Significant changes in the demand for our customers’ end products, program delays, the share of their requirements that is awarded to us or changes in the design or materials used to construct their products could result in a significant loss of business with these customers. The loss of, or significant reduction in purchases by Airbus, Boeing and Vestas or any of our other significant customers could materially impair our business, operating results, prospects and financial condition. The level of purchases by our customers is often affected by events beyond their control, including general economic conditions, demand for their products, disruptions in deliveries, business disruptions, strikes and other factors.

A decrease in supply, interruptions at key facilities or an increase in cost of raw materials could result in a material decline in our profitability.

Our profitability depends largely on the price and continuity of supply of raw materials, which may be supplied through a sole source or a limited number of sources. We purchase large volumes of raw materials, such as epoxy and phenolic resins, carbon fiber, fiberglass yarn, aluminum foil and aramid paper. Any restrictions on the supply, or an increase in the cost, of our raw materials could significantly reduce our profit margins. Efforts to mitigate restrictions on the supply or price increases of these raw materials by long-term purchase agreements, productivity improvements or by passing cost increases to our customers may not be successful.

The occurrence of material operational problems, including but not limited to failure of, or interruption to, key equipment or natural disasters, or inability to install, staff and qualify necessary capacity, achievement of planned manufacturing improvements, or inability to meet customer specifications, may have a material adverse effect on the productivity and profitability of a particular manufacturing facility. With respect to certain facilities, such events could have a material effect on our company as a whole.

Reductions in space and defense spending could result in a decline in our net sales.

Space and defense production that has occurred in recent years may not be sustained, individual programs important to Hexcel may be cancelled, production may not continue to grow and the increased demand for composite-intensive programs may not continue. In addition, the production of military aircraft depends upon defense budgets and the related demand for defense and related equipment. Approximately 16% of our net sales in 2016 were to the Space & Defense market of which about 85% were related to military programs in the United States and other countries.

We have substantial international operations subject to uncertainties which could affect our operating results.

We believe that revenue from sales outside the U.S. will continue to account for a material portion of our total revenue for the foreseeable future. In 2016, 49% of our production and 58% of our customer sales occurred outside of the United States. Additionally, we have invested significant resources in our international operations and we intend to continue to make such investments in the future. Our international operations are subject to numerous risks, including: (a) general economic and political conditions in the countries where we operate may have an adverse effect on our operations in those countries or not be favorable to our growth strategy; (b) the difficulty of enforcing agreements and collecting receivables through some foreign legal systems; (c) foreign customers may have longer payment cycles than customers in the U.S.; (d) cost of compliance with international trade laws of all of the countries in which we do business, including export control laws, relating to sales and purchases of goods and equipment and transfers of technology; (e) tax rates may vary and foreign earnings may be subject to withholding requirements or the imposition of tariffs, exchange controls or other restrictions; (f) governments may adopt regulations or take other actions that would have a direct or

11


 

indirect adverse impact on our business and market opportunities; and (g) the potential difficulty in enforcing our intellectual property rights in some foreign countries, and the potential for the intellectual property rights of others to affect our ability to sell product in certain markets. Any one of these could adversely affect our financial condition and results of operations.

In addition, fluctuations in currency exchange rates may influence the profitability and cash flows of our business. For example, our European operations sell a portion of the products they produce in U.S. dollars, yet the labor, overhead costs and portions of material costs incurred in the manufacture of those products are primarily denominated in Euros, British pound sterling or U.S. dollars. As a result, the local currency margins of goods manufactured with costs denominated in local currency, yet sold in U.S. dollars, will vary with fluctuations in currency exchange rates, reducing when the U.S. dollar weakens against the Euro and British pound sterling. In addition, the reported U.S. dollar value of the local currency financial statements of our foreign subsidiaries will vary with fluctuations in currency exchange rates. While we enter into currency exchange and hedge agreements from time to time to mitigate these types of fluctuations, we cannot remove all fluctuations or hedge all exposures, and our earnings are impacted by changes in currency exchange rates.

We currently do not have political risk insurance in the countries in which we conduct business. While we carefully consider these risks when evaluating our international operations, we cannot provide assurance that we will not be materially adversely affected as a result of such risks.

We could be adversely affected by environmental and safety requirements.

Our operations require the handling, use, storage and disposal of certain regulated materials and wastes. As a result, we are subject to various laws and regulations pertaining to pollution and protection of the environment, health and safety. These requirements govern, among other things, emissions to air, discharge to waters and the generation, handling, storage, treatment and disposal of waste and remediation of contaminated sites. We have made, and will continue to make, capital and other expenditures in order to comply with these laws and regulations. These laws and regulations are complex, change frequently and could become more stringent in the future.

We have been named as a “potentially responsible party” under the U.S. Superfund law or similar state laws at several sites requiring clean up. These laws generally impose liability for costs to investigate and remediate contamination without regard to fault. Under certain circumstances liability may be joint and several, resulting in one responsible party being held responsible for the entire obligation. Liability may also include damages to natural resources. We have incurred and likely will continue to incur expenses to investigate and clean up certain of our existing and former facilities, for which we believe we have adequate reserves. The ongoing operation of our manufacturing plants also entails environmental risks, and we may incur material costs or liabilities in the future which could adversely affect us. Although most of our properties have been the subject of environmental site assessments, there can be no assurance that all potential instances of soil and groundwater contamination have been identified, even at those sites where assessments have been conducted. Accordingly, we may discover previously unknown environmental conditions and the cost of remediating such conditions may be material. See “Legal Proceedings” below and Note 13 to the consolidated financial statements included elsewhere in this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

In addition, we may be required to comply with evolving environmental, health and safety laws, regulations or requirements that may be adopted or imposed in the future or to address newly discovered information or conditions that require a response. In particular, climate change is receiving increased attention worldwide, which has led to significant legislative and regulatory efforts to limit greenhouse gas emissions. The U.S. Congress has considered climate change-related legislation and may retake the issue in the near future. Specific policy measures could include cap and trade provisions or a carbon tax. The European Union has instituted the Greenhouse Gas Emission Trading System (EU-ETS). Our manufacturing plants use energy, including electricity and natural gas, and some of our plants may in the future emit amounts of greenhouse gas that could be affected by these legislative and regulatory efforts. Potential consequences could include increased energy, transportation and raw material costs and may require the Company to make additional investments in its facilities and equipment or limit our ability to grow.

 

Acquisitions, divestitures, mergers, business combinations or joint ventures by the Company may entail certain operational and financial risks.

Over the past several years we have completed the strategic acquisition of a complementary manufacturing company, Formax (UK) Limited, as well as strategic investments in companies like Oxford Performance Materials and Carbon Conversions Inc. We expect to continue to explore complementary acquisitions, investments and joint ventures and may also pursue divestures of business lines that do not fit with our core strategy. We may also engage in further vertical integration. From time to time, we have evaluated, and we expect that we will continue to evaluate, possible acquisition, investment, joint venture and/or divestiture transactions. At any given time we may be engaged in discussions or negotiations with respect to these types of activities or may have entered into non-

12


 

binding letters of intent. However, we may face competition for attractive targets and may not be able to source appropriate acquisition targets at prices acceptable to us, if at all. In addition, these types of transactions may require significant liquidity, which may not be available on terms favorable to us, or at all. There can be no assurance that we will realize the intended benefits from such transactions or that such transactions will not present risks that could result in increased expenditures and could materially adversely affect our revenues and profitability.

Our forward-looking statements and projections may turn out to be inaccurate.

This Form 10-K includes forward-looking statements within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. These statements relate to analyses and other information that are based on forecasts of future results and estimates of amounts not yet determinable. These statements also relate to future prospects, developments and business strategies. These forward-looking statements are identified by their use of terms and phrases such as “anticipate”, “believe”, “could”, “estimate”, “expect”, “intend”, “may”, “plan”, “predict”, “project”, “should”, “would”, “will” and similar terms and phrases, including references to assumptions. Such statements are based on current expectations, are inherently uncertain, and are subject to changing assumptions.

Such forward-looking statements include, but are not limited to: (a) the estimates and expectations based on aircraft production rates made publicly available by Airbus, Boeing and others; (b) the revenues we may generate from an aircraft model or program; (c) the impact of the possible push-out in deliveries of the Airbus and Boeing backlog and the impact of delays in the startup or ramp-up of new aircraft programs or the final Hexcel composite material content once the design and material selection has been completed; (d) expectations of composite content on new commercial aircraft programs and our share of those requirements; (e) expectations of growth in revenues from space and defense applications, including whether certain programs might be curtailed or discontinued; (f) expectations regarding growth in sales for wind energy, recreation, automotive and other industrial applications; (g) expectations regarding working capital trends and expenditures; (h) expectations as to the level of capital expenditures and when we will complete the construction and qualification of capacity expansions; (i) our ability to maintain and improve margins in light of the ramp-up of capacity and new facilities and the current economic environment; (j) the outcome of legal matters; (k) our projections regarding the realizability of net operating loss and tax credit carryforwards; and (l) the impact of various market risks, including fluctuations in interest rates, currency exchange rates, environmental regulations and tax codes, fluctuations in commodity prices, and fluctuations in the market price of our common stock, the impact of work stoppages or other labor disruptions and the impact of the above factors on our expectations of 2017 financial results and beyond. In addition, actual results may differ materially from the results anticipated in the forward looking statements due to a variety of factors, including but not limited to changing market conditions, increased competition, product mix, inability to achieve planned manufacturing improvements or to meet customer specifications, cost reductions and capacity additions, and conditions in the financial markets.

Such forward-looking statements involve known and unknown risks, uncertainties and other factors that may cause actual results to be materially different.  Such factors include, but are not limited to, the following: changes in general economic and business conditions; changes in current pricing and cost levels; changes in political, social and economic conditions and local regulations; foreign currency fluctuations; changes in aerospace delivery rates; reductions in sales to any significant customers, particularly Airbus, Boeing or Vestas; changes in sales mix; changes in government defense procurement budgets; changes in military aerospace programs technology; industry capacity; competition; disruptions of established supply channels, particularly where raw materials are obtained from a single or limited number of sources and cannot be substituted by unqualified alternatives; manufacturing capacity constraints; uncertainty regarding the likely exit of the U.K. from the European Union; and unforeseen vulnerability of our network and systems to interruptions or failures.

If one or more of these risks or uncertainties materialize, or if underlying assumptions prove incorrect, actual results may vary materially from those expected, estimated or projected. In addition to other factors that affect our operating results and financial position, neither past financial performance nor our expectations should be considered reliable indicators of future performance. Investors should not use historical trends to anticipate results or trends in future periods. Further, our stock price is subject to volatility. Any of the factors discussed above could have an adverse impact on the price of our securities. In addition, failure of sales or income in any quarter to meet the investment community’s expectations, as well as broader market trends, can have an adverse impact on the price of our securities. We do not undertake an obligation to update our forward-looking statements or risk factors to reflect future events or circumstances.

 

 

 

ITEM 1B. Unresolved Staff Comments

None.

 

 

 

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ITEM 2. Properties

We own and lease manufacturing facilities and sales offices located throughout the United States and in other countries, as noted below. The corporate offices and principal corporate support activities are located in leased facilities in Stamford, Connecticut. Our research and technology administration and principal laboratories are located in Dublin, California; Duxford, England; Les Avenieres, France; Salt Lake City, Utah and Decatur, Alabama.

The following table lists our manufacturing facilities by geographic location, related segment, and principal products manufactured. This table does not include manufacturing facilities owned by our joint venture.

Manufacturing Facilities

 

Facility Location

 

Segment

 

Principal Products

United States:

 

 

 

 

Burlington, Washington

 

Engineered Products

 

Engineered Honeycomb Parts

Casa Grande, Arizona

 

Composite Materials

 

Honeycomb and Honeycomb Parts

Decatur, Alabama

 

Composite Materials

 

PAN Precursor (used to produce Carbon Fibers)

Kent, Washington

 

Engineered Products

 

Composite structures

Pottsville, Pennsylvania

 

Engineered Products

 

Engineered Honeycomb Parts

Salt Lake City, Utah

 

Composite Materials

 

Carbon Fibers; Prepregs

Seguin, Texas

 

Composite Materials

 

Industrial Fabrics; Specialty Reinforcements

Windsor, Colorado

 

Composite Materials

 

Prepregs

International:

 

 

 

 

Casablanca, Morocco

 

Engineered Products

 

Engineered Honeycomb Parts

Dagneux, France

 

Composite Materials

 

Prepregs

Duxford, England

 

Composite Materials

 

Prepregs; Adhesives; Honeycomb and Honeycomb Parts

Illescas, Spain

 

Composite Materials

 

Carbon Fibers

Leicester, England

 

Composite Materials

 

Lightweight Multiaxials Fabrics

Les Avenieres, France

 

Composite Materials

 

Industrial Fabrics; Specialty Reinforcements

Nantes, France

 

Composite Materials

 

Prepregs

Neumarkt, Austria

 

Composite Materials

 

Prepregs

Parla, Spain

 

Composite Materials

 

Prepregs

Roussillon, France

 

Composite Materials

 

PAN Precursor  and Carbon Fibers

Stade, Germany

 

Composite Materials

 

Prepregs

Tianjin, China

 

Composite Materials

 

Prepregs

Welkenraedt, Belgium

 

Engineered Products

 

Engineered Honeycomb Parts

The Casablanca and Roussillon facilities are currently under construction and both facilities should be operational in 2017, with qualifications for the Roussillon facility to be completed in 2018. We lease the land and buildings in Nantes, France and Tianjin, China; and the land on which the Burlington, Washington facility is located. We also lease portions of the facilities located in Casa Grande, Arizona, Pottsville, Pennsylvania, Kent, Washington and Leicester, England. We own all other remaining facilities. For further information, refer to “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” and to Note 6 to the accompanying consolidated financial statements of this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

 

 

ITEM 3. Legal Proceedings

We are involved in litigation, investigations and claims arising out of the normal conduct of our business, including those relating to commercial transactions, environmental, employment and health and safety matters. We estimate and accrue our liabilities resulting from such matters based on a variety of factors, including the stage of the proceeding; potential settlement value; assessments by internal and external counsel; and assessments by environmental engineers and consultants of potential environmental liabilities and remediation costs. Such estimates are not discounted to reflect the time value of money due to the uncertainty in estimating the timing of the expenditures, which may extend over several years.

 

While it is impossible to ascertain the ultimate legal and financial liability with respect to certain contingent liabilities and claims, we believe, based upon our examination of currently available information, our experience to date, and advice from legal counsel, that the individual and aggregate liabilities resulting from the ultimate resolution of these contingent matters, after taking into consideration our existing insurance coverage and amounts already provided for, will not have a material adverse impact on our consolidated results of operations, financial position or cash flows.

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Environmental Matters

We are subject to various U.S. and international federal, state and local environmental, and health and safety laws and regulations. We are also subject to liabilities arising under the Federal Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (“CERCLA” or “Superfund”), the Clean Air Act, the Clean Water Act, the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, and similar state and international laws and regulations that impose responsibility for the control, remediation and abatement of air, water and soil pollutants and the manufacturing, storage, handling and disposal of hazardous substances and waste.

 

We have been named as a potentially responsible party (“PRP”) with respect to several hazardous waste disposal sites that we do not own or control, which are included on, or proposed to be included on, the Superfund National Priority List of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (“EPA”) or on equivalent lists of various state governments. Because CERCLA allows for joint and several liability in certain circumstances, we could be responsible for all remediation costs at such sites, even if we are one of many PRPs. We believe, based on the amount and nature of our waste, and the number of other financially viable PRPs, that our liability in connection with such matters will not be material.

 

Lodi, New Jersey Site

Pursuant to the New Jersey Industrial Site Recovery Act, Hexcel entered into an Administrative Consent Order for the environmental remediation of a manufacturing facility we own and formerly operated in Lodi, New Jersey.  Hexcel has completed all active investigation and remediation activities, including restoration of the river embankment and installation of a barrier to prevent contaminant migration and have received a Response Action Outcome. Hexcel is in the process of monitoring contaminant levels to support a Monitored Natural Attenuation program and therefore we believe the spending on this program is largely complete.

 

Lower Passaic River Study Area

Hexcel and a group of approximately 52 other PRPs comprise the Lower Passaic Cooperating Parties Group (the “CPG”). Hexcel and the CPG are subject to a May 2007 Administrative Order on Consent (“AOC”) to perform a Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (“RI/FS”) of environmental conditions in the Lower Passaic River watershed. We were included in the CPG based on our operations at our former manufacturing site in Lodi, New Jersey.

In March 2016, the EPA issued a Record of Decision (“ROD”) setting forth the EPA’s selected remedy for the lower eight miles of the river. in addition to a “no action” option. The ROD calls for capping and dredging of the lower eight miles of the Passaic River, with the placement of an engineered cap over the entire eight miles, at an expected cost ranging from $0.97 billion to $2.07 billion, according to the EPA. Because the EPA has not yet selected a remedy for the upper nine miles of the Lower Passaic River, this estimate range does not include any costs related to a future remedy for the upper portion of the river. Now that it has issued the final ROD, the EPA will seek to hold some combination of the PRPs liable to perform the work selected through the ROD. At this point, we have not yet determined our allocable share of performing the selected remedy. However, based on a review of the Company’s position, and as no point within the range is a more probable outcome than any other point, the Company has determined that its accrual is sufficient at this time. The total accrued liability related to this matter was $2.1 million at December 31, 2016 and $1.9 million at December 31, 2015. Despite the issuance of the final ROD, there continue to be many uncertainties associated with the selected remedy and the Company’s allocable share of the remediation. Given those uncertainties, the amounts accrued may not be indicative of the amounts for which the Company is ultimately responsible and will be refined as events in the remediation process develop.

 

Kent, Washington Site

We were party to a cost-sharing agreement regarding the operation of certain environmental remediation systems necessary to satisfy a post-closure care permit issued to a previous owner of our Kent, Washington site by the EPA. Under the terms of the cost-sharing agreement, we were obligated to reimburse the previous owner for a portion of the cost of the required remediation activities. The previous owner, who also continues to own an adjacent site, has installed certain remediation and isolation technologies and is operating those in accordance with an order agreed with the State of Washington. This isolation is expected to ultimately prevent further migration of contaminants to our site and enable us to perform a cleanup of our site. We and the Washington Department of Ecology have reached an agreed order to perform certain cleanup activities on our site by certain deadlines, and we are in full compliance with the order as modified. The Department of Ecology has recently approved a reduced number of monitoring wells, to cease operation of the extraction wells and agreed with a plan for more active remediation going forward. The total accrued liability related to this matter was $0.3 million and $0.5 million at December 31, 2016 and December 31, 2015, respectively.

 

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Omega Chemical Corporation Superfund Site, Whittier, California

We are a PRP at a former chemical waste site in Whittier, California. The PRPs at Omega have established a PRP Group, the “Omega PRP Group”, and are currently investigating and remediating soil and groundwater at the site pursuant to a Consent Decree with the EPA. The Omega PRP Group has attributed approximately 1.07% of the waste tonnage sent to the site to Hexcel. In addition to the Omega site specifically, the EPA is investigating the scope of regional groundwater contamination in the vicinity of the Omega site and issued a Record of Decision; the Omega PRP Group members have been noticed by the EPA as PRPs who will be required to be involved in the remediation of the regional groundwater contamination in that vicinity as well. As a member of the Omega PRP Group, Hexcel will incur costs associated with the investigation and remediation of the Omega site and the regional groundwater remedy, although our ultimate liability, if any, in connection with this matter cannot be determined at this time. The total accrued liability relating to potential liability for both the Omega site and regional groundwater remedies was $0.6 million at December 31, 2016 and $0.3 million at December 31, 2015.

Environmental remediation reserve activity for the three years ended December 31, 2016 was as follows:

 

 

 

For the year ended December 31,

 

(In millions)

 

2016

 

 

2015

 

 

2014

 

Beginning remediation accrual balance

 

$

2.9

 

 

$

5.0

 

 

$

3.9

 

Current period expenses

 

 

1.2

 

 

 

0.5

 

 

 

6.0

 

Cash expenditures

 

 

(0.9

)

 

 

(2.6

)

 

 

(4.9

)

Ending remediation accrual balance

 

$

3.2

 

 

$

2.9

 

 

$

5.0

 

Capital expenditures for environmental matters

 

$

13.2

 

 

$

7.1

 

 

$

7.3

 

 

Environmental Summary

Our estimate of liability as a PRP and our remaining costs associated with our responsibility to remediate the Lower Passaic River in New Jersey; Kent, Washington; and other sites are accrued in the consolidated balance sheets. As of December 31, 2016 and 2015, our aggregate environmental related accruals were $3.2 million and $2.9 million, respectively. As of December 31, 2016 and 2015, $1.4 million and $1.1 million, respectively, were included in current other accrued liabilities, with the remainder included in other non-current liabilities. As related to certain environmental matters, the accruals were estimated at the low end of a range of possible outcomes since no amount within the range is a better estimate than any other amount. If we had accrued, for those sites where we are able to estimate our liability, at the high end of the range of possible outcomes, our accrual would have been $16 million higher at December 31, 2016 and 2015.

These accruals can change significantly from period to period due to such factors as additional information on the nature or extent of contamination, the methods of remediation required, changes in the apportionment of costs among responsible parties and other actions by governmental agencies or private parties, or the impact, if any, of being named in a new matter.

Environmental remediation spending charged directly to our reserve balance was $0.9 million and $2.6 million for the years ended December 31, 2016 and 2015, respectively. In addition, our operating costs relating to environmental compliance charged directly to expense were $10.1 million and $10.7 million for the years ended December 31, 2016 and 2015.

 

ITEM 4. Mine Safety Disclosure

Not applicable.

 

 

 

16


 

PART II

 

 

ITEM 5. Market for Registrant’s Common Equity and Related Stockholder Matters

Hexcel common stock is traded on the New York Stock Exchange. The range of high and low sales prices of our common stock on the New York Stock Exchange is contained in Note 20 to the accompanying consolidated financial statements of this Annual Report on Form 10-K and is incorporated herein by reference.

On January 25, 2017, the Board of Directors declared a $0.11 quarterly dividend.  The dividend will be payable to stockholders of record as of February 8, 2017, with a payment date of February 15, 2017.   The Company announced programs to repurchase common stock of $250 million in 2015 and $150 million in each of the years 2014 and 2013. During 2016, 2015 and 2014 the Company repurchased a total of $111 million, $146 million and $160 million of shares, respectively. There was $93 million remaining under the authorized 2015 share repurchase program at December 31, 2016. On February 9, 2017, the Board of Directors authorized an additional $300 million share repurchase program.  

On January 31, 2017, there were 658 holders of record of our common stock.

The following chart provides information regarding repurchases of Hexcel common stock:

 

Period

 

(a)

Total Number

of

Shares (or

Units)

Purchased

 

 

(b)

Average Price

Paid

per Share (or Unit)

 

 

(c)

Total Number of

Shares (or Units)

Purchased as

Part of

Publicly Announced
Plans or Programs

 

 

(d)

Maximum Number (or

Approximate Dollar Value) of

Shares (or Units) that

May Yet

Be Purchased Under the

Plans or

Programs

 

October 1 — October 31, 2016

 

 

607,483

 

 

$

43.16

 

 

 

607,483

 

 

$

92,776,000

 

November 1 — November 30, 2016

 

 

 

 

$

 

 

 

 

 

$

92,776,000

 

December 1 — December 31, 2016

 

 

 

 

$

 

 

 

 

 

$

92,776,000

 

Total

 

 

607,483

(1)

 

$

43.16

 

 

 

607,483

 

 

$

92,776,000

 

 

 

1)

In October 2015, our Board authorized us to repurchase an additional $250 million of our outstanding common stock. The Company repurchased $26.2 million of common stock during the fourth quarter of 2016. There was $92.8 million remaining under the current authorized share repurchase program at December 31, 2016. On February 9, 2017, our Board authorized us to repurchase an additional $300 million of our outstanding common stock.

 

 

 

ITEM 6. Selected Financial Data

The information required by Item 6 is contained on page 25 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K under the caption “Selected Financial Data” and is incorporated herein by reference.

 

 

ITEM 7. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

The information required by Item 7 is contained on pages 26 to 36 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K under “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” and is incorporated herein by reference.

 

ITEM 7A. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures about Market Risk

The information required by Item 7A is contained under the heading “Market Risks” on pages 36 to 38 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K and is incorporated herein by reference.

 

 

ITEM 8. Financial Statements and Supplementary Data

The information required by Item 8 is contained on pages 44 to 78 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K under “Consolidated Financial Statements and Supplementary Data” and is incorporated herein by reference. The Reports of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firms are contained on page 41 to 43 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K under the caption “Reports of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firms” and is incorporated herein by reference.

 

 

17


 

ITEM 9. Changes in and Disagreements with Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure

None.

 

 

ITEM 9A. Controls and Procedures

Our Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer have evaluated our disclosure controls and procedures as of December 31, 2016 and have concluded that these disclosure controls and procedures are effective to ensure that information required to be disclosed by us in the reports that we file or submit under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 is recorded, processed, summarized and reported within the time periods specified in the SEC’s rules and forms. These disclosure controls and procedures include, without limitation, controls and procedures designed to ensure that information required to be disclosed by us in the reports we file or submit is accumulated and communicated to management, including the Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer, as appropriate to allow timely decisions regarding required disclosure.

Our Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer have concluded that there have not been any changes in our internal control over financial reporting during the fourth quarter that have materially affected, or are reasonably likely to materially affect, our internal control over financial reporting.

Management’s report on our internal control over financial reporting is contained on page 42 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K and is incorporated herein by reference.

 

 

 

ITEM 9B. Other Information

None.

 

 

 

18


 

PART III

 

 

ITEM 10. Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance

The information required by Item 10 will be contained in our definitive proxy statement for the 2017 Annual Meeting of Stockholders, which will be filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission within 120 days after the close of the fiscal year ended December 31, 2016. Such information is incorporated herein by reference.

 

 

ITEM 11. Executive Compensation

The information required by Item 11 will be contained in our definitive proxy statement for the 2017 Annual Meeting of Stockholders, which will be filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission within 120 days after the close of the fiscal year ended December 31, 2016. Such information is incorporated herein by reference.

 

 

ITEM 12. Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters

The information required by Item 12 will be contained in our definitive proxy statement for the 2017 Annual Meeting of Stockholders, which will be filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission within 120 days after the close of the fiscal year ended December 31, 2016. Such information is incorporated herein by reference.

 

 

ITEM 13. Certain Relationships and Related Transactions, and Director Independence

The information required by Item 13 will be contained in our definitive proxy statement for the 2017 Annual Meeting of Stockholders, which will be filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission within 120 days after the close of the fiscal year ended December 31, 2016. Such information is incorporated herein by reference.

 

 

ITEM 14. Principal Accountant Fees and Services

The information required by Item 14 will be contained in our definitive proxy statement for the 2017 Annual Meeting of Stockholders, which will be filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission within 120 days after the close of the fiscal year ended December 31, 2016. Such information is incorporated herein by reference.

 

 

 

19


 

PART IV

 

 

ITEM 15. Exhibits and Financial Statement Schedules

(a) Financial Statements, Financial Statement Schedules and Exhibits

 

(1)

 

Financial Statements:

 

 

 

 

Reports of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firms

 

 

 

 

Consolidated Balance Sheets as of December 31, 2016 and 2015

 

 

 

 

Consolidated Statements of Operations for each of the three years ended December 31, 2016, 2015, and 2014

 

 

 

 

Consolidated Statements of Comprehensive Income for each of the three years ended December 31, 2016, 2015 and 2014

 

 

 

 

Consolidated Statements of Stockholders’ Equity for each of the three years ended December 31, 2016, 2015 and 2014

 

 

 

 

Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows for each of the three years ended December 31, 2016, 2015 and 2014

 

 

 

 

Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements

 

 

(2)

 

Financial Statement Schedule for the three years ended December 31, 2016, 2015 and 2014:

 

 

 

 

Schedule II — Valuation and Qualifying Accounts

 

 

 

 

All other schedules are omitted because they are not applicable or the required information is shown in the financial statements or the notes thereto.

(3) Exhibits:

The following list of exhibits includes exhibits submitted with this Form 10-K as filed with the SEC and those incorporated by reference to other filings.

 

Exhibit No.

 

Description

3.1

 

Restated Certificate of Incorporation of Hexcel Corporation (incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 1 to the Company’s Registration Statement on Form 8-A dated July 9, 1996, Registration No. 1-08472).

 

 

 

3.2

 

Certificate of Amendment of the Restated Certificate of Incorporation of Hexcel Corporation (incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 3.2 to the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K/A for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2002, filed on March 31, 2003).

 

 

 

3.3

 

Amended and Restated Bylaws of Hexcel Corporation (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 3 to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K dated September 23, 2014).

 

 

 

4.1

  

Form of Indenture between Hexcel Corporation and U.S. Bank National Association (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 4.1 to the Company’s Registration Statement on Form S-3 dated October 21, 2014, Registration No. 333-199500).

 

 

 

4.2

 

Indenture, dated as of August 3, 2015, between Hexcel Corporation and U.S. Bank National Association, as Trustee (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 4.1 to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K dated August 3, 2015).

 

 

 

4.3

 

First Supplemental Indenture, dated as of August 3, 2015, between Hexcel Corporation and U.S. Bank National Association, as Trustee (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 4.2 to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K dated August 3, 2015).

 

 

 

4.4

 

Form of Note for 4.700% Senior Notes due 2025 (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 4.3 to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K dated August 3, 2015).

 

 

 

10.1

 

Credit Agreement, dated as of September 24, 2014, by and among Hexcel Corporation, Hexcel Holdings Luxembourg S.à.r.l., the financial institutions from time to time party thereto, Citizens Bank, National Association, as administrative agent for the lenders, Citizens Bank, National Association, HSBC Bank USA, National Association, Merrill Lynch, Pierce, Fenner & Smith Incorporated and Wells Fargo Securities, LLC, as joint book managers and joint lead arrangers, Bank of America, N.A., HSBC Bank USA, National Association and Wells Fargo Bank, National Association, as syndication agents, and Fifth Third Bank, SunTrust Bank, TD Bank, N.A. and U.S. Bank National Association, as documentation agents (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 99.1 to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K dated September 29, 2014).

20


 

Exhibit No.

 

Description

 

 

 

10.2

 

Company Guaranty, dated as of September 24, 2014, by Hexcel Corporation in favor of and for the benefit of Citizens Bank, National Association, as administrative agent for each of the Lender Group (as defined in the Credit Agreement) (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 99.2 to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K dated September 29, 2014).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

10.3*

 

Hexcel Corporation 2013 Incentive Stock Plan (incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 4.4 to the Company’s Registration Statement on Form S-8 (Registration No. 333-188292), filed on May 2, 2013).

 

 

 

10.4*

 

Hexcel Corporation 2003 Incentive Stock Plan (incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 10.3 to the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K/A for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2002, filed on March 31, 2003).

 

 

 

10.5(a)*

 

Hexcel Corporation 2003 Incentive Stock Plan as amended and restated December 11, 2003 (incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 10.3(a) to the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2003).

 

 

 

10.5(b)*

 

Hexcel Corporation 2003 Incentive Stock Plan as amended and restated May 19, 2005 (incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 99.2 to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K dated May 24, 2005).

 

 

 

10.5(c)*

 

Hexcel Corporation 2003 Incentive Stock Plan as amended and restated December 31, 2008 (incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 99.12 to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K dated January 7, 2009).

 

 

 

10.5(d)*

 

Hexcel Corporation 2003 Incentive Stock Plan, as amended and restated as of May 7, 2009 (incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 10.4(d) to the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2009).

 

 

 

10.6*

 

Hexcel Corporation Management Incentive Compensation Plan, as Amended and Restated on December 8, 2016.

 

 

 

10.7*

 

Hexcel Corporation Long-Term Incentive Plan (incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 10.7 to the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2001).

 

 

 

10.8*

 

Form of Employee Option Agreement (2014 - 2017).

 

 

 

10.9*

 

Form of Employee Option Agreement (2012 and 2013) (incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 10.11 to the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2011).

 

 

 

10.10*

 

Form of Employee Option Agreement (2010) (incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 10.10 to the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2009).

 

 

 

10.11*

 

Form of Employee Option Agreement (2009) (incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 10.10 to the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2008).

 

 

 

10.12*

 

Modification to Option Agreements (incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 10.11 to the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2008).

 

 

 

10.13*

 

Form of Employee Option Agreement (2008) (incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 10.9 to the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2007).

 

 

 

10.14*

 

Form of Employee Option Agreement (2007) (incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 10.9 to the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2006).

 

 

 

10.15*

 

Form of Restricted Stock Unit Agreement (2014 - 2017) (incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 99.1 to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K dated January 27, 2014).

 

 

 

10.16*

 

Form of Performance Based Award Agreement (2017) (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 99.1 to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K dated January 30, 2017).

 

 

 

10.17*

 

Form of Performance Based Award Agreement (2015 and 2016) (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 99.1 to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K dated January 26, 2015).

 

 

 

10.18*

 

Hexcel Corporation Nonqualified Deferred Compensation Plan, Effective as of January 1, 2005, Amended and Restated as of December 31, 2008 (incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 99.14 to The Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K dated January 7, 2009).

 

 

 

10.19*

 

Offer of Employment between Hexcel Corporation and Nick L. Stanage dated July 22, 2013 (incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 10.2 to the Company’s Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q for the quarter ended September 30, 2013).

21


 

Exhibit No.

 

Description

 

 

 

10.20*

 

Supplemental Executive Retirement Agreement dated October 28, 2009, between Nick L. Stanage and Hexcel Corporation (incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 99.1 to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K dated October 28, 2009).

 

 

 

10.21*

 

Hexcel Corporation Executive Severance Policy (incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 10.3 to the Company’s Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q for the quarter ended September 30, 2013).

 

 

 

10.22*

 

Amended and Restated Executive Severance Agreement between Hexcel Corporation and Wayne C. Pensky, dated December 31, 2008 (incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 99.4 to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K dated January 7, 2009).

 

 

 

10.23*

 

Amended and Restated Executive Deferred Compensation Agreement between Hexcel Corporation and Wayne C. Pensky, dated December 31, 2007 (incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 99.3 to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K dated January 7, 2008).

 

 

 

10.24*

 

Amended and Restated Executive Severance Agreement between Hexcel Corporation and Ira J. Krakower, dated December 31, 2008 (incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 99.5 to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K dated January 7, 2009).

 

 

 

10.25*

 

Amended and Restated Supplemental Executive Retirement Agreement dated December 31, 2008, between Ira J. Krakower and Hexcel Corporation (incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 99.3 to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K dated January 7, 2009).

 

 

 

10.26*

 

Amended and Restated Executive Severance Agreement between Hexcel Corporation and Robert G. Hennemuth, dated December 31, 2008 (incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 99.6 to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K dated January 7, 2009).

 

 

 

10.27*

 

Amended and Restated Executive Deferred Compensation Agreement between Hexcel Corporation and Robert G. Hennemuth, dated December 31, 2007 (incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 99.4 to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K dated January 7, 2008).

 

 

 

10.28*

 

Separation and Consulting Agreement between Hexcel Corporation and Ira J. Krakower, dated September 7, 2016 (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.1 to the Company’s Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q for the quarter ended September 30, 2016).

 

 

 

10.29*

 

Director Compensation Program, as adopted on May 8, 2014 (incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 10.37 to the Company’s Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q for the quarter ended June 30, 2014).

 

 

 

10.30*

 

Form of Restricted Stock Unit Agreement for Non-Employee Directors (incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 99 to the Company’s Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q for the quarter ended June 30, 2013).

 

10.31*

 

Hexcel Corporation 2016 Employee Stock Purchase Plan (incorporated herein by reference to Annex B to the Company’s Proxy Statement dated March 17, 2016).

 

21

 

Subsidiaries of the Company.

 

 

 

23.1

 

Consent of Ernst & Young LLP.

 

 

 

23.2

 

Consent of PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP.

 

 

 

24

 

Power of Attorney (included on signature page).

 

 

 

31.1

 

Certification of Chief Executive Officer, Pursuant to Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.

 

 

 

31.2

 

Certification of Chief Financial Officer, Pursuant to Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.

 

 

 

32

 

Certification of Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer Pursuant to 18 U.S.C. Section 1350, as Adopted Pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.

 

 

 

101

 

The following materials from the Hexcel Corporation Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2016, formatted in Extensible Business Reporting Language (XBRL): (i) the Consolidated Statements of Operations, (ii) Consolidated Statements of Comprehensive Income (iii), Consolidated Balance Sheets, (iv) Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows, and (v) related notes.

 

 

* Indicates management contract or compensatory plan or arrangement.

22


 

 

 

SIGNATURES

Pursuant to the requirements of Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, the Registrant has duly caused this report to be signed on its behalf by the undersigned, thereunto duly authorized.

 

 

 

Hexcel Corporation

 

 

 

February 9, 2017

 

/s/ NICK L. STANAGE 

(Date)

 

Nick L. Stanage

 

 

Chairman of the Board of Directors,

 

 

Chief Executive Officer and President

KNOWN TO ALL PERSONS BY THESE PRESENTS, that each person whose signature appears below constitutes and appoints each of Nick L. Stanage, Wayne C. Pensky and Gail Lehman, individually, his attorney-in-fact, with the power of substitution, for him in any and all capacities, to sign any amendments to this report, and to file the same, with exhibits thereto and other documents in connection therewith, with the Securities and Exchange Commission, hereby ratifying and confirming all that each said attorney-in-fact, or his substitute or substitutes, may do or cause to be done by virtue hereof.

23


 

Pursuant to the requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, this report has been signed below by the following persons on behalf of the Registrant and in the capacities and on the dates indicated.

 

Signature

 

Title

 

Date

 

 

 

 

 

/s/ NICK L. STANAGE

 

Chairman of the Board of Directors,

 

February 9, 2017

(Nick L. Stanage)

 

Chief Executive Officer and President

 

 

 

 

(Principal Executive Officer)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

/s/ WAYNE PENSKY

 

Executive Vice President and

 

February 9, 2017

(Wayne Pensky)

 

Chief Financial Officer

 

 

 

 

(Principal Financial Officer)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

/s/ KIMBERLY HENDRICKS

 

Senior Vice President, Corporate Controller and

 

 

(Kimberly Hendricks)

 

Chief Accounting Officer

 

February 9, 2017

 

 

(Principal Accounting Officer)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

/s/ JOEL S. BECKMAN

 

Director

 

February 9, 2017

(Joel S. Beckman)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

/s/ LYNN BRUBAKER

 

Director

 

February 9, 2017

(Lynn Brubaker)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

/s/ JEFFREY C. CAMPBELL

 

Director

 

February 9, 2017

(Jeffrey C. Campbell)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

/s/ CYNTHIA EGNOTOVICH

 

Director

 

February 9, 2017

(Cynthia Egnotovich)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

/s/ W. KIM FOSTER

 

Director

 

February 9, 2017

(W. Kim Foster)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

/s/ THOMAS A. GENDRON

 

Director

 

February 9, 2017

(Thomas A. Gendron)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

/s/ JEFFREY A. GRAVES

 

Director

 

February 9, 2017

(Jeffrey A. Graves)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

/s/ GUY HACHEY

 

Director

 

February 9, 2017

(Guy Hachey)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

/s/ DAVID C. HILL

 

Director

 

February 9, 2017

(David C. Hill)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

/s/ DAVID L. PUGH

 

Director

 

February 9, 2017

(David L. Pugh)

 

 

 

 

 

24


 

Selected Financial Data

The following table summarizes selected financial data as of and for the five years ended December 31:

 

(In millions, except per share data)

 

2016

 

 

2015

 

 

2014

 

 

2013

 

 

2012

 

Results of Operations:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net sales

 

$

2,004.3

 

 

$

1,861.2

 

 

$

1,855.5

 

 

$

1,678.2

 

 

$

1,578.2

 

Cost of sales

 

 

1,439.7

 

 

 

1,328.4

 

 

 

1,346.7

 

 

 

1,224.2

 

 

 

1,171.5

 

Gross margin

 

 

564.6

 

 

 

532.8

 

 

 

508.8

 

 

 

454.0

 

 

 

406.7

 

Selling, general and administrative expenses

 

 

157.6

 

 

 

156.1

 

 

 

149.1

 

 

 

141.4

 

 

 

130.7

 

Research and technology expenses

 

 

46.9

 

 

 

44.3

 

 

 

47.9

 

 

 

41.7

 

 

 

36.7

 

Other expense (income), net

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

6.0

 

 

 

 

 

 

(9.5

)

Operating income

 

 

360.1

 

 

 

332.4

 

 

 

305.8

 

 

 

270.9

 

 

 

248.8

 

Interest expense, net

 

 

22.1

 

 

 

14.2

 

 

 

8.0

 

 

 

7.3

 

 

 

10.0

 

Non-operating expense, net

 

 

0.4

 

 

 

 

 

 

0.5

 

 

 

1.0

 

 

 

1.1

 

Income before income taxes and equity in earnings

 

 

337.6

 

 

 

318.2

 

 

 

297.3

 

 

 

262.6

 

 

 

237.7

 

Provision for income taxes

 

 

90.3

 

 

 

83.0

 

 

 

89.3

 

 

 

76.0

 

 

 

74.1

 

Income before equity in earnings

 

 

247.3

 

 

 

235.2

 

 

 

208.0

 

 

 

186.6

 

 

 

163.6

 

Equity in earnings from affiliated companies

 

 

2.5

 

 

 

2.0

 

 

 

1.4

 

 

 

1.3

 

 

 

0.7

 

Net income

 

$

249.8

 

 

$

237.2

 

 

$

209.4

 

 

$

187.9

 

 

$

164.3

 

Basic net income per common share

 

$

2.69

 

 

$

2.48

 

 

$

2.16

 

 

$

1.88

 

 

$

1.64

 

Diluted net income per common share

 

$

2.65

 

 

$

2.44

 

 

$

2.12

 

 

$

1.84

 

 

$

1.61

 

Weighted-average shares outstanding:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Basic

 

 

92.8

 

 

 

95.8

 

 

 

96.8

 

 

 

100.0

 

 

 

100.2

 

Diluted

 

 

94.2

 

 

 

97.2

 

 

 

98.7

 

 

 

102.1

 

 

 

102.0

 

Financial Position:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total assets

 

$

2,400.6

 

 

$

2,187.4

 

 

$

2,036.4

 

 

$

1,836.1

 

 

$

1,603.1

 

Working capital

 

$

335.1

 

 

$

341.2

 

 

$

371.1

 

 

$

387.7

 

 

$

340.4

 

Long-term notes payable and capital lease obligations

 

$

684.4

 

 

$

576.5

 

 

$

415.0

 

 

$

292.0

 

 

$

240.0

 

Dividends per share of common stock

 

$

0.44

 

 

$

0.40

 

 

$

 

 

$

 

 

$

 

Stockholders’ equity

 

$

1,244.9

 

 

$

1,179.6

 

 

$

1,149.9

 

 

$

1,160.4

 

 

$

994.1

 

Other Data:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Depreciation

 

$

93.3

 

 

$

76.4

 

 

$

71.2

 

 

$

59.3

 

 

$

57.2

 

Accrual basis capital expenditures

 

$

320.2

 

 

$

289.0

 

 

$

270.2

 

 

$

206.5

 

 

$

241.3

 

Shares outstanding at year-end, less treasury stock

 

 

91.4

 

 

 

93.5

 

 

 

95.5

 

 

 

98.9

 

 

 

99.9

 

 

 

 

 

 

25


 

MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

Business Overview

 

 

 

Year Ended December 31,

 

(In millions, except per share data)

 

2016

 

 

2015

 

 

2014

 

Net sales

 

$

2,004.3

 

 

$

1,861.2

 

 

$

1,855.5

 

Gross margin %

 

 

28.2

%

 

 

28.6

%

 

 

27.4

%

Other expense, net

 

$

 

 

$

 

 

$

6.0

 

Operating income

 

$

360.1

 

 

$

332.4

 

 

$

305.8

 

Operating income %

 

 

18.0

%

 

 

17.9

%

 

 

16.5

%

Interest expense, net

 

$

22.1

 

 

$

14.2

 

 

$

8.0

 

Non-operating expense

 

$

0.4

 

 

$

 

 

$

0.5

 

Provision for income taxes

 

$

90.3

 

 

$

83.0

 

 

$

89.3

 

Equity in earnings from investments in affiliated companies

 

$

2.5

 

 

$

2.0

 

 

$

1.4

 

Net income

 

$

249.8

 

 

$

237.2

 

 

$

209.4

 

Diluted net income per common share

 

$

2.65

 

 

$

2.44

 

 

$

2.12

 

 

 

 

Reconciliations to adjusted operating income, adjusted income, adjusted diluted net income per share and free cash flow are provided below:

 

 

Year Ended December 31,

 

(In millions)

 

2016

 

 

2015

 

 

2014

 

GAAP operating income

 

$

360.1

 

 

$

332.4

 

 

$

305.8

 

Other expense, net (1)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

6.0

 

Adjusted operating income (Non-GAAP)

 

$

360.1

 

 

$

332.4

 

 

$

311.8

 

Adjusted operating income % of sales (Non-GAAP)

 

 

18.0

%

 

 

17.9

%

 

 

16.8

%

 

 

 

Year Ended December 31,

 

(In millions)

 

2016

 

 

2015

 

 

2014

 

GAAP net income

 

$

249.8

 

 

$

237.2

 

 

$

209.4

 

Other expense, net of tax (1)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3.9

 

Non-operating expense, net of tax (2)

 

 

0.3

 

 

 

 

 

 

0.3

 

Discrete tax benefits (3)

 

 

(6.6

)

 

 

(11.6

)

 

 

 

Adjusted net income (Non-GAAP)

 

$

243.5

 

 

$

225.6

 

 

$

213.6

 

Adjusted diluted net income per share (Non-GAAP)

 

$

2.58

 

 

$

2.32

 

 

$

2.16

 

 

 

 

Year Ended December 31,

 

(In millions)

 

2016

 

 

2015

 

 

2014

 

Net cash provided by operating activities

 

$

401.4

 

 

$

301.0

 

 

$

318.0

 

Less: Capital expenditures

 

 

(327.9

)

 

 

(305.3

)

 

 

(260.1

)

Free cash flow (Non-GAAP)

 

$

73.5

 

 

$

(4.3

)

 

$

57.9

 

 

 

 

(1)

Other expense, net for the year ended December 31, 2014 included expense of $6.0 million ($3.9 million after tax) for the increase in environmental reserves primarily for remediation of a former manufacturing facility.

 

(2)

Non-operating expense, net of tax, in 2016 and 2014 was primarily for the accelerated amortization of deferred financing costs related to repaying the term loan and refinancing our revolving credit facility in June 2016 and September 2014.

 

(3)

The year ended December 31, 2016 and 2015 included benefits of $6.6 million and $11.6 million, respectively, primarily related to the release of reserves for uncertain tax positions.

 

 

The Company uses non-GAAP financial measures, including sales and expenses measured in constant dollars (prior year sales and expenses measured at current year exchange rates); operating income adjusted for items included in other expense, net; net income and earnings per share adjusted for items included in non-operating expenses; the effective tax rate adjusted for certain out of period items; and free cash flow. Management believes these non-GAAP measurements are meaningful to investors because they provide a view of Hexcel with respect to ongoing operating results and comparisons to prior periods. These adjustments represent significant charges or credits that are important to an understanding of Hexcel’s overall

26


 

operating results in the periods presented. Such non-GAAP measurements are not determined in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles and should not be viewed as an alternative to GAAP measures of performance.

Business Trends

The Company had another record year, with total sales in 2016 reaching $2.0 billion, a 7.9% increase in constant currency as compared to 2015. In constant currency and by market, our Commercial Aerospace sales increased 11.3%, Space & Defense sales were down 4.6% and our Industrial sales were up 7.4% from 2015. The Commercial Aerospace market represents 71% of our sales, followed by Space & Defense at 16% and Industrial at 13%.

 

In 2016, our Commercial Aerospace sales increased by 11.3% on a constant currency basis. Sales to Airbus and Boeing and their subcontractors, which comprised 89% of our Commercial Aerospace sales, were up more than 11% with new program sales (A350, B787, A320neo and B737 MAX) increasing more than 40% with the A350 and A320neo shipments leading the growth. Sales for the Airbus and Boeing legacy aircraft declined 8% driven by declines in legacy wide-body production. Almost all of our Commercial Aerospace sales are for new aircraft production as we have only nominal aftermarket sales.

 

Airbus and Boeing combined deliveries in 2016 were a record 1,436 aircraft, compared to the previous record of 1,397 aircraft in 2015. The demand for new commercial aircraft is principally driven by two factors. The first is airline passenger traffic (measured by revenue passenger miles) and the second is the replacement rate for existing aircraft. The International Air Transport Association (IATA) estimates 2016 revenue passenger miles were 6.3% higher than 2015. Combined orders for Airbus and Boeing in 2016 were 1,399 planes, compared to 1,804 orders for 2015. Backlog at the end of 2016 increased to a record 12,589 planes, or nearly nine years of backlog at the 2016 delivery pace. Based on Airbus and Boeing announced projections, 2017 deliveries are estimated to be just above 2016.

 

Overall the Commercial Aerospace industry continues to utilize a greater proportion of advanced composite materials with each new generation of aircraft.  These new programs include the A350, B787, A320neo and B737 MAX.  Hexcel has been awarded a contract to supply carbon fiber composite materials for the major primary structures for the A350 and has total content of about $5 million per plane. The A350 has about 53% composite content by weight. As of December 31, 2016, Airbus has 754 orders in backlog for the A350, which had its first customer delivery in December 2014. The B787 has more than 50% composite content by weight, including composite wings and fuselage, compared to the 11% composite content used in the construction of its B777 aircraft and 6% for the B767 the aircraft it is primarily replacing. The B787 entered into service in 2011and Hexcel averages about $1.4 million of content per plane. As of December 31, 2016, Boeing had a backlog of 700 orders for its B787 aircraft and has delivered 500 planes. Both Airbus and Boeing have announced new versions of their narrowbody planes that will have new engines. Airbus’s A320neo had its first customer delivery in January 2016, with 68 planes delivered in 2016 and 4,876 orders in backlog at December 31, 2016. Hexcel’s content on the A320neo is approximately $450,000 per plane or about 50% higher than the prior derivative of the A320. Boeing’s B737 MAX had its first flight on January 29, 2016 and is expected to enter service in 2017. Hexcel’s content on the B737 MAX is approximately $400,000 per aircraft or about 33% higher than the B737.  In 2014, Airbus announced a new version of its A330, the A330neo, which will have new engines, and Boeing announced the B777X, a new version of the B777 with composite wings and new engines.  Our content on the A330neo is estimated at $1.05 million as compared to $900,000 for the A330. Our content on the B777X is expected to be higher than the $1 million per shipset for the B777. Our sales on these new programs represent an increasing percent of our Commercial Aerospace sales.

 

The regional and business aircraft market sales, which account for 11% of Commercial Aerospace sales, were down 3.7% compared to 2015 of which currency made up about 2% of the decline.

 

Our Space & Defense constant currency sales were down about 4.6%, the same in constant currency, from 2015. The decline in 2016 comes from lower rotorcraft sales. Rotorcraft, with about 85% coming from military programs, account for just more than 50% of our Space & Defense sales. New or retrofit rotorcraft programs have an increased reliance on composite materials. In addition, our Engineered Products segment provides specialty value added services such as machining, sub-assembly, and even full blade manufacturing. We are on a wide range of helicopter, military aircraft and space programs, including the V-22 (Osprey) tilt rotor aircraft, A400M military transport, F-35 (joint strike fighter or JSF), and Blackhawk. No one program accounts for more than 12% of our revenues in this market.

 

Our Industrial sales were up 6.4% (7.4% in constant currency). Industrial sales include wind energy, recreation, transportation and general industrial applications, with wind energy accounting for more than half of the total Industrial sales.  About 70% of our Industrial sales are outside of the U.S.  The wind energy submarket sales were in line as compared to 2015. The rest of Industrial sales were up about 20%, in constant currency, as the benefit from the Formax acquisition was partially offset by weakness in recreation and other industrial submarkets.

27


 

Results of Operations

We have two reportable segments: Composite Materials and Engineered Products. Although these segments provide customers with different products and services, they often overlap within three end business markets: Commercial Aerospace, Space & Defense and Industrial. Therefore, we also find it meaningful to evaluate the sales of our segments through the three end business markets. Further discussion and additional financial information about our segments may be found in Note 16 to the accompanying consolidated financial statements of this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

Net Sales: Consolidated net sales of $2,004.3 million for 2016 were $143.1 million, or 7.7%, higher than the $1,861.2 million of net sales for 2015. Consolidated net sales in 2015 increased 0.3% from the $1,855.5 million of sales in 2014. The sales increase in both 2016 and 2015 reflect increased volume in Commercial Aerospace driven by new aircraft programs and increased build rates. The increase in 2016 sales was led by the ramp up of the A350 and the A320neo. Had the same U.S. dollar, British Pound sterling and Euro exchange rates applied in 2015 as in 2016 (“constant currency”), consolidated net sales for 2016 would have been 7.9% higher than 2015. In constant currency, consolidated net sales for 2015 would have been 3.6%, higher than 2014 net sales.

Composite Materials: Net sales of $1,610.0 million for 2016 increased $151.3 million from the $1,458.7 million for 2015 driven by an increase in Commercial Aerospace sales as a result of new programs, primarily the A350 and the A320neo. Space & Defense were 3.1% lower than 2015 and Industrial sales increased 8.0%.  The increase in Industrial sales was driven the Formax acquisition partially offset by weakness in recreation and other industrial submarkets. In 2015, net sales of $1,458.7 million increased $37.8 million from the $1,420.9 million for 2014 driven by an increase in Commercial Aerospace sales.  Space & Defense sales remained at essentially the same level as 2014 and Industrial sales decreased 10.4%.  The decrease in Industrial sales was driven by unfavorable foreign exchange, as on a constant currency basis sales were relatively flat with 2014.

Engineered Products: Net sales of $394.3 million for 2016 decreased $8.2 million from the $402.5 million for 2015 driven by a more than 10% decrease in Space & Defense sales. The decline in Space & Defense sales in 2016 was driven by lower commercial rotorcraft sales. Net sales of $402.5 million for 2015 decreased $32.1 million from the $434.6 million for 2014 driven by a 30% decrease in Space & Defense sales. The decline in Space & Defense sales in 2015 was across all regions and reflects the C-17 program coming to an end combined with a 25% decline in commercial rotorcraft. There are not significant sales to the Industrial market from this segment.

The following table summarizes net sales to third-party customers by segment and end market in 2016, 2015 and 2014:

 

(In millions)

 

 

Commercial
Aerospace

 

 

 

Space &
Defense

 

 

 

Industrial

 

 

 

Total

 

2016 Net Sales

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Composite Materials

 

$

1,100.5

 

 

$

256.4

 

 

$

253.1

 

 

$

1,610.0

 

Engineered Products

 

 

328.8

 

 

 

65.3

 

 

 

0.2

 

 

 

394.3

 

Total

 

$

1,429.3

 

 

$

321.7

 

 

$

253.3

 

 

$

2,004.3

 

 

 

 

71

%

 

 

16

%

 

 

13

%

 

 

100

%

2015 Net Sales

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Composite Materials

 

$

959.7

 

 

$

264.6

 

 

$

234.4

 

 

$

1,458.7

 

Engineered Products

 

 

326.2

 

 

 

72.7

 

 

 

3.6

 

 

 

402.5

 

Total

 

$

1,285.9

 

 

$

337.3

 

 

$

238.0

 

 

$

1,861.2

 

 

 

 

69

%

 

 

18

%

 

 

13

%

 

 

100

%

2014 Net Sales

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Composite Materials

 

$

887.6

 

 

$

271.6

 

 

$

261.7

 

 

$

1,420.9

 

Engineered Products

 

 

327.7

 

 

 

104.2

 

 

 

2.7

 

 

 

434.6

 

Total

 

$

1,215.3

 

 

$

375.8

 

 

$

264.4

 

 

$

1,855.5

 

 

 

 

66

%

 

 

20

%

 

 

14

%

 

 

100

%

Commercial Aerospace: Net sales to the Commercial Aerospace market increased $143.4 million or 11.1% to $1,429.3 million for 2016 as compared to net sales of $1,285.9 million for 2015; 2015 net sales increased by $70.6 million as compared to net sales of $1,215.3 million for 2014. In constant currency, net sales to the Commercial Aerospace market increased $145.3 million or 11.3% in 2016 and increased $90.7 million or 7.6% in 2015 compared to 2014.

Sales for Airbus and Boeing programs, in 2016, were up 11% with new program sales (A350, B787, A320neo and B737 MAX) increasing more than 40% and legacy aircraft related sales decreasing 8%, driven by declines in legacy wide-body production and the transition from legacy narrowbodies to new programs (A320neo and B737MAX). Sales for the regional and business aircraft market were down slightly for the full year as compared to 2015.

28


 

In 2015, sales for Airbus and Boeing programs increased 6% with new program sales (A350, B787, A320neo and B737 MAX) increasing about 40% and legacy aircraft related sales decreasing 5%, driven by declines in legacy wide-body production. Sales for the regional and business aircraft market were down 9.7% as compared to 2014 but were about the same on a constant currency basis.

Space & Defense: Net sales of $321.7 million were $15.6 million lower than 2015; net sales of $337.3 million in 2015 decreased $38.5 million from 2014.  The decline in 2016 sales was driven by lower commercial rotorcraft sales. In 2015, constant currency sales were down about 7% from 2014. The decline in 2015 was across all regions and included the end of the C17 program and a 25% decline in commercial rotorcraft, the planned decline in Eurofighter buildrates, lumpiness from new helicopter programs such as the CH53K, and unanticipated softness in several mature rotorcraft programs. For all of Space & Defense sales, our top 10 programs accounted for about 56% of total Space & Defense sales and in aggregate were slightly higher for the full year of 2015 than for the comparable 2014 period. In 2016, rotorcraft accounted for just above 50% of Space & Defense sales, with about 85% coming from military sales. Hexcel participates in a wide range of programs, in the U.S., Europe and Asia, including rotorcraft, transport, fixed wing and satellite programs.

Industrial: Net sales of $253.3 million for 2016 increased by $15.3 million, or 6%, compared to 2015; net sales of $238.0 in 2015 decreased by $26.4 million or 10% from 2014. Our Industrial constant currency sales were about the same in 2015 as in 2014. Industrial sales include wind energy, recreation, transportation and general industrial applications, with wind energy accounting for more than half of the total Industrial sales.  About 70% of our Industrial sales are outside of the U.S.  The wind energy submarket sales were stable for all three years. In 2016, the rest of Industrial sales were up about 20% in constant currency as the benefit from the Formax acquisition was partially offset by weakness in recreation and other industrial submarkets. The rest of Industrial sales were down about 2% in constant currency in 2015.

Gross Margin: Gross margin for 2016 was $564.6 million or 28.2% of net sales as compared to $532.0 million or 28.6% of net sales in 2015. Exchange rates had a nominal impact on 2016 gross margin percentages and in 2015 exchange rates contributed just under half of the percentage increase. Higher volume and continued improvements in operating performance also contributed to margin growth in 2015. Gross margin for 2014 was $508.8 million, or 27.4% of net sales.

Selling, General and Administrative (“SG&A”) Expenses: SG&A expenses were $157.6 million or 7.9% of net sales for 2016, $156.1 million or 8.4% of net sales for 2015 and $149.1 million or 8.0% of net sales for 2014. The increase in 2015 SG&A from 2014 reflects added infrastructure to support our growth, including almost $10 million more than 2014 on information technology expenses as we completed the implementation of a new ERP system and we continued to invest in other systems. The small decrease in 2016 information technology expenses helped keep the total 2016 spend to just a modest level as compared to 2015.

Research and Technology (“R&T”) Expenses: R&T expenses for 2016 were $46.9 million or 2.3% of net sales; $44.3 million or 2.4% of net sales in 2015 and $47.9 million or 2.6% of net sales in 2014. On a constant currency basis, the expenses in 2016 were more than 10% above 2015 and about the same for 2015 as compared to 2014. We continued to invest in new products and technology to support our growth and productivity initiatives.

Other Income, Net: Other operating income, net for the year ended December 31, 2014, included other expense of $6.0 million for the increase in environmental reserves primarily for remediation related to a former manufacturing facility.

Operating Income: Operating income for 2016 was $360.1 million compared with operating income of $332.4 million for 2015 and $305.8 million for 2014. Operating income as a percent of sales was 18.0%, 17.9% and 16.5% in 2016, 2015, and 2014, respectively. Improved gross margin and the benefits from exchange rates (discussed below) drove the increase in operating margin in 2015.

One of the Company’s performance measures is operating income adjusted for other expense, which is a non-GAAP measure. Adjusted operating income for the year ended December 31, 2014 was $311.8 million or 16.8%. There were no adjustments to the 2016 and 2015 operating income of $360.1 million or 18.0% of net sales and $332.4 million or 17.9% of net sales, respectively. A reconciliation from operating income to adjusted operating income is provided on page 26.

Almost all of the Company’s sales and costs are either in U.S. dollars, Euros or British Pound sterling, with approximately one-quarter of our sales in Euros or British Pound sterling. In addition, much of our European Commercial Aerospace business has sales denominated in dollars and costs denominated in all three currencies. The net impact is that as the dollar strengthens against the Euro and the British Pound sterling, sales will decrease while operating income will increase. We have an active hedging program to minimize the impact on operating income, but our operating income as a percentage of net sales is affected. Foreign exchange had a 40 basis point and 90 basis point favorable impact on 2016 and 2015 operating margin, respectively, and a nominal impact on our operating margin in 2014.  

29


 

Operating income for the Composite Materials segment increased $32.1 million to $368.3 million from $336.2 million in 2015. Operating income for Composite Materials was $308.8 million in 2014. The consistent growth in operating income for the Composite Materials segment was driven primarily by higher commercial aerospace sales volume. Operating income for the year ended December 31, 2016 for the Engineered Products segment decreased $5.8 million to $50.0 million. Operating income for the Engineered Products segment in 2015 decreased by $11.2 million compared with 2014 to $55.8 million. The decline in profitability over the three years was driven by the decline in sales, primarily rotorcraft. Also, there is a learning curve in this segment for new programs as they either start-up or ramp-up, so margins in Engineered Products will be unfavorably impacted as we transition through programs and work our way up the learning curve in making new parts and structures.  Operating income margins for Engineered Products will be less than Composite Materials as it is not nearly as capital intensive. Accordingly, operating income margins in the 12% –14% range for Engineered Products will produce very good returns on invested capital.

We did not allocate corporate net operating expenses of $58.2 million, $59.6 million and $70.0 million to segments in 2016, 2015, and 2014, respectively. Corporate and Other in 2014 included $6.0 million of other expenses, as discussed above.

Interest Expense: Interest expense was $22.1 million for 2016, $14.2 million for 2015 and $8.0 million for 2014. Interest expense increased in both periods due to a higher average interest rate on debt outstanding as a result of the Company issuing, in August 2015, $300 million in aggregate principal amount of 4.7% Senior Unsecured Notes due in 2025.  In addition, debt increased as we completed $111 million of share buybacks and paid a total of $39.8 million of dividends in 2016 and $146 million of share buybacks and paid a total of $38.3 million of dividends in 2015.

Non-operating Expense: As a result of the refinancing of the Senior Credit Facility in 2016 and 2014, we accelerated the unamortized deferred financing costs related to the previous borrowings, incurring a cost of $0.4 million ($0.3 million after tax) and $0.5 million ($0.3 million after tax), respectively.  

Provision for Income Taxes: Our 2016, 2015 and 2014 tax provision was $90.3 million, $83.0 million and $89.3 million for an effective tax rate of 26.8%, 26.1% and 30.0%, respectively. The 2016 and 2015 effective tax rates included a $6.6 million and a $11.6 million benefit primarily related to the release of reserves for uncertain tax positions as well as other benefits recorded during the year, respectively. Excluding the impact of these and other discrete items, the 2016, 2015 and 2014 effective tax rates were 30.0%, 30.9% and 30.6%, respectively. We believe the adjusted effective tax rate, which is a non-GAAP measure, is meaningful since it provides insight to the tax rate of ongoing operations.

Equity in Earnings from Affiliated Companies: Equity in earnings represents our portion of the earnings from our joint venture in Malaysia. Equity in earnings in 2015 also included our portion of the earnings from our former joint venture in the United Kingdom which we acquired in January 2016.

Net Income: Net income was $249.8 million, or $2.65 per diluted share, for the year ended December 31, 2016, compared to $237.2 million, or $2.44 per diluted common share for 2015 and $209.4 million, or $2.12 per diluted common share for 2014. Strong sales volume, particularly in the Commercial Aerospace market, coupled with good cost control led the growth in earnings from 2014 through 2016. Also see the table on page 26 for a reconciliation of GAAP net income from continuing operations to our adjusted “Non-GAAP” measure.

Significant Customers

Approximately 41%, 35% and 31% of our 2016, 2015 and 2014 net sales, respectively, were to Airbus and its subcontractors. Of the 41% of overall sales to Airbus and its subcontractors in 2016, 37% related to Commercial Aerospace market applications and 4% related to Space & Defense market applications. Approximately 28%, 31% and 32% of our 2016, 2015 and 2014 net sales, respectively, were to Boeing and related subcontractors. Of the 28% of overall sales to Boeing and its subcontractors in 2016, 26% related to Commercial Aerospace market applications and 2% related to Space & Defense market applications.

Financial Condition

In 2016, we ended the year with total debt, net of cash, of $653.5 million and generated $73.5 million of free cash flow (cash provided by operating activities less cash paid for capital expenditures). In 2016, the Company bought back $111 million of shares, and as of December 31, 2016, has $93 million remaining under its currently authorized share repurchase program.  We also paid $39.8 million of dividends in 2016. In 2017, we expect our capital spending to be in the range of $270 million to $290 million as we expand capacity in line with our outlook, resulting in expected positive free cash flow of more than $100 million. We expect our typical use of cash in the first half of 2017, which will be funded by our available borrowings under our Facility.

30


 

We have a portfolio of derivatives related to currencies and interest rates. We monitor our counterparties and we only use those rated A- or better.

Liquidity

Our cash on hand at December 31, 2016 was $35.2 million and we had $332.9 million borrowings available under our credit facility. Our total debt as of December 31, 2016 was $688.7 million, an increase of $112.2 million from the December 31, 2015 balance. The increase in debt primarily reflects $111 million of stock repurchases, $40 million of dividend payments and $39 million of investments and the assumption of approximately $8 million of debt from the Formax acquisition, partially offset by $74 million of free cash flow.

 The level of available borrowing capacity fluctuates during the course of the year due to factors including capital expenditures, share repurchases and dividend payments, interest and variable compensation payments, changes to working capital, as well as timing of receipts and disbursements within the normal course of business.

In August 2015, the Company issued $300 million in aggregate principal amount of 4.7% Senior Unsecured Notes due in 2025.  The interest rate on these senior notes may be increased by 0.25% each time a credit rating applicable to the notes is downgraded. The maximum rate is 6.7%. The rate at December 31, 2016 was 4.7%. The net proceeds of approximately $296.4 million were initially used to repay, in part, our Senior Unsecured Revolving Credit Facility (the “Facility”).

Short-term liquidity requirements consist primarily of normal recurring operating expenses and working capital needs, capital expenditures, dividend payments and debt service requirements. We expect to meet our short-term liquidity requirements through net cash from operating activities, cash on hand and, if necessary, our revolving credit facility. As of December 31, 2016, long-term liquidity requirements consist primarily of obligations under our long-term debt obligations. We do not have any significant required debt repayments until June 2021 when the Facility expires.

Credit Facilities: In June 2016, the Company amended and extended its $700 Facility. The maturity of the Facility was extended from September 2019 to June 2021. The amendment also provided for a modest reduction in interest costs, as well as less restrictive covenants. The interest rate for the revolver at year-end was LIBOR + 1.125%. The interest rate ranges from LIBOR + 0.875% to a maximum of LIBOR + 1.875%, depending upon the Company’s leverage ratio. At December 31, 2016, total borrowings under our $700 million Facility were $365 million. The Facility permits us to issue letters of credit up to an aggregate amount of $40 million.  Outstanding letters of credit reduce the amount available for borrowing under our revolving loan.  As of December 31, 2016, we had issued letters of credit under the Facility totaling $2.1 million, resulting in undrawn availability under the Facility as of December 31, 2016 of $332.9 million.

 

The Facility contains financial and other covenants, including, but not limited to, restrictions on the incurrence of debt and the granting of liens, as well as the maintenance of an interest coverage ratio and a leverage ratio. In accordance with the terms of the Facility, we are required to maintain a minimum interest coverage ratio of 3.50 (based on the ratio of EBITDA, as defined in the credit agreement, to interest expense) and may not exceed a maximum leverage ratio of 3.50 (based on the ratio of total debt to EBITDA) throughout the term of the Facility. In addition, the Facility contains other terms and conditions such as customary representations and warranties, additional covenants and customary events of default. The conditions and covenants related to the senior notes are less restrictive than those of our Facility. As of December 31, 2016, we were in compliance with all debt covenants and expect to remain in compliance.

 

In June 2016, we also entered into a 60 million ($67.4 million) term loan (“Euro loan”).  The loan has two tranches of which the first tranche for 25 million has a six-month availability period at a rate of Euribor +1.2% and a final maturity date of June 30, 2023. The second tranche for 35 million has a one-year availability period at a rate of Euribor +1.25% and a final maturity date of June 30, 2024. There is a zero percent floor on the Euribor. The loans are payable in annual installments, beginning on June 30, 2017 and June 30, 2019, respectively. We had $26.4 million (25 million) outstanding under this loan at December 31, 2016.

We have a $10.0 million borrowing facility for working capital needs of our Chinese entity with no outstanding balance at December 31, 2016. These funds can only be used locally and, accordingly, we do not include this facility in our borrowing capacity disclosures. The facility is guaranteed by Hexcel Corporation but is uncommitted and can be cancelled at any time.

Operating Activities: We generated $401.4 million in cash from operating activities during 2016, an increase of $100.4 million from 2015 reflecting higher earnings and lower working capital usage. Cash generated from operating activities during 2015 was $301.0 million, a decrease of $17.0 million from 2014 as higher earnings were offset by higher working capital usage.

31


 

Investing Activities: Cash used for investing activities, primarily for capital expenditures, was $366.5 million in 2016 compared to $305.3 million in 2015 and $270.4 million in 2014. 2016 also includes $30 million of investments in affiliates and $8.6 million for the Formax acquisition as discussed below.

In 2016, we acquired an interest in Oxford Performance Materials (“OPM”) for $15.0 million. OPM produces thermoplastic, carbon fiber reinforced 3D printed parts for Commercial Aerospace and Space and Defense applications. In addition, if OPM achieves certain milestones within an 18-month period or at Hexcel’s discretion, the Company will invest an additional $10 million. The additional $10 million investment was made on January 31, 2017. We issued an 8% convertible secured promissory note to Luminati Aerospace LLC (“Luminati”), in the amount of $10 million. Luminati is an aerospace technology company focusing on research, development, testing, and manufacturing of next generation solar-electric unmanned aerial vehicles, or UAVs. The note matures in 2023 and the principal and interest are convertible into Luminati stock. The note will convert upon Luminati achieving certain milestones or at Hexcel’s discretion. We also invested $5 million in Carbon Conversions Incorporated (“CCI”). CCI is a leader in carbon fiber recycling and repurposing.  We account for these three investments using the cost method.

 

In January 2016 the Company acquired the remaining 50% ownership of Formax (UK) Limited (“Formax”). The Company previously acquired a 50% interest in the privately-owned company in December 2014. Located in Leicester, U.K., Formax is a leading manufacturer of composite reinforcements, specializing in the production of lightweight carbon multi-axials and highly engineered glass fiber and aramid fiber fabrics.

 

The Company is in the process of expanding capacity over a multi-year period, primarily for the manufacture of carbon fiber and prepregs to support aerospace growth. These capital projects require large expenditures and long lead times, some taking more than two years to complete. We are also constructing a $250 million facility in Roussillon, France that is expected to be completed in 2017 and qualified in 2018. More than 85% of the $454 million in construction in progress as of December 31, 2016 represents spending on expansion projects primarily at our Roussillon, France; Decatur, Alabama; Salt Lake City, Utah; and Duxford England facilities. We expect a majority of these projects to be placed in service during 2017.

Financing Activities: Financing activities were a use of cash of $46.8 million in 2016 as compared to $10.9 million in 2015 and $36.9 million in 2014. In 2016 and 2014 we had borrowings, net of repayments, from our Facility of $85 million and $123 million, respectively.  In 2015 we had Facility repayments, net of borrowings, of $135.0.  We also had $26 million of borrowings from our Euro loan in 2016. We paid $39 million in dividends in 2016 and $38 million in 2015.

  In August 2015, the Company issued $300 million aggregate principle amount of 4.7% Senior Unsecured Notes due in 2025. The interest rate on these senior notes may be increased by 0.25% each time a credit rating applicable to the notes is downgraded. The maximum rate is 6.7% and the rate at December 31, 2016 remains at 4.7%. The net proceeds of approximately $296.4 million were initially used to repay, in part, our Facility. The Company also repurchased stock as described below.

In October 2015, our Board authorized the repurchase of an additional $250 million of the Company’s stock (“2015 Repurchase Plan”). During 2016 and 2015, the Company spent $111.1 million and $146.1 million to repurchase common stock. This included $100 million to complete the 2014 Repurchase Plan and $157.2 million under the 2015 Repurchase Plan to repurchase common stock.  

In June 2014, our Board authorized a plan to repurchase $150 million of our outstanding common stock (“2014 Repurchase Plan”). In July 2013, our Board authorized us to repurchase $150 million of our outstanding common stock (“2013 Repurchase Plan”), which was completed during the second quarter of 2014. During 2014, the Company spent $160.0 million to repurchase shares of common stock under the approved plans.

Financial Obligations and Commitments:  We have $4.3 million of current debt maturities as of December 31, 2016. The next significant scheduled debt maturity will not occur until 2021, the year the Facility matures. In addition, certain sales and administrative offices, data processing equipment and manufacturing equipment and facilities are leased under operating leases.

Total letters of credit issued and outstanding under the Facility were $2.1 million as of December 31, 2016.

32


 

The following table summarizes the scheduled maturities as of December 31, 2016 of financial obligations and expiration dates of commitments for the years ended 2017 through 2021 and thereafter.

 

(In millions)

 

2017

 

 

2018

 

 

2019

 

 

2020

 

 

2021

 

 

Thereafter

 

 

Total

 

Capital lease

 

$

0.5

 

 

$

 

 

$

 

 

$

 

 

$

 

 

$

 

 

$

0.5

 

Senior unsecured credit facility due 2021

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

365.0

 

 

 

 

 

 

365.0

 

4.7% senior notes due 2025

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

300.0

 

 

 

300.0

 

Euro term loan

 

 

3.8

 

 

 

3.7

 

 

 

3.8

 

 

 

3.7

 

 

 

3.8

 

 

 

7.6

 

 

 

26.4

 

Subtotal

 

 

4.3

 

 

 

3.7

 

 

 

3.8

 

 

 

3.7

 

 

 

368.8

 

 

 

307.6

 

 

 

691.9

 

Operating leases

 

 

8.6

 

 

 

6.2

 

 

 

3.8

 

 

 

2.1

 

 

 

1.5

 

 

 

2.8

 

 

 

25.0

 

Total financial obligations

 

$

12.9

 

 

$

9.9

 

 

$

7.6

 

 

$

5.8

 

 

$

370.3

 

 

$

310.4

 

 

$

716.9

 

Letters of credit

 

$

2.1

 

 

$

 

 

$

 

 

$

 

 

$

 

 

$

 

 

$

2.1

 

Interest payments

 

 

24.9

 

 

 

24.9

 

 

 

24.8

 

 

 

24.2

 

 

 

19.3

 

 

 

62.6

 

 

 

180.7

 

Estimated benefit plan contributions

 

 

5.9

 

 

 

6.6

 

 

 

6.4

 

 

 

9.7

 

 

 

12.8

 

 

 

25.1

 

 

 

66.5

 

Other (a)

 

 

1.4

 

 

 

0.4

 

 

 

0.4

 

 

 

0.4

 

 

 

0.4

 

 

 

0.2

 

 

 

3.2

 

Total commitments

 

$

47.2

 

 

$

41.8

 

 

$

39.2

 

 

$

40.1

 

 

$

402.8

 

 

$

398.3

 

 

$

969.4

 

 

 

(a)

Other represents estimated spending for environmental matters at known sites.

As of December 31, 2016, we had $16.7 million of unrecognized tax benefits. This represents tax benefits associated with various tax positions taken, or expected to be taken, on domestic and international tax returns that have not been recognized in our financial statements due to uncertainty regarding their resolution. The resolution or settlement of these tax positions with the taxing authorities is at various stages. We are unable to make a reliable estimate of the eventual cash flows of the $16.7 million of unrecognized tax benefits.  

For further information regarding our financial obligations and commitments, see Notes 5, 6, 7, 12 and 13 to the accompanying consolidated financial statements of this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

Critical Accounting Policies and Estimates

Our consolidated financial statements are prepared based upon the selection and application of accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America, which require us to make estimates and assumptions about future events that affect amounts reported in our financial statements and accompanying notes. Future events and their effects cannot be determined with absolute certainty. Therefore, the determination of estimates requires the exercise of judgment. Actual results could differ from those estimates, and any such differences may be significant to the financial statements. The accounting policies below are those we believe are the most critical to the preparation of our financial statements and require the most difficult, subjective and complex judgments. Our other accounting policies are described in the accompanying notes to the consolidated financial statements of this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

Deferred Tax Assets and Liabilities

As of December 31, 2016, we had $113.7 million in net deferred tax liabilities consisting of deferred tax assets of $119.1 million offset by deferred tax liabilities of $173.9 million and a valuation allowance of $58.9 million.  As of December 31, 2015, we had $1.6 million in net deferred tax assets consisting of deferred tax assets of $181.9 million offset by deferred tax liabilities of $119.8 million and a valuation allowance of $60.5 million.

 

The valuation allowance as of December 31, 2016 relates primarily to certain net operating loss carryforwards of our foreign subsidiaries for which we have determined, based upon historical results and projected future book and taxable income levels, that a valuation allowance should continue to be maintained.

 

The determination of the required valuation allowance and the amount, if any, of deferred tax assets to be recognized involves significant estimates regarding the timing and amount of reversal of taxable temporary differences, future taxable income and the implementation of tax planning strategies.  In particular, we are required to weigh both positive and negative evidence in determining whether a valuation allowance is required.  Positive evidence would include, for example, a strong earnings history, an event that will increase our taxable income through a continuing reduction in expenses, and tax planning strategies indicating an ability to realize deferred tax assets.  Negative evidence would include, for example, a history of operating losses and losses expected in future years.

33


 

Uncertain Tax Positions

We had unrecognized tax benefits of $16.7 million at December 31, 2016 that, if recognized, would impact our annual effective tax rate. In addition, we recognize interest accrued related to unrecognized tax benefits as a component of interest expense and penalties as a component of income tax expense in the consolidated statements of operations. The Company recognized $1.1 million, $0.6 million, $1.5 million of interest expense and penalties related to the above unrecognized tax benefits in 2016, 2015 and 2014, respectively. The Company had accrued interest of approximately $2.1 million and $2.2 million as of December 31, 2016 and 2015, respectively. During 2016 we reversed $1.1 million of interest related to unrecognized tax benefits.

 

We are subject to taxation in the U.S. and various states and foreign jurisdictions.  Foreign and U.S. state jurisdictions have statutes of limitations generally ranging from 3 to 5 years. Years still open to examination by U.S. (2013 onward) and foreign tax authorities in major jurisdictions include Austria (2012 onward), Belgium (2014 onward), France (2014 onward), Spain (2004 onward) and the U.K. (2014 onward).  We are currently under examination in the U.S. and certain foreign tax jurisdictions.

As of December 31, 2016, we had uncertain tax positions for which it is reasonably possible that amounts of unrecognized tax benefits could significantly change over the next year. These uncertain tax positions relate to our tax returns from 2004 onward, some of which are currently under examination by certain U.S. and European tax authorities. The Company believes it is reasonably possible that the total amount of unrecognized tax benefits as of December 31, 2016 may decrease approximately $2 to $3 million in the fiscal year ending December 31, 2017. Such possible decrease relates primarily to audit settlements and the expiration of statutes of limitation.

Retirement and Other Postretirement Benefit Plans

We maintain qualified defined benefit retirement plans covering certain current and former European employees, as well as nonqualified defined benefit retirement plans and retirement savings plans covering certain eligible U.S. and European employees, and participate in a union sponsored multi-employer pension plan covering certain U.S. employees with union affiliations. In addition, we provide certain postretirement health care and life insurance benefits to eligible U.S. retirees.

Under the retirement savings plans, eligible U.S. employees can contribute up to 75% of their compensation to an individual 401(k) retirement savings account. We make matching contributions equal to 50% of employee contributions, not to exceed 3% of employee compensation.

We have defined benefit retirement plans in the United Kingdom, Belgium, France and Austria covering certain employees of our subsidiaries in those countries. The defined benefit plan in the United Kingdom (the “U.K. Plan”), the largest of the European plans, was terminated in 2011 and replaced with a defined contribution plan. As of December 31, 2016, 32% of the total assets in the U.K. Plan were invested in equities and 24% of the total assets were invested in diversified growth funds. Equity investments are made with the objective of achieving a return on plan assets consistent with the funding requirements of the plan, maximizing portfolio return and minimizing the impact of market fluctuations on the fair value of the plan assets. As a result of an annual review of historical returns and market trends, the expected long-term weighted average rate of return for the U.K. Plan for the 2017 plan year will be 4.75% and for the other European plans as a group will be 3.0%.

We use actuarial models to account for our pension and postretirement plans, which require the use of certain assumptions, such as the expected long-term rate of return, discount rate, rate of compensation increase, healthcare cost trend rates, and retirement and mortality rates, to determine the net periodic costs of such plans. These assumptions are reviewed and set annually at the beginning of each year. In addition, these models use an “attribution approach” that generally spreads individual events, such as plan amendments and changes in actuarial assumptions, over the service lives of the employees in the plan. That is, employees render service over their service lives on a relatively smooth basis and therefore, the income statement effects of retirement and postretirement benefit plans are earned in, and should follow, the same pattern.

We use our actual return experience, future expectations of long-term investment returns, and our actual and targeted asset allocations to develop our expected rate of return assumptions used in the net periodic cost calculations of our funded European defined benefit retirement plans. Due to the difficulty involved in predicting the market performance of certain assets, there will almost always be a difference in any given year between our expected return on plan assets and the actual return. Following the attribution approach, each year’s difference is amortized over a number of future years. Over time, the expected long-term returns are designed to approximate the actual long-term returns and therefore result in a pattern of income and expense recognition that more closely matches the pattern of the services provided by the employees.

We annually set our discount rate assumption for retirement-related benefits accounting to reflect the rates available on high-quality, fixed-income debt instruments. The discount rate assumption used to calculate net periodic retirement related costs for the

34


 

European funded plans was 3.63% for 2016, 3.45% for 2015 and 4.40% in 2014. The rate of compensation increase, which is another significant assumption used in the actuarial model for pension accounting, is determined by us based upon our long-term plans for such increases and assumed inflation. For the postretirement health care and life insurance benefits plan, we review external data and its historical trends for health care costs to determine the health care cost trend rates. Retirement and mortality rates are based primarily on actual plan experience.

Actual results that differ from our assumptions are accumulated and amortized over future periods and, therefore, generally affect the net periodic costs and recorded obligations in such future periods. While we believe that the assumptions used are appropriate, significant changes in economic or other conditions, employee demographics, retirement and mortality rates, and investment performance may materially impact such costs and obligations.

For more information regarding our pension and other postretirement benefit plans, see Note 7 to the accompanying consolidated financial statements of this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

Long-Lived Assets and Goodwill

We have significant long-lived assets. We review these assets for impairment whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying amount of an asset may not be recoverable. The assessment of possible impairment is based upon our ability to recover the carrying value of the assets from the estimated undiscounted future net cash flows, before interest and taxes, of the related operations. If these cash flows are less than the carrying value of such assets, an impairment loss is recognized for the difference between estimated fair value and carrying value. The measurement of impairment requires estimates of these cash flows and fair value. The calculation of fair value is determined based on discounted cash flows. In determining fair value, a considerable amount of judgment is required to determine discount rates, market premiums, financial forecasts, and asset lives.

In addition, we review goodwill for impairment at the reporting unit level at least annually, and whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that goodwill might be impaired. We have four reporting units within the Composite Materials segment, each of which are components that constitute a business for which discrete financial information is available and for which appropriate management regularly reviews the operating results. Within the Engineered Products segment, the reporting unit is the segment as it comprises only a single component. In 2016, the Company performed a qualitative assessment and determined that it was more likely than not that the fair values of our reporting units were not less than their carrying values and it was not necessary to perform the currently prescribed two-step goodwill impairment test.

Commitments and Contingencies

We are involved in litigation, investigations and claims arising out of the normal conduct of our business, including those relating to commercial transactions, environmental, employment and health and safety matters. We estimate and accrue our liabilities resulting from such matters based upon a variety of factors, including the stage of the proceeding; potential settlement value; assessments by internal and external counsel; and assessments by environmental engineers and consultants of potential environmental liabilities and remediation costs. We believe we have adequately accrued for these potential liabilities; however, facts and circumstances may change, such as new developments, or a change in approach, including a change in settlement strategy or in an environmental remediation plan, that could cause the actual liability to exceed the estimates, or may require adjustments to the recorded liability balances in the future.

Our estimate of liability as a potentially responsible party (“PRP”) and our remaining costs associated with our responsibility to remediate the Lower Passaic River in New Jersey; Kent, Washington; and other sites are accrued in the consolidated balance sheets. As of December 31, 2016 and 2015, our aggregate environmental related accruals were $3.2 million and $2.9 million, respectively. As of December 31, 2016 and 2015, $1.4 million and $1.1 million, respectively, were included in current other accrued liabilities, with the remainder included in other non-current liabilities. As related to certain environmental matters, the accruals were estimated at the low end of a range of possible outcomes since no amount within the range is a better estimate than any other amount. If we had accrued, for those sites where we are able to estimate our liability, at the high end of the range of possible outcomes, our accrual would have been $16 million higher at December 31, 2016 and 2015.

These accruals can change significantly from period to period due to such factors as additional information on the nature or extent of contamination, the methods of remediation required, changes in the apportionment of costs among responsible parties and other actions by governmental agencies or private parties, or the impact, if any, of being named in a new matter.

35


 

Environmental remediation reserve activity for the three years ended December 31, 2016 was as follows:

 

 

 

For the year ended

 

(In millions)

 

December 31,
2016

 

 

December 31,
2015

 

 

December 31,
2014

 

Beginning remediation accrual balance

 

$

2.9

 

 

$

5.0

 

 

$

3.9

 

Current period expenses

 

 

1.2

 

 

 

0.5

 

 

 

6.0

 

Cash expenditures

 

 

(0.9

)

 

 

(2.6

)

 

 

(4.9

)

Ending remediation accrual balance

 

$

3.2

 

 

$

2.9

 

 

$

5.0

 

Capital expenditures for environmental matters

 

$

13.2

 

 

$

7.1

 

 

$

7.3

 

 

 

Market Risks

As a result of our global operating and financing activities, we are exposed to various market risks that may affect our consolidated results of operations and financial position. These market risks include, but are not limited to, fluctuations in currency exchange rates, which impact the U.S. dollar value of transactions, assets and liabilities denominated in foreign currencies and fluctuations in interest rates, which impact the amount of interest we must pay on certain debt instruments. Our primary currency exposures are in Europe, where we have significant business activities. To a lesser extent, we are also exposed to fluctuations in the prices of certain commodities, such as electricity, natural gas, aluminum, acrylonitrile and certain chemicals. In addition, we have several contracts with both suppliers and customers that contain pricing adjustments based on the price of oil outside of a specified band.

We attempt to net individual exposures, when feasible, taking advantage of natural offsets. In addition, we employ or may employ interest rate swap agreements, cross-currency swap agreements and foreign currency forward exchange contracts for the purpose of hedging certain specifically identified interest rates and net currency exposures. The use of these financial instruments is intended to mitigate some of the risks associated with fluctuations in interest rates and currency exchange rates, but does not eliminate such risks. We do not use financial instruments for trading or speculative purposes.

Interest Rate Risks

A portion of our long-term debt bears interest at variable rates. From time to time we have entered into interest rate swap agreements to change the underlying mix of variable and fixed interest rate debt. These interest rate swap agreements have modified the percentage of total debt that is exposed to changes in market interest rates. Assuming a 10% favorable and a 10% unfavorable change in the underlying weighted average interest rates of our variable rate debt and swap agreements, interest expense for 2016 of $22.1 million would have decreased to $21.5 million and increased to $22.7 million, respectively.

Interest Rate Swaps

At December 31, 2016, we have approximately $100 million of interest rate swaps that swap the LIBOR on our bank loan for a fixed rate at a weighted average rate of 0.982%. In December 2016, we entered into a new transaction for 25.0 million to swap EURIBOR on our French Term Loan for a fixed rate of 0.365%.  These interest rate swaps are designated as cash flow hedges to floating rate bank loans.  The U.S. dollar swaps will expire between March 2017 and September 2019, and the Euro swap will have a final maturity of June 2023. The fair value of interest rate swap agreements is recorded in other assets or other non-current liabilities with a corresponding amount to Other Comprehensive Income.

The Company has a $150 million interest rate treasury lock agreement to protect against unfavorable movements in the benchmark treasury rate related to a 2017 forecasted debt issuance, in order to increase available debt capacity. We account for this interest rate treasury lock as a cash flow hedge so any change in fair value is recorded into other comprehensive income and then amortized into interest expense over the life of the debt upon issuance.

Foreign Currency Exchange Risks

We operate ten manufacturing facilities in Europe, which generated approximately 51% of our 2016 consolidated net sales. Our European business activities primarily involve three major currencies — the U.S. dollar, the British pound sterling, and the Euro. We also conduct business and sell products to customers throughout the world. Most of the sales in these countries are denominated in U.S. dollars and they have local currency expenses. We also have a small manufacturing facility in China. Currency risk for these locations is not considered material.

36


 

In 2016, our European subsidiaries had third-party sales of $1,041 million of which approximately 69% were denominated in U.S. dollars, 27% were denominated in Euros and 4% were denominated in British pounds sterling. While we seek to reduce the exposure of our European subsidiaries to their sales in non-functional currencies through the purchase of raw materials in the same currency as that of the product sale, the net contribution of these sales to cover the costs of the subsidiary in its functional currency will vary with changes in foreign exchange rates, and as a result, so will vary the European subsidiaries’ percentage margins and profitability. For revenues denominated in the functional currency of the subsidiary, changes in foreign currency exchange rates increase or decrease the value of these revenues in U.S. dollars but do not affect the profitability of the subsidiary in its functional currency. The value of our investments in these countries could be impacted by changes in currency exchange rates over time, and could impact our ability to profitably compete in international markets.

We attempt to net individual functional currency positions of our various European subsidiaries, to take advantage of natural offsets and reduce the need to employ foreign currency forward exchange contracts. We attempt to hedge some, but not necessarily all, of the net exposures of our European subsidiaries resulting from sales they make in non-functional currencies. The benefit of such hedges varies with time and the foreign exchange rates at which the hedges are set. For example, when the Euro strengthened against the U.S. dollar, the benefit of new hedges placed was much less than the value of hedges they replaced that were entered into when the U.S. dollar was stronger. We seek to place additional foreign currency hedges when the dollar strengthens against the Euro or British pound. We do not seek to hedge the value of our European subsidiaries’ functional currency sales and profitability in U.S. dollars. We also enter into short-term foreign currency forward exchange contracts, usually with a term of ninety days or less, to hedge net currency exposures resulting from specifically identified transactions. Consistent with the nature of the economic hedge provided by such contracts, any unrealized gain or loss would be offset by corresponding decreases or increases, respectively, of the underlying transaction being hedged.

We have performed a sensitivity analysis as of December 31, 2016 using a modeling technique that measures the changes in the fair values arising from a hypothetical 10% adverse movement in the levels of foreign currency exchange rates relative to the U.S. dollar with all other variables held constant. The analysis covers all of our foreign currency hedge contracts. The sensitivity analysis indicated that a hypothetical 10% adverse movement in foreign currency exchange rates would have about a $2.6 million impact on our 2016 operating income. However, it should be noted that over time as the adverse movement (in our case a weaker dollar as compared to the Euro or the British pound sterling) continues and new hedges are layered in at the adverse rate, the impact would be more significant. For example, had we not had any hedges in place for 2016, a 10% adverse movement would have reduced our operating income by about $23.0 million.

Foreign Currency Forward Exchange Contracts

A number of our European subsidiaries are exposed to the impact of exchange rate volatility between the U.S. dollar and the subsidiaries’ functional currencies, being either the Euro or the British pound sterling. We entered into contracts to exchange U.S. dollars for Euros and British pound sterling through June 2019. The aggregate notional amount of these contracts was $423.8 million and $417.5 million at December 31, 2016 and 2015, respectively. The purpose of these contracts is to hedge a portion of the forecasted transactions of European subsidiaries under long-term sales contracts with certain customers. These contracts are expected to provide us with a more balanced matching of future cash receipts and expenditures by currency, thereby reducing our exposure to fluctuations in currency exchange rates. For the three years ended December 31, 2016, hedge ineffectiveness was immaterial. Cash flows associated with these contracts are classified within net cash provided by operating activities of continuing operations.

The activity, net of tax, in “accumulated other comprehensive loss” related to foreign currency forward exchange contracts for the years ended December 31, 2016, 2015 and 2014 was as follows:

 

(In millions)

 

2016

 

 

2015

 

 

2014

 

Unrealized (losses) gains at beginning of period

 

$

(15.0

)

 

$

(9.2

)

 

$

7.2

 

Losses (gains) reclassified to net sales

 

 

14.4

 

 

 

11.8

 

 

 

(3.2

)

Decrease in fair value

 

 

(25.3

)

 

 

(17.6

)

 

 

(13.2

)

Unrealized losses at end of period

 

$

(25.9

)

 

$

(15.0

)

 

$

(9.2

)

Unrealized losses of $18.7 million recorded in “accumulated other comprehensive income,” net of tax of $3.3 million, as of December 31, 2016 are expected to be reclassified into earnings over the next twelve months as the hedged sales are recorded. The impact of credit risk adjustments was immaterial for the three years.

In addition, non-designated foreign exchange forward contracts are used to hedge balance sheet exposures. The notional amounts outstanding at December 31, 2016 were U.S. $157.0 million against Euro and at December 31, 2015 were U.S. $125.7 million against Euro and British pound sterling 4.5 million against Euro. Changes in fair value of these forward contracts are recorded in the

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consolidated statements of operations and were losses of $0.9 million, $14.9 million and $16.3 million in 2016, 2015, and 2014 respectively.

Utility Price Risks

We have exposure to utility price risks as a result of volatility in the cost and supply of energy and in natural gas. To minimize the risk, from time to time we enter into fixed price contracts at certain of our manufacturing locations for a portion of our energy usage. Although these contracts would reduce the risk to us during the contract period, future volatility in the supply and pricing of energy and natural gas could have an impact on our future consolidated results of operations.

Recently Issued Accounting Standards

New Accounting Pronouncements

In February 2016, the Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) issued Accounting Standards Update No. 2016-02 (ASU 2016-02), Le