pxs-10q_20151231.htm

 

UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C.  20549

 

FORM 20-F

 

(Mark One)

o

REGISTRATION STATEMENT PURSUANT TO SECTION 12(b) or (g) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

OR

x

ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the fiscal year ended December 31, 2015

OR

o

TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

OR

o

SHELL COMPANY REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

Commission file number 001-37611

 

PYXIS TANKERS INC.

(Exact name of Registrant as specified in its charter and translation of Registrant’s name into English)

 

Marshall Islands

(Jurisdiction of incorporation or organization)

59 K. Karamanli Street

Maroussi 15125 Greece

+30 210 638 0200

(Address of principal executive office)

Mr. Antonios C. Backos

Senior Vice President Corporate Development & General Counsel

59 K. Karamanli Street

Maroussi 15125 Greece

Tel: +30 210 638 0200

Fax: +30 210 653 7715    

(Name, Telephone, E-mail and/or Facsimile number and Address of Company Contact Person)

Securities registered or to be registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act.

 

Title of each class

 

Name of each exchange on which registered

Common Stock, par value U.S. $0.001 per share

 

Nasdaq Capital Market

 

Securities registered or to be registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act.

None

 

Securities for which there is a reporting obligation pursuant to Section 15(d) of the Act.

None

 

Indicate the number of outstanding shares of each of the issuer’s classes of capital or common stock as of the close of the period covered by the Annual Report.

Common Stock, par value U.S. $0.001 per share: 18,244,671 as of December 31, 2015

 

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act.    Yes  o    No  x

If this report is an annual or transition report, indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934.    Yes  o    No   x

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.    Yes  x    No  o

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files).    Yes x     No o 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, or a non-accelerated filer. See definition of “accelerated filer and large accelerated filer” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.

 

 

Large accelerated filer

o

 

Accelerated filer

o

 

Non-accelerated filer

x

Indicate by check mark which basis of accounting the registrant has used to prepare the financial statements included in this filing:

 

 

U.S. GAAP

x

International Financial Reporting Standards as issued
by the International Accounting Standards Board o

 

Other

o

If “Other” has been checked in response to the previous question, indicate by check mark which financial statement item the registrant has elected to follow: Item 17  o    Item 18  o

If this is an annual report, indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act).    Yes  o    No  x

(APPLICABLE ONLY TO ISSUERS INVOLVED IN BANKRUPTCY PROCEEDINGS DURING THE PAST FIVE YEARS)

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has filed all documents and reports required to be filed by Sections 12, 13 or

15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 subsequent to the distribution of securities under a plan confirmed by a court. Yes  o    No  o 

 

 

 


TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

 

 

 

 

PAGE

INTRODUCTION

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SPECIAL NOTE REGARDING FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

PART I

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Item 1.

 

Identity of Directors, Senior Management and Advisers

 

1

 

 

 

 

 

Item 2.

 

Offer Statistics and Expected Timetable

 

1

 

 

 

 

 

Item 3.

 

Key Information

 

1

 

 

 

 

 

Item 4.

 

Information on the Company

 

25

 

 

 

 

 

Item 4A.

 

Unresolved Staff Comments

 

66

 

 

 

 

 

Item 5.

 

Operating and Financial Review and Prospects

 

67

 

 

 

 

 

Item 6.

 

Directors, Senior Management and Employees

 

79

 

 

 

 

 

Item 7.

 

Major Shareholders and Related Party Transactions

 

82

 

 

 

 

 

Item 8.

 

Financial Information

 

84

 

 

 

 

 

Item 9.

 

The Offer and Listing

 

84

 

 

 

 

 

Item 10.

 

Additional Information

 

85

 

 

 

 

 

Item 11.

 

Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk

 

93

 

 

 

 

 

Item 12.

 

Description of Securities Other than Equity Securities

 

94

 

 

 

 

 

PART II

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Item 13.

 

Defaults, Dividend Arrearages and Delinquencies

 

96

 

 

 

 

 

Item 14.

 

Material Modifications to the Rights of Security Holders and Use of Proceeds

 

96

 

 

 

 

 

Item 15.

 

Controls and Procedures

 

96

 

 

 

 

 

Item 16A.

 

Audit Committee Financial Expert

 

96

 

 

 

 

 

Item 16B.

 

Code of Ethics

 

96

 

 

 

 

 

Item 16C.

 

Principal Accountant Fees and Services

 

96

 

 

 

 

 

Item 16D.

 

Exemptions from the Listing Standards for Audit Committees

 

97

 

 

 

 

 

Item 16E.

 

Purchases of Equity Securities by the Issuer and Affiliated Purchasers

 

97

 

 

 

 

 

Item 16F.

 

Change in Registrant’s Certifying Accountant

 

97

 

 

 

 

 

Item 16G.

 

Corporate Governance

 

98

 

 

 

 

 

Item 16H.

 

Mine Safety Disclosure

 

98

 

 

 

 

 

PART III

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Item 17.

 

Financial Statements

 

99

 

 

 

 

 

Item 18.

 

Financial Statements

 

99

 

 

 

 

 

Item 19.

 

Exhibits

 

99

 

 


INTRODUCTION

Unless otherwise indicated in this Annual Report on Form 20-F (“Annual Report”), “Pyxis,” the “Company,” “we,” “us” and “our” refer to Pyxis Tankers Inc. and its consolidated subsidiaries.

Our audited consolidated financial statements have been prepared in accordance with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles, or “U.S. GAAP” or “GAAP”.

All references in this Annual Report to “$,” “US$,” “U.S.$,” “U.S. dollars,” “dollars” and “USD” mean U.S. dollars and all references to “€” and “euros,” mean euros, unless otherwise noted.

 

 


FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS

Our disclosure and analysis in this Annual Report pertaining to our operations, cash flows and financial position, including, in particular, the likelihood of our success in developing and expanding our business and making acquisitions, include forward-looking statements within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. Statements that are predictive in nature, that depend upon or refer to future events or conditions, or that include words such as “expects,” “anticipates,” “intends,” “plans,” “believes,” “estimates,” “projects,” “forecasts,” “may,” “should” and similar expressions are forward-looking statements. All statements in this Annual Report that are not statements of either historical or current facts are forward-looking statements. Forward-looking statements include, but are not limited to, such matters as our future operating or financial results, global and regional economic and political conditions, including piracy, pending vessel acquisitions, our business strategy and expected capital spending or operating expenses, including drydocking and insurance costs, competition in the tanker industry, statements about shipping market trends, including charter rates and factors affecting supply and demand, our financial condition and liquidity, including our ability to obtain financing in the future to fund capital expenditures, acquisitions and other general corporate activities, our ability to enter into fixed-rate charters after our current charters expire and our ability to earn income in the spot market and our expectations of the availability of vessels to purchase, the time it may take to construct new vessels, and vessels’ useful lives. Many of these statements are based on our assumptions about factors that are beyond our ability to control or predict and are subject to risks and uncertainties that are described more fully under the “Item 3. Key Information – D. Risk Factors” section of this Annual Report. Any of these factors or a combination of these factors could materially affect our future results of operations and the ultimate accuracy of the forward-looking statements.

Factors that might cause future results to differ include, but are not limited to, the following:

 

·

changes in governmental rules and regulations or actions taken by regulatory authorities;

 

·

changes in economic and competitive conditions affecting our business, including market fluctuations in charter rates and charterers’ abilities to perform under existing time charters;

 

·

the length and number of off-hire periods and dependence on third-party managers; and

 

·

other factors discussed under the “Item 3. Key Information – D. Risk Factors” in this Annual Report.

You should not place undue reliance on forward-looking statements contained in this Annual Report, because they are statements about events that are not certain to occur as described or at all. All forward-looking statements in this Annual Report are qualified in their entirety by the cautionary statements contained in this Annual Report. These forward-looking statements are not guarantees of our future performance, and actual results and future developments may vary materially from those projected in the forward-looking statements. Except to the extent required by applicable law or regulation, we undertake no obligation to release publicly any revisions to these forward-looking statements to reflect events or circumstances after the date of this Annual Report or to reflect the occurrence of unanticipated events.

 

 

 

 


PART I

 

 

ITEM 1.

IDENTITY OF DIRECTORS, SENIOR MANAGEMENT AND ADVISERS

Not applicable.

 

 

ITEM 2.

OFFER STATISTICS AND EXPECTED TIMETABLE

Not applicable.

 

 

ITEM 3.

KEY INFORMATION

A.

Selected Financial Data

The following table presents in each case for the periods and at the dates indicated, selected consolidated financial and operating data of Pyxis Tankers Inc. for each of the years in the three-year period ended December 31, 2015. The table should be read together with “Item 5 - Operating and Financial Review and Prospects”. The selected consolidated financial data of Pyxis Tankers Inc. is a summary of, is derived from, and is qualified by reference to, our audited consolidated financial statements and notes thereto, which have been prepared in accordance with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles (“U.S. GAAP”). Our audited consolidated statements of income, stockholders’ equity and cash flows for the years ended December 31, 2013, 2014 and 2015 and the consolidated balance sheets at December 31, 2014 and 2015, together with the notes thereto, are included in “Item 18. Financial Statements” and should be read in their entirety.

 

 

 

Year ended December 31,

 

(In thousands of U.S. Dollars, except per share data)

 

2013

 

 

2014

 

 

2015

 

Revenue

 

$

21,980

 

 

$

27,760

 

 

 

33,170

 

Voyage related costs and commissions

 

 

(3,817

)

 

 

(10,030

)

 

 

(4,725

)

Vessel operating expenses

 

 

(10,220

)

 

 

(11,064

)

 

 

(13,188

)

General and administrative expenses

 

 

(173

)

 

 

(93

)

 

 

(1,773

)

Management fees, related parties

 

 

(468

)

 

 

(611

)

 

 

(577

)

Management fees, other

 

 

(823

)

 

 

(922

)

 

 

(1,061

)

Depreciation and amortization

 

 

(4,677

)

 

 

(5,649

)

 

 

(5,884

)

Vessel impairment charge

 

 

 

 

 

(16,930

)

 

 

 

Interest expenses and finance cost, net

 

 

(402

)

 

 

(1,704

)

 

 

(2,531

)

Other income

 

 

192

 

 

 

 

 

 

74

 

Net income/(loss)

 

$

1,592

 

 

$

(19,243

)

 

 

3,505

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Earnings/(losses) per common share, basic

 

$

0.09

 

 

$

(1.05

)

 

$

0.19

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Earnings/(losses) per common share,

   diluted

 

$

-

 

 

$

-

 

 

$

0.19

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Weighted average number of shares, basic

 

 

18,244,671

 

 

 

18,244,671

 

 

 

18,244,671

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Weighted average number of shares,

   diluted

 

 

18,244,671

 

 

 

18,244,671

 

 

 

18,277,893

 

 

 

 

Year ended December 31,

 

(In thousands of U.S. Dollars)

 

2014

 

 

2015

 

Balance Sheet Data

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total current assets

 

$

3,372

 

 

$

5,885

 

Total other non-current assets

 

 

1,122

 

 

 

5,336

 

Fixed assets, net

 

 

117,445

 

 

 

130,501

 

Total assets

 

 

121,939

 

 

 

141,722

 

Total current liabilities

 

 

7,047

 

 

 

11,200

 

Total non – current liabilities

 

 

60,991

 

 

 

75,956

 

Total stockholders’ equity

 

 

53,901

 

 

 

54,566

 

Capital Stock

 

$

72,981

 

 

$

70,141

 

 

1


 

 

Year ended December 31,

 

(In thousands of U.S. Dollars)

 

2013

 

 

2014

 

 

2015

 

Cash Flow Data

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net cash provided by operating activities

 

$

5,992

 

 

$

5,362

 

 

$

12,366

 

Net cash used in investing activities

 

 

(29,389

)

 

 

(7,156

)

 

 

(18,766

)

Net cash provided by financing activities

 

 

24,902

 

 

 

246

 

 

 

9,879

 

Change in cash and cash equivalents

 

$

1,505

 

 

$

(1,548

)

 

$

3,479

 

 

 

 

Year ended December 31,

 

 

 

2013

 

 

2014

 

 

2015

 

Ownership days (1)

 

 

1,566

 

 

 

1,825

 

 

 

2,177

 

Available days (2)

 

 

1,566

 

 

 

1,806

 

 

 

2,137

 

Operating days (3)

 

 

1,523

 

 

 

1,694

 

 

 

2,092

 

Utilization % (4)

 

 

97.2%

 

 

 

93.8%

 

 

 

97.9%

 

Daily time charter equivalent rate (5)

 

$

11,926

 

 

$

10,466

 

 

$

13,597

 

Average number of vessels (6)

 

 

4.3

 

 

 

5.0

 

 

 

6.0

 

Number of vessels at period end

 

 

5.0

 

 

 

5.0

 

 

 

6.0

 

Weighted average age of vessels (7)

 

 

4.0

 

 

 

5.0

 

 

 

4.8

 

 

(1)

Ownership days are the total number of days in a period during which each of the vessels in our fleet was owned by us. Ownership days are an indicator of the size of our fleet over a period and affect both the amount of revenues generated and the amount of expenses incurred during the respective period.

(2)

Available days are the number of ownership days in a period, less the aggregate number of days that our vessels were off-hire due to scheduled repairs or repairs under guarantee, vessel upgrades or special surveys and intermediate dry-dockings and the aggregate number of days that we spent positioning our vessels during the respective period for such repairs, upgrades and surveys. The shipping industry uses available days to measure the aggregate number of days in a period during which vessels should be capable of generating revenues.

(3)

Operating days are the number of available days in a period, less the aggregate number of days that our vessels were off-hire or out of service due to any reason, including technical breakdowns and unforeseen circumstances. The shipping industry uses operating days to measure the aggregate number of days in a period during which vessels actually generate revenues.

(4)

We calculate fleet utilization by dividing the number of operating days during a period by the number of available days during the same period. The shipping industry uses fleet utilization to measure a company’s efficiency in finding suitable employment for its vessels and minimizing the amount of days that its vessels are off-hire for reasons other than scheduled repairs or repairs under guarantee, vessel upgrades, special surveys and intermediate dry-dockings or vessel positioning.

(5)

Daily TCE is a standard shipping industry performance measure of the average daily revenue performance of a vessel on a per voyage basis. TCE is not calculated in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States (“U.S. GAAP”). We utilize TCE because we believe it is a meaningful measure to compare period-to-period changes in our performance despite changes in the mix of charter types (i.e., spot charters, time charters and bareboat charters) under which our vessels may be employed between the periods. Our management also utilizes TCE to assist them in making decisions regarding employment of the vessels. We believe that our method of calculating TCE is consistent with industry standards and is determined by dividing voyage revenues after deducting voyage expenses, including commissions by operating days for the relevant period. Voyage expenses primarily consist of brokerage commissions, port, canal and fuel costs that are unique to a particular voyage, which would otherwise be paid by the charter under a time charter contract.

(6)

Average number of vessels is the number of vessels that constituted our fleet for the relevant period, as measured by the sum of the number of days each vessel was part of our fleet during such period divided by the number of calendar days in the period.

(7)

Weighted average age of the fleet, is the sum of the ages of our vessels, weighted by the dead weight tonnage (“dwt”) of each vessel on the total fleet dwt.

2


 

Recent Daily Fleet Data:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(Amounts in U.S.$)

 

 

 

Year ended December 31,

 

 

 

 

 

2013

 

 

2014

 

 

2015

 

Eco-Efficient MR2: (2 units)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TCE

 

 

14,401

 

 

 

15,210

 

 

 

15,631

 

 

 

Opex

 

 

10,908

 

 

 

5,584

 

 

 

6,430

 

 

 

Utilization %

 

 

100.0%

 

 

 

100.0%

 

 

 

99.4%

 

Eco-Modified MR2: (1 unit)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TCE

 

 

21,114

 

 

 

12,596

 

 

 

17,480

 

 

 

Opex

 

 

6,337

 

 

 

6,802

 

 

 

6,461

 

 

 

Utilization %

 

 

100.0%

 

 

 

86.4%

 

 

 

91.3%

 

Standard MR2: (1 unit)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TCE

 

 

13,021

 

 

 

12,019

 

 

 

17,237

 

 

 

Opex

 

 

6,376

 

 

 

6,739

 

 

 

6,325

 

 

 

Utilization %

 

 

99.2%

 

 

 

95.4%

 

 

 

100.0%

 

Handysize Tankers: (2 units)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TCE

 

 

6,116

 

 

 

6,200

 

 

 

7,622

 

 

 

Opex

 

 

6,062

 

 

 

5,581

 

 

 

5,358

 

 

 

Utilization %

 

 

94.5%

 

 

 

93.4%

 

 

 

98.6%

 

Fleet: (6 units)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TCE

 

 

11,926

 

 

 

10,466

 

 

 

13,597

 

 

 

Opex

 

 

6,527

 

 

 

6,062

 

 

 

6,058

 

 

 

Utilization %

 

 

97.2%

 

 

 

93.8%

 

 

 

97.9%

 

 

Vessel operating expenses per day (“Opex”) are our vessel operating expenses for a vessel, which consist primarily of crew wages and related costs, insurance, lube oils, communications, spares and consumables, tonnage taxes as well as repairs and maintenance, divided by the days in the applicable period.

 

B.

Capitalization and Indebtedness

Not applicable.

C.

Reasons for the Offer and Use of Proceeds

Not applicable.

D.

Risk Factors

Risks Related to Our Industry

Operating ocean-going vessels is inherently risky.

The operation of ocean-going vessels in international trade is affected by a number of risks. Our vessels and their cargoes will be at risk of being damaged or lost because of events, including marine disasters, bad weather, grounding, fire explosions, collisions, human error, mechanical failure, personal injury, vessel and cargo and property loss or damage, hostilities, labor strikes, adverse weather conditions, stowaways, placement on our vessels of illegal drugs and other contraband by smugglers, war, terrorism, piracy, human error, environmental accidents generally, collisions and other catastrophic natural and marine disasters. An accident involving any of our vessels could result in death or injury to persons, loss of property or environmental damage, delays in the delivery of cargo, damage to our customer relationships, loss of revenues from or termination of charter contracts, governmental fines, penalties or restrictions on conducting business or higher insurance rates.

In addition, the operation of tankers, and product tankers in particular, has unique operational risks associated with the transportation of refined petroleum products and chemicals. A spill of refined petroleum products or chemicals may cause significant environmental damage, and a catastrophic spill could exceed the insurance coverage available. We could also become subject to personal injury or property damage claims relating to the release of or exposure to hazardous materials associated with our operations. Violations of or liabilities under environmental requirements also can result in substantial penalties, fines and other sanctions, including in certain instances, seizure or detention of our vessels. Compared to other types of vessels, product tankers are exposed to a higher risk of damage and loss by fire, whether ignited by a terrorist attack, collision or other cause due to the high flammability and

3


high volume of the products transported in tankers. In addition, if our vessels are found with contraband, we may face governmental or other regulatory claims. Any of these circumstances or events could negatively impact our business, results of operations and financial condition. In addition, the loss of any of our vessels could harm our reputation as a safe and reliable vessel owner and operator.

If our vessels suffer damage, they may need to be repaired at a shipyard. The costs of repairs are unpredictable and may be substantial. We may have to pay repairs that our insurance does not cover in full. In addition, we may be unable to find space at a suitable shipyard or our vessels may be forced to travel to a shipyard that is not conveniently located to our vessels’ positions. The loss of revenues and continuation of certain operating expenses while these vessels are being repaired and repositioned, as well as the actual cost of these repairs, may adversely affect our business and financial conditions. Further, the total loss of any of our vessels could harm our reputation as a safe and reliable vessel owner and operator.

We operate our vessels worldwide and as a result, our vessels are exposed to international risks that may reduce revenue or increase expenses.

The international shipping industry is an inherently risky business involving global operations.  In addition to the circumstances and events summarized above, changing economic, regulatory and political conditions in some countries, including political and military conflicts, have from time to time resulted in attacks on vessels, mining of waterways, piracy, terrorism, labor strikes and boycotts. These sorts of events could interfere with shipping routes and result in market disruptions that may reduce our revenue or increase our expenses. International shipping is also subject to various security and customs inspection and related procedures in countries of origin and destination and transhipment points. Inspection procedures can result in the seizure of the cargo and/or our vessels, delays in the loading, offloading or delivery and the levying of customs duties, fines or other penalties against us. It is possible that changes to inspection procedures could impose additional financial and legal obligations on us. Furthermore, changes to inspection procedures could also impose additional costs and obligations on our customers and may, in certain cases, render the shipment of certain types of cargo uneconomical or impractical. Any such changes or developments may have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations, cash flows and financial condition.

Charter hire rates for tankers are cyclical and volatile.

The product tanker market is cyclical and volatile in charter hire rates. The degree of charter hire rate volatility among different types of product tankers has varied widely. After reaching historical highs in mid-2008, charter hire rates for product tankers declined significantly before increasing in 2015. If the shipping industry and charter hire rates are depressed in the future when our charters expire, we may be unable to recharter our vessels at rates as favorable to us as historical rates and our revenues, with the result that earnings and available cash flow will likely be adversely affected. In addition, a decline in charter hire rates likely will cause the value of our vessels to decline. Our ability to re-charter our vessels upon the expiration or termination of our current charters, the charter rates payable under any replacement charters and vessel values will depend upon, among other things, economic conditions in the tanker market at that time and changes in the supply and demand for vessel capacity.

The factors that influence the demand for product tanker vessel capacity are outside of our control, unpredictable and include:

 

·

demand and supply for refined petroleum products and other liquid bulk products such as vegetable and edible oils;

 

·

competition from alternative sources of energy and a shift in consumer demand from products towards other energy resources such as wind, solar or water energy;

 

·

regional availability of refining capacity;

 

·

the globalization of manufacturing;

 

·

global and regional economic and political conditions and developments in international trade;

 

·

changes in seaborne and other transportation patterns, including changes in the distances over which tanker cargoes are transported;

 

·

competition from other shipping companies and other modes of transportation that compete with product tankers;

 

·

environmental and other regulatory developments;

 

·

international sanctions, embargoes, import and export restrictions, nationalizations and wars;

 

·

currency exchange rates; and

 

·

weather and natural disasters.

4


The factors that influence the supply of product tanker vessel capacity are outside of our control and unpredictable and include:

 

·

the number of product tanker newbuilding deliveries;

 

·

the scrapping rate of older product tankers;

 

·

the price of steel and vessel equipment;

 

·

the cost of newbuildings and the cost of retrofitting or modifying secondhand product tankers as a result of charterer requirements;

 

·

availability and cost of capital;

 

·

cost and supply of labor;

 

·

technological advances in product tanker design and capacity;

 

·

conversion of product tankers to other uses and the conversion of other vessels to product tankers;

 

·

product tankers freight rates, which is itself effected by factors that may affect the rate of newbuilding, scrapping and laying-up of product tankers;

 

·

port and canal congestion;

 

·

exchange rate fluctuations;

 

·

changes in environmental and other regulations that may limit the useful lives of product tankers; and

 

·

the number of product tankers that are out of service.

These factors influencing the supply of and demand for product tanker capacity and charter rates are outside of our control, and we may not be able to correctly assess the nature, timing and degree of changes in industry conditions. A global economic downturn may reduce demand for transportation of refined petroleum products and chemicals.  We cannot assure you that we will be able to successfully charter our product tankers in the future at all or at rates sufficient to allow us to meet our contractual obligations, including repayment of our indebtedness, or to pay dividends to our stockholders.

Product tanker rates also fluctuate based on seasonal variations in demand.

Product tanker markets are typically stronger in the winter months as a result of increased refined petroleum products consumption in the northern hemisphere but weaker in the summer months as a result of lower products consumption in the northern hemisphere and refinery maintenance that is typically conducted in the summer months. In addition, unpredictable weather patterns during the winter months in the northern hemisphere tend to disrupt vessel routing and scheduling. The price volatility of products resulting from these factors has historically led to increased product trading activities in the winter months. As a result, revenues generated by our vessels have been historically weaker during the quarters ended June 30 and September 30, and stronger in the quarters ended March 31 and December 31.

An over-supply of product tanker capacity may lead to reductions in charter rates, vessel values, and profitability.

The market supply of product tankers is affected by a number of factors such as demand for energy resources, oil, petroleum and chemical products, as well as strong overall global economic growth. If the capacity of new ships delivered exceeds the capacity of product tankers being scrapped and lost, product tanker capacity will increase. For example, as of March 15, 2016, the order book for MR tankers represented slightly over 7.9% of the existing fleet and the order book may increase further in the future. If the supply of product tanker capacity increases and if the demand for product tanker capacity does not increase correspondingly, charter rates and vessel values could materially decline. A reduction in charter rates and the value of our vessels may have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition.

Acts of piracy on ocean-going vessels could adversely affect our business.

Acts of piracy have historically affected ocean-going vessels trading in many regions of the world. Although the frequency of piracy on ocean-going vessels has decreased since 2014, piracy incidents continue to occur, particularly in the Gulf of Aden off the coast of Somalia and the Gulf of Guinea. Tanker vessels are particularly vulnerable to attacks by pirates. If regions in which our vessels are deployed are characterized as “war risk’’ zones by insurers, as the Gulf of Aden temporarily was in May 2008, or Joint War Committee of Lloyds Insurance and IUA Company “war and strikes’’ listed areas, premiums payable for coverage could increase significantly and such insurance coverage may be more difficult to obtain. In addition, crew costs, including employing onboard security guards, could increase in such circumstances. We may not be adequately insured to cover losses from these incidents. In

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addition, any detention hijacking as a result of an act of piracy against our vessels, or an increase in cost, or unavailability, of insurance for our vessels.  These risks could have a material adverse impact on our business, results of operations and financial condition.

Our substantial operations outside the United States expose us to political, governmental and economic instability.

Our operations are primarily conducted outside the United States and may be adversely affected by changing or adverse political, governmental and economic conditions in the countries where our vessels are flagged or registered and in the regions where we operate. In particular, we may derive some portion of our revenues from our vessels transporting refined petroleum products from politically unstable regions.

In addition, terrorist attacks such as the attacks that occurred against targets in the United States on September 11, 2001, Spain on March 11, 2004, London on July 7, 2005, Mumbai on November 26, 2008, Paris on November 13, 2015 and continuing hostilities in Iraq, Syria and Afghanistan and elsewhere in the Middle East and the world may lead to additional armed conflicts or to further acts of terrorism and civil disturbance. Our operations may also be adversely affected by expropriation of vessels, taxes, regulation, tariffs, trade embargoes, economic sanctions, or a disruption of or limit to trading activities or other adverse events or circumstances in or affecting the countries and regions where we operate or where we may operate in the future. Crew costs, including due to employing onboard security guards, could increase in such circumstances. We may not be adequately insured to cover losses from these incidents.

Our operations are also potentially vulnerable to economic instability inherent in political and government risk. In particular, the shipping industry, like many others, is dependent on the economies of India and China. India’s gross domestic product growth has exhibited noteworthy growth in the recent years. The Chinese government’s reputation and reform of its economy continue to develop. Many of the reforms by the Chinese government are unprecedented or experimental and may be subject to revision, change or abolition based upon the outcome of such experiments. Notwithstanding these developments, the Chinese economy has slowed its pace of growth in the recent past.

In addition, fluctuations in exchange rates may affect charter rates and may adversely affect the profitability in U.S. dollars of the services we provide in foreign markets where payment is made in other currencies. All of our consolidated revenue is received in U.S. dollars. The amount and frequency of expenses paid in currency other than the U.S. dollar (such as vessel repairs, supplies and stores) may fluctuate from period to period. Depreciation in the value of the U.S. dollar relative to other currencies increases the U.S. dollar cost to us. The portion of our business conducted in other currencies could increase in the future, which could expand our exposure to losses arising from currency fluctuations, including the continued devaluation of the yuan by the People’s Bank of China that commenced in August 2015. Even if we implement hedging strategies to mitigate this risk, these strategies might not eliminate our exposure to foreign exchange rate fluctuations and would involve costs and risks of their own, such as ongoing management time and expertise, external costs to implement the hedging activities and potential accounting implications.

Political instability in Greece may have an adverse impact on our and Pyxis Maritime Corp.’s (“Maritime”) operations in that country. We are headquartered in Greece, which is in the midst of an economic crisis that includes, among other things, a high budget deficit compared to previous years. The Greek government is adopting reforms, and it is not clear how this new legislation will be implemented in practice. On August 19, 2015, the European Commission signed a Memorandum of Understanding (the “MoU”) with Greece following approval by the European Stability Mechanism Board of Governors for further stability support accompanied by a third economic adjustment program. Within the scope of the MoU, the Greek government has committed to phasing out special tax treatments of the shipping industry. Over the past recent years, Greece has subjected foreign flag vessels (jointly with their owners and their Greek ship managers) to tonnage tax equal to that payable for equivalent Greek flag vessels, on condition of providing a tax credit for the equivalent taxes actually incurred in respect of the same vessels towards their flag states. Greece has also enacted legislation increasing the levels of tonnage tax by 4% until 2020 in conformity with the MoU. As part of those reforms, the government in Greece may impose additional taxes on ship management companies located in Greece, including on shipping income which currently benefits from an exemption from Greek taxes.

Any of these factors may interfere with the operation of our vessels, increase the cost and risk that insurance will be unavailable, insufficient or more expensive for our vessels and increase our costs, which could harm our business, results of operations and financial condition.

The current global economic condition and financial environment may negatively affect our business.

In recent years, businesses in the global economy generally have suffered from a general recession, faced limited or no credit or credit on less favorable terms than previously obtained, lower demand for goods and services, reduced liquidity and declining capital markets. These factors have led to lower demand for refined petroleum products including fuel oil, which, along with diminished trade credit available for the delivery of such cargoes have led to decreased demand for product tankers, creating downward pressure on charter rates and reduced product tanker values. In particular, a significant number of the port calls we expect our vessels to make will

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likely involve the loading or discharging of cargo in ports in Organization of Economic Cooperation and Development countries and the Asia Pacific region. China’s economy has shown signs of slowing its growth rate. We cannot assure you that the Chinese, Indian or Japanese economies, which generate a substantial amount of demand for shipping companies, will not experience a significant contraction or otherwise negatively change in the future, especially due to the recent effects from the turmoil in the Chinese capital markets. Moreover, a significant or protracted slowdown in the economies of the United States, the European Union or various Asian countries may adversely affect the economic growth in China and elsewhere. In addition, concerns persist regarding the debt burden of certain Eurozone countries and their ability to meet future financial obligations and the overall stability of the Euro. An extended period of adverse development in the outlook for European countries could reduce the overall demand for our services.

These issues, along with the re-pricing of credit risk and the difficulties currently experienced by financial institutions have made, and will likely continue to make it difficult to obtain financing. As a result of the disruptions in the credit markets and higher capital requirements, many lenders have increased margins on lending rates, enacted tighter lending standards, required more restrictive terms (including higher collateral ratios for advances, shorter maturities and smaller loan amounts), or have refused to refinance existing debt at all. Furthermore, certain banks that have historically been significant lenders to the shipping industry have reduced or ceased lending activities in the shipping industry. Additional tightening of capital requirements and the resulting policies adopted by lenders, could further reduce lending activities.

If the current global economic and financial environment persists or worsens, we may be negatively affected in the following ways:

 

·

we may not be able to employ our vessels at charter rates as favorable to us as historical rates or operate our vessels profitably;

 

·

the market value of our vessels could decrease, which may cause us to, among other things, recognize losses if any of our vessels are sold or if their values are impaired, violate covenants in our current loan agreements and future financing agreements and be unable to incur debt at all or on terms that are acceptable to us; and

 

·

we may experience difficulties obtaining financing commitments or be unable to fully draw under loans we arrange in the future if the lenders are unwilling to extend financing to us or unable to meet their funding obligations due to their own liquidity, capital or solvency issues. We cannot be certain that financing will be available on acceptable terms or at all. If financing is not available when needed, or is available only on unfavorable terms, we may be unable to meet our future obligations as they come due. In the absence of available financing, we also may be unable to take advantage of business opportunities or respond to competitive pressures.

In addition, as a result of the ongoing economic slump in Greece and the related austerity measures implemented by the Greek government, our and Maritime’s operations in Greece will likely be subjected to new regulations that will require us to incur new or additional compliance or other administrative costs and may require that they pay to the Greek government new taxes or other fees as described above. Furthermore, the continuing debt crisis in Greece and a possible default in the future may undermine Greece’s political and economic stability and may lead it to exit the Eurozone, which may adversely affect our and Maritime’s operations located in Greece. Even though the Greek government has enacted measures to ease the flow of foreign funds transferred to Greece, we also face the risk that continued capital controls on banking deposits with Greek financial institutions and future strikes, work stoppages, civil unrest within Greece may disrupt our shore-side operations and those of Maritime’s employees located in Greece.

The occurrence of any of the foregoing could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition.

Changes in fuel, or bunkers, prices may adversely affect profits.

Fuel, or bunkers, is a significant expense in shipping operations for our vessels employed on the spot market and can have a significant impact on earnings. With respect to our vessels employed on time charter, the charterer is generally responsible for the cost and supply of fuel, but such cost may affect the charter rates we are able to negotiate for our vessels. The price and supply of fuel is unpredictable and fluctuates based on events outside our control, including geopolitical developments, supply and demand for oil and gas, actions by OPEC and other oil and gas producers, war and unrest in oil producing countries and regions, regional production patterns and environmental concerns. Further, fuel may become much more expensive in the future, which may reduce the profitability and competitiveness of our business versus other forms of transportation, such as truck or rail. Changes in the price of fuel may adversely affect our profitability.

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If our vessels call on ports located in countries that are subject to restrictions imposed by the U.S. government, our reputation and the market for our common stock could be adversely affected.

Although no vessels owned or operated by us have called on ports located in countries subject to sanctions and embargoes imposed by the U.S. government and other authorities or countries identified by the U.S. government or other authorities as state sponsors of terrorism, such as Cuba, Iran, Sudan, and Syria, in the future, our vessels may call on ports in these countries from time to time on charterers’ instructions in violation of contractual provisions that prohibit them from doing so. Sanctions and embargo laws and regulations vary in their application, as they do not all apply to the same covered persons or proscribe the same activities, and such sanctions and embargo laws and regulations may be amended or strengthened over time. In 2010, the United States enacted the Comprehensive Iran Sanctions Accountability and Divestment Act (“CISADA”), which expanded the scope of the Iran Sanctions Act. Among other things, CISADA expands the application of the prohibitions on companies, such as us, and introduces limits on the ability of companies and persons to do business or trade with Iran when such activities relate to the investment, supply or export of refined petroleum or petroleum products.

In 2012, President Barack Obama signed Executive Order 13608, which prohibits foreign persons from violating or attempting to violate, or causing a violation of any sanctions in effect against Iran or facilitating any deceptive transactions for or on behalf of any person subject to U.S. sanctions. Any persons found to be in violation of Executive Order 13608 will be deemed a foreign sanctions evader and will be banned from all contact with the United States, including conducting business in U.S. dollars. Also in 2012, President Obama signed into law the Iran Threat Reduction and Syria Human Rights Act of 2012 (the “Iran Threat Reduction Act”), which created new sanctions and strengthened existing sanctions. Among other things, the Iran Threat Reduction Act intensifies existing sanctions regarding the provision of goods, services, infrastructure or technology to Iran’s petroleum or petrochemical sector. The Iran Threat Reduction Act also includes a provision requiring the President of the United States to impose five or more sanctions from Section 6(a) of the Iran Sanctions Act, as amended, on a person the President determines is a controlling beneficial owner of, or otherwise owns, operates, or controls or insures a vessel that was used to transport crude oil from Iran to another country and (1) if the person is a controlling beneficial owner of the vessel, the person had actual knowledge the vessel was so used or (2) if the person otherwise owns, operates, or controls, or insures the vessel, the person knew or should have known the vessel was so used. Such a person could be subject to a variety of sanctions, including exclusion from U.S. capital markets, financial transactions subject to U.S. jurisdiction, and that person’s vessels from U.S. ports for up to two years.

On November 24, 2013, the P5+1 (the United States, United Kingdom, Germany, France, Russia and China) entered into an interim agreement with Iran entitled the Joint Plan of Action (“JPOA”). Under the JPOA, it was agreed that, in exchange for Iran taking certain voluntary measures to ensure that its nuclear program is used only for peaceful purposes, the United States and European Union would voluntarily suspend certain sanctions for a period of six months.

On January 20, 2014, the United States and European Union indicated that they would begin implementing the temporary relief measures provided for under the JPOA. These measures include, among other things, the suspension of certain sanctions on the Iranian petrochemicals, precious metals, and automotive industries, initially for the six-month period beginning January 20, 2014 and ending July 20, 2014. The JPOA has since been extended on multiple occasions.

On July 14, 2015, the P5+1 and the European Union announced that they reached a landmark agreement with Iran titled the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action Regarding the Islamic Republic of Iran’s Nuclear Program (the “JCPOA”), which is intended to significantly restrict Iran’s ability to develop and produce nuclear weapons for ten years while simultaneously easing sanctions directed toward non-U.S. persons for conduct involving Iran, but taking place outside of U.S. jurisdiction and does not involve U.S. persons. On January 16, 2016 (“Implementation Day”), the United States joined the European Union and the United Nations in lifting a significant number of their nuclear-related sanctions on Iran following an announcement by the International Atomic Energy Agency (“IAEA”), that Iran had satisfied its respective obligations under the JCPOA.

U.S. sanctions prohibiting certain conduct that is now permitted under the JCPOA have not actually been repealed or permanently terminated at this time. Rather, the U.S. government has implemented changes to the sanctions regime by: (1) issuing waivers of certain statutory sanctions provisions; (2) committing to refrain from exercising certain discretionary sanctions authorities; (3) removing certain individuals and entities from OFAC's sanctions lists; and (4) revoking certain Executive Orders and specified sections of Executive Orders. These sanctions will not be permanently "lifted" until the earlier of “Transition Day,” set to occur on October 20, 2023, or upon a report from the IAEA stating that all nuclear material in Iran is being used for peaceful activities.

Although we believe that we have been in compliance with all applicable sanctions and embargo laws and regulations, and intend to maintain such compliance, there can be no assurance that we will be in compliance in the future, particularly as the scope of certain laws may be unclear and may be subject to changing interpretations. Any such violation could result in fines, penalties or other sanctions that could severely impact our ability to access U.S. capital markets and conduct our business, and could result in some investors deciding, or being required, to divest their interest, or not to invest, in us. Moreover, our charterers may violate applicable sanctions and embargo laws and regulations as a result of actions that do not involve us or our vessels, and those violations could in

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turn negatively affect our reputation. In addition, our reputation and the market for our securities may be adversely affected if we engage in certain other activities, such as engaging in operations under an otherwise lawful contract or transaction with a third party which separately and subsequently becomes involved in sanctionable conduct.

Our vessels could be arrested by maritime claimants, which could result in a significant loss of earnings and cash flow if we are not able to post the required security to lift the arrest.

Generally under the terms of the time charters for our vessels, a vessel would be placed off-hire (that is, the charterer could cease to pay charterhire) for any period during which it is “arrested” for a reason not arising from the fault of the charterer. Under maritime law in many jurisdictions, and under the International Convention on Arrest of Ships, 1999, crew members, tort claimants, claimants for breach of certain maritime contracts, vessel mortgagees, suppliers of goods and services to a vessel and shippers and consignees of cargo and others entitled to a maritime lien against the vessel may enforce their lien by “arresting” a vessel through court processes. In addition, claims may be brought by parties in hostile jurisdictions or on fictitious grounds or for claims against previous owners, if any, or in respect of previous cargoes. Any such claims could lead to the arrest of the vessel, against which the ship owner would have to post security to have the arrest lifted and to defend against such claims.

In addition, in those countries adopting the International Convention on Arrest of Ships, 1999, and in certain other jurisdictions, such as South Africa, under the “sister ship” theory of liability, a claimant may arrest not only the vessel with respect to which the claimant’s maritime lien has arisen, but also any “associated” vessel owned or controlled by the legal or beneficial owner of that vessel. While in some of the jurisdictions which have adopted this doctrine, liability for damages is limited in scope and would only extend to a company and its vessel owning subsidiaries, there can be no assurance that liability for damages caused by a vessel managed by International Tanker Management (“ITM”) our technical manager (but otherwise with no affiliation at all to us), would not be asserted against us or one or more of our vessels. The arrest of one or more vessels in our fleet could result in a material loss of cash flow for us and/or require us to pay substantial sums to have the arrest lifted.

Governments could requisition our vessels during a period of war or emergency.

A government could take actions for requisition of title, hire or seize our vessels. Requisition for title occurs when a government takes control of a vessel and becomes its owner. Also, a government could requisition our vessels for hire. Requisition for hire occurs when a government takes control of a vessel and effectively becomes her charterer at dictated charter rates. Generally, requisitions occur during a period of war or emergency. Government requisition of one or more of our vessels could negatively impact our business, results of operations and financial condition.

Environmental, safety and other increasingly strict governmental regulations expose us to liability and significant additional expenditures.

Our operations are affected by extensive and changing international, national and local environmental protection laws, regulations, treaties, conventions and standards in force in international waters, the jurisdictional waters of the countries in which our vessels operate, as well as the countries of our vessels’ registration. One such example is the International Convention for the Control and Management of Ships’ Ballast Water and Sediments (“BWM Convention”), which calls for a phased introduction of mandatory ballast water exchange requirements to be replaced in time with mandatory concentration limits. Please see our discussion of the International Maritime Organization in Item 4 of this Annual Report for further discussion on the BWM Convention. Although the BWM Convention has not yet been ratified, it is expected that once ratified, ballast water treatment systems will be required to be installed on vessels at the first renewal survey following the entry into force of this convention. These and other requirements imposed by such environmental, safety and other regulations can affect the resale value or useful lives of our vessels, require costly vessel modifications or operational changes or restrictions, a reduction in cargo-capacity, or result in the denial of access to certain jurisdictional waters or ports, or detention in, certain ports. In addition, ship owners incur significant costs in complying with the regulations summarized above and in meeting maintenance and inspection requirements and in developing contingency arrangements for potential environmental damages such as spills. Government regulation of vessels, particularly in the areas of safety and environmental requirements, can be expected to become stricter in the future and require us to incur significant capital expenditure on our vessels to keep them in compliance, even to scrap or sell certain vessels altogether and generally to increase our compliance costs.

We are subject to complex laws and regulations, including environmental laws and regulations, which can adversely affect our business, results of operations and financial condition.

Our operations are subject to numerous laws and regulations in the form of international conventions and treaties, national, state and local laws and national and international regulations in force in the jurisdictions in which our vessels operate or are registered, which can significantly affect the ownership and operation of our vessels. These requirements include, but are not limited to, the U.S. Oil Pollution Act of 1990 (“OPA”), requirements of the U.S Coast Guard and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (“EPA”), the U.S. Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act of 1980 (“CERCLA”), the U.S. Clean Air Act, the

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U.S. Clean Water Act, the International Maritime Organization (“IMO”), International Convention on Civil Liability for Oil Pollution Damage of 1969 (as from time to time amended and generally referred to as “CLC”), the IMO International Convention on Civil Liability for Bunker Oil Pollution Damages (the “Bunker Convention”), the IMO International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution from Ships of 1973 (as from time to time amended and generally referred to as “MARPOL”), including designation of Emission Control Areas thereunder, the IMO International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea of 1974 (as from time to time amended and generally referred to as the “SOLAS Convention”), the BWM Convention, the IMO International Convention on Load Lines of 1966 (as from time to time amended), the U.S. Maritime Transportation Security Act of 2002, the International Labour Organization (“ILO”) Maritime Labour Convention (“MLC”) and European Union regulations. Compliance with such laws and regulations, where applicable, may require installation of costly equipment or operational changes and may affect the resale value or useful lives of our vessels. We may also incur additional costs in order to comply with other existing and future regulatory obligations, including, but not limited to, costs relating to air emissions including greenhouse gases, the management of ballast and bilge waters, maintenance and inspection, elimination of tin-based paint, development and implementation of emergency procedures and insurance coverage or other financial assurance of our ability to address pollution incidents. The 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico may also result in additional regulatory initiatives or statutes or changes to existing laws that may affect our operations or require us to incur additional expenses to comply with such new laws or regulations.

These costs could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition. A failure to comply with applicable laws and regulations may result in administrative and civil penalties, criminal sanctions or the suspension or termination of its operations. Environmental laws often impose strict liability for remediation of spills and releases of oil and hazardous substances, which could subject us to liability without regard to whether it was negligent or at fault. Under OPA, for example, owners, operators and bareboat charterers are jointly and severally strictly liable for the discharge of oil in U.S. waters, including the 200-nautical mile exclusive economic zone around the United States. An oil spill could also result in significant liability, including fines, penalties, criminal liability and remediation costs for natural resource damages under other international and U.S. federal, state and local laws, as well as third-party damages, and could harm our reputation with current or potential charterers of its tankers. We are required to satisfy insurance and financial responsibility requirements for potential oil (including marine fuel) spills and other pollution incidents. Although we have arranged insurance to cover certain environmental risks, there can be no assurance that such insurance will be sufficient to cover all such risks or that any claims will not have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition.

The failure to maintain class certifications of authorized classification societies on one or more of our vessels would affect our ability to employ such vessels.

The hull and machinery of every commercial vessel must be certified as meeting its class requirements by a classification society authorized by the vessel’s country of registry. The classification society certifies that the vessel is safe and seaworthy in accordance with the applicable rules and regulations of the country of registry of the vessel and the SOLAS Convention. The operating vessels in our fleet are classed by the major classification societies, Nippon Kaiji Kyokai (Class NK) and Det Norske Veritas. ITM, our technical manager, and the vessels in our fleet have also been awarded ISM certifications from major classification societies. In order for a vessel to maintain its classification, the vessel must undergo annual surveys, intermediate surveys and special surveys. In lieu of a special survey, a vessel’s machinery may be on a continuous survey cycle under which the machinery would be surveyed from time to time over a five year period. All of the vessels in our fleet on time charters or operating on the spot market are on special survey cycles for both hull and machinery inspection. Every vessel may also be required to be drydocked every two to three years for inspection of the underwater parts of the vessel. If a vessel fails any survey or otherwise fails to maintain its class, the vessel will be unable to trade and will be unemployable, and may subject us to claims from the charterer if it has chartered the vessel, which would negatively impact our revenues as well as our reputation.

If we fail to comply with international safety regulations, we may be subject to increased liability, which may adversely affect our insurance coverage and may result in a denial of access to, or detention in, certain ports.

The operation of our vessels is affected by the requirements set forth in the IMO’s International Management Code for the Safe Operation of Ships and Pollution Prevention (“ISM Code”), promulgated by the IMO under the SOLAS Convention. The ISM Code requires ship owners, ship managers and bareboat charterers to develop and maintain an extensive “Safety Management System” that includes the adoption of safety and environmental protection policies setting forth instructions and procedures for safe operation and describing procedures for dealing with emergencies. If we fail to comply with the ISM Code, we may be subject to increased liability, invalidation of our existing insurance, or reduction in available insurance coverage for our affected vessels. Such noncompliance may also result in a denial of access to, or detention in, certain ports.

We could be adversely affected by violations of the U.S. Foreign Corrupt Practices Act and similar worldwide anti-bribery laws.

The U.S. Foreign Corrupt Practices Act and similar worldwide anti-bribery laws generally prohibit companies and their intermediaries from making improper payments to non-U.S. officials for the purpose of obtaining or retaining business. Our policies

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mandate compliance with these laws. In certain circumstances, third parties may request our employees and agents to make payments that may not comply with the U.S. Foreign Corrupt Practices Act and other anti-bribery laws. Despite such compliance program, we cannot assure you that our internal control policies and procedures always will protect us from reckless or negligent acts committed by our employees or agents. Violations of these laws, or allegations of such violations, could have a negative impact on our business, results of operations and financial condition.

We are subject to funding calls by our protection and indemnity associations, and our associations may not have enough resources to cover claims made against them.

We are indemnified for certain liabilities incurred while operating our vessels through membership in protection and indemnity associations, which are mutual insurance associations whose members contribute to cover losses sustained by other association members. Claims are paid through the aggregate premiums (typically annually) of all members of the association, although members remain subject to calls for additional funds if the aggregate premiums are insufficient to cover claims submitted to the association. Claims submitted to the association may include those incurred by members of the association, as well as claims submitted to the association from other protection and indemnity associations with which our association has entered into interassociation agreements. We cannot assure you that the associations to which we belong will remain viable.

We must protect the safety and condition of the cargoes transported on our vessels and any failure to do so may subject us to claims for loss or damage.

Under our time charters and on the spot market, we are responsible for the safekeeping of cargo entrusted to us and must properly maintain and control equipment and other apparatus to ensure that cargo is not lost or damaged in transit. Claims and any liability for loss or damage to cargo that is not covered by insurance could harm our reputation and adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

We may face labor interruptions.

A majority of the crew members on the vessels in our fleet that are under time or spot charters are employed under collective bargaining agreements. ITM, our technical manager, is a party to some of these collective bargaining agreements. These collective bargaining agreements and any employment arrangements with crew members on the vessels in our fleet may not prevent labor interruptions and are subject to renegotiation in the future. Any labor interruptions, including due to failure to successfully renegotiate collective bargaining employment agreements with the crew members on the vessels in our fleet, could disrupt our operations and could adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

Technological innovation could reduce our charter hire income and the value of our vessels.

The charterhire rates and the value and operational life of a vessel are determined by a number of factors including the vessel’s efficiency, operational flexibility and physical life. Efficiency includes speed, fuel economy and the ability to load and discharge cargo quickly. Flexibility includes the ability to enter harbors, utilize related docking facilities and pass through canals and straits. The length of a vessel’s physical life is related to its original design and construction, its maintenance, the impact of the stress of operations and stipulations from classification societies. If new product tankers are built that are more efficient or more flexible or have longer physical lives than our vessels, competition from these more technologically advanced vessels could adversely affect the amount of charterhire payments we receive for our vessels once their initial charters expire and the resale value of their vessels could significantly decrease. As a result, our financial condition and available cash could be adversely affected.

Risks Related to Our Business and Operations  

We operate in highly competitive international markets.

The product tanker industry is highly fragmented, with many charterers, owners and operators of vessels, and the transportation of refined petroleum products is characterized by intense competition. Competition arises primarily from other tanker owners, including major oil companies as well as independent tanker companies, some of which have substantially greater financial and other resources than we do. Although we believe that no single competitor has a dominant position in the markets in which we compete, the trend towards consolidation in the industry is creating an increasing number of global enterprises capable of competing in multiple markets, which will likely result in greater competition to us. Our competitors may be better positioned to devote greater resources to the development, promotion and employment of their businesses than we are. Competition for charters, including for the transportation of refined petroleum products, is intense and depends on price as well as on vessel location, size, age, condition and acceptability of the vessel and its operator to the charterer and reputation. Competition may increase in some or all of our principal markets, including with the entry of new competitors. We may not be able to compete successfully or effectively with our competitors

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and our competitive position may be eroded in the future, which could have an adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

Because we intend to charter some of the vessels in our fleet on the spot market or in pools trading in the spot market, we expect to have exposure to the cyclicality and volatility of the spot charter market.

The spot market is highly competitive and volatile, and spot charter rates may fluctuate dramatically based on the competitive factors listed in the preceding risk factor. Significant fluctuations in spot charter rates may result in significant fluctuations in our ability to continuously recharter our vessels upon the expiration or termination of their current spot charters and in the earnings of our vessels operating on the spot market. Since we charter some of our vessels on the spot market, and may in the future also admit our vessels in pools trading on the spot market, we have exposure to the cyclicality and volatility of the spot charter market. By focusing the employment of some of the vessels in our fleet on the spot market, we will benefit if conditions in this market strengthen. However, we will also be particularly vulnerable to declining spot charter rates. Future spot charters may not be available at the rates currently prevailing in the spot market or that will allow us to operate our vessels profitably. When spot charter rates decrease, our earnings will be adversely impacted to the extent we have vessels trading on the spot market.

We may be unable to secure medium- and long-term employment for our vessels at profitable rates.

One of our strategies is to explore and selectively enter into or renew medium- and long-term, fixed rate time and bareboat charters for some of the vessels in our fleet in order to provide us with a base of stable cash flows and to manage charter rate volatility. However, the process for obtaining longer term charters is highly competitive and generally involves a more lengthy and intense screening and vetting process and the submission of competitive bids, compared to shorter term charters. In addition to the quality, age and suitability of the vessel, longer term charters tend to be awarded based upon a variety of other factors relating to the vessel operator, including: the operator’s environmental, health and safety record; shipping industry relationships, reputation for customer service, technical and operating expertise and safety record; shipping experience and quality of ship operations, including cost-effectiveness; quality, experience and technical capability of crews; the ability to finance vessels at competitive rates and overall financial stability; relationships with shipyards and the ability to obtain suitable berths with on-time delivery of new vessels according to customer’s specifications; willingness to accept operational risks pursuant to the charter, such as allowing termination of the charter for force majeure events; and competitiveness of the bid in terms of overall price. We cannot assure you that we would be successful in winning medium and long term employment for our vessels at profitable rates.

Our ability to obtain new customers will depend upon a number of factors, many of which are beyond our control.

Our ability to obtain new customers will depend upon a number of factors, many of which are beyond our control. These include our ability to: successfully manage our liquidity and obtain the necessary financing to fund our anticipated growth; attract, hire, train and retain qualified personnel and technical managers to manage and operate our fleet; identify and consummate desirable acquisitions, joint ventures or strategic alliances; and identify and capitalize on opportunities in new markets. ITM, our technical manager, may not be approved through the vessel vetting process of certain charterers, thereby limiting our ability to develop new customers. It is likely that we will face substantial competition for medium- and long-term employment from a number of experienced shipping companies, many of which may have significantly greater financial and other resources than we do. Increased competition may cause greater price competition. As a result of these factors, we may be unable to expand our relationships with existing customers or obtain new customers for medium- and long-term charters on a profitable basis, if at all.

We may not be able to successfully mix our charter durations profitably.

It may be difficult to properly balance charter and spot business and anticipate trends in these sectors. If we are successful in employing vessels under medium- and long-term charters, those vessels will not be available for the spot market during an upturn in the tanker market cycle, when spot trading may be more profitable. By contrast, at the expiration of our charters, if a charter terminates early for any reason or if we acquire vessels charter-free, we may want to charter or re-charter our vessels under medium- and long-term charters. Should more vessels be available on the spot or short-term market at the time we are seeking to fix new medium- to long-term charters, we may have difficulty entering into such charters at profitable rates and for any term other than a short-term and, as a result, our cash flow may be subject to instability. A more active short-term or spot market may require us to enter into charters on all our vessels based on fluctuating market rates, as opposed to long-term contracts based on a fixed rate, which could result in a decrease in our cash flow in periods when the charter rates for tankers are depressed. If we cannot successfully employ our vessels in a profitable mix of medium- and long-term charters and on the spot market, our business, results of operations and financial condition could be adversely affected.

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Counterparties, including charterers or technical managers, could fail to meet their obligations to us.

We enter into with third parties, among other things, memoranda of agreement, charter parties, ship management agreements and loan agreements with respect to the purchase and operation of our fleet and our business. Such agreements subject us to counterparty risks. In particular, we face credit risk with our charterers. It is possible that not all of our charterers will provide detailed financial information regarding their operations. As a result, charterer risk is largely assessed on the basis of our charterers’ reputation in the market, and even on that basis, there can be no assurance that they can or will fulfill their obligations under the contracts we enter into with them. Charterers are sensitive to the commodity markets and may be impacted by market forces affecting commodities. In addition, in depressed market conditions, there have been reports of charterers renegotiating their charters or defaulting on their obligations under charters. Our customers may fail to pay charter hire or attempt to renegotiate charter rates. Should a charterer counterparty fail to honor its obligations under agreements with us, it may be difficult to secure substitute employment for that vessel, and any new charter arrangements we secure on the spot market or on substitute charters may be at lower rates depending on the then existing charter rate levels. In addition, if the charterer of a vessel in our fleet that is used as collateral under our loan agreements defaults on its charter obligations to us, such default may constitute an event of default under our loan agreements, which may allow the banks to exercise remedies under our loan agreements. As a result of these risks, we could sustain significant losses, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition.

We may fail to successfully control our operating and voyage expenses.

Our operating results are dependent on our ability to successfully control our operating and voyage expenses. Under our ship management agreements with ITM, our technical manager, we are required to pay for vessel operating expenses (which includes crewing, repairs and maintenance, insurance, stores, lube oils and communication expenses), and, for spot charters, voyage expenses (which include bunker expenses, port fees, cargo loading and unloading expenses, canal tolls, agency fees and conversions). These expenses depend upon a variety of factors, many of which are beyond our or the technical manager’s control, including unexpected increases in costs for crews, insurance or spare parts for its vessels, unexpected drydock repairs, mechanical failures or human error (including revenue lost in off-hire days), arrest action against our vessels due to failure to pay debts, disputes with creditors or claims by third parties, labor strikes, severe weather conditions, any quarantines of our vessels and uncertainties in the world oil markets. Some of these costs, primarily relating to insurance and enhanced security measures, have been increasing and may increase, possibly significantly, in the future. Repair costs are unpredictable and can be substantial, some of which may not be covered by insurance. If our vessels are subject to unexpected or unscheduled off-hire time, it could adversely affect our cash flow and may expose us to claims for liquidated damages if the vessel is chartered at the time of the unscheduled off-hire period. The cost of drydocking repairs, additional off-hire time, an increase in our operating expenses and/or the obligation to pay any liquidated damages could adversely affect our business, results of operations and financial condition. In addition, to the extent our vessels are employed under voyage charters in the future, our expenses may be impacted by increases in bunker costs and by canal costs, including the cost of canal-related delays incurred by employment of its vessels on certain routes. Unlike time charters in which the charterer bears all bunker and canal costs, in spot charters we bear these costs. Because it is not possible to predict the future price of bunkers or canal-related costs when fixing spot charters, a significant rise in these costs could have an adverse impact on the costs associated with any spot charters we enter into and our earnings. Additionally, an increase in the price of bunkers beyond our expectations may adversely affect our profitability at the time we negotiate time or bareboat charters.

We will be required to make substantial capital expenditures, for which we may be dependent on additional financing, to maintain the vessels we own or to acquire other vessels.

We must make substantial capital expenditures to maintain, over the long term, the operating capacity of our fleet. Our business strategy is also based in part upon the expansion of our fleet through the purchase of additional vessels. We currently estimate, based upon current and anticipated market conditions, our capital expenditures of potential acquisitions in the near term could be in excess of $25.0 million. This amount includes the possible acquisition of the Miss Lucy or the Pyxis Loucas, two vessels owned or controlled by affiliates of our chief executive officer. Maintenance capital expenditures include drydocking expenses, modification of existing vessels or acquisitions of new vessels to the extent these expenditures are incurred to maintain the operating capacity of our fleet. In addition, we expect to incur significant maintenance costs for our current and any newly-acquired vessels. A newbuilding vessel must be drydocked within five years of its delivery from a shipyard, and vessels are typically drydocked every 30 to 60 months thereafter depending on the vessel, not including any unexpected repairs. We estimate the cost to drydock a vessel is between $0.3 and $0.8 million, depending on the size and condition of the vessel and the location of drydocking. In addition, capital maintenance expenditures could increase as a result of changes in the cost of labor and materials, customer requirements, increases in the size of our fleet, governmental regulations and maritime self-regulatory organization standards relating to safety, security or the environment and competitive standards. Pending government regulations may also require us to incur $0.65 million or more per MR tanker for ballast water treatment system upgrades during special surveys commencing 2017.

To purchase additional vessels from time to time, we may be required to incur additional borrowings or raise capital through the sale of debt or additional equity securities. Our ability to obtain bank financing or to access the capital markets for future offerings

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may be limited by our financial condition at that time as well as by adverse market conditions resulting from, among other things, general economic conditions and contingencies and uncertainties that are beyond our control.

We cannot assure you that we will be able to obtain such additional financing in the future on terms that are acceptable to us or at all. Our failure to obtain funds for capital expenditures could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition. In addition, our actual operating and maintenance capital expenditures will vary significantly from quarter to quarter based on, among other things, the number of vessels drydocked during that quarter. Even if we are successful in obtaining the necessary funds for capital expenditures, the terms of such financings could limit our ability to pay dividends to our stockholders. Incurring additional debt may significantly increase our interest expense and financial leverage, and issuing additional equity securities may result in significant dilution.

Any vessel modification projects we undertake could have significant cost overruns, delays or fail to achieve the intended results.

Market volatility and higher fuel prices, coupled with increased regulation and concern about the environmental impact of the international shipping industry, have led to an increased focus on fuel efficiency. Many shipbuilders have implemented vessel modification programs for their existing ships in an attempt to capture potential efficiency gains. We will consider making modifications to our fleet where we believe the efficiency gains will result in a positive return for our stockholders. However, these types of projects are subject to risks of delay and cost overruns, resulting from shortages of equipment, unforeseen engineering problems, work stoppages, unanticipated cost increases, inability to obtain necessary certifications and approvals, shortages of materials or skilled labor, among other problems. In addition, any completed modification may not achieve the full expected benefits or could even compromise the fleet’s ability to operate at higher speeds, which is an important factor in generating additional revenue in an improving freight rate environment. The failure to successfully complete any modification project we undertake or any significant cost overruns or delays in any retrofitting projects could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition. 

We may not be able to implement our business strategy successfully or manage our growth effectively.

Our future growth will depend on the successful implementation of our business strategy. A principal focus of our business strategy is to grow by expanding the size of our fleet while capitalizing on a mix of charter types, including on the spot market. Our future growth will depend upon a number of factors, some of which are not within our control. These factors include our ability to identify suitable tankers and/or shipping companies for acquisitions at attractive prices, identify and consummate desirable acquisitions, joint ventures or strategic alliances, hire, train and retain qualified personnel and crew to manage and operate our growing business and fleet, improve our operating, financial and accounting systems and controls and obtain required financing for our existing and new vessels and operations.

Acquisitions of vessels may not be profitable to us at or after the time we acquire them. We may fail to realize anticipated benefits, such as new customer relationships, cost-savings or cash flow enhancements, decrease our liquidity by using a significant portion of our available cash or borrowing capacity to finance vessel acquisitions, significantly increase our interest expense or financial leverage if we incur additional debt to finance vessel acquisitions, fail to integrate any acquired tankers or businesses successfully with our existing operations, accounting systems and infrastructure generally, incur or assume unanticipated liabilities, losses or costs associated with the business or vessels acquired, particularly if any vessel we acquire proves not to be in good condition or incur other significant charges, such as impairment of goodwill or other intangible assets, asset devaluation or restructuring charges. In addition, unlike newbuildings, secondhand vessels typically provide very limited or no warranties with respect to the condition of the vessel. While we expect we would inspect secondhand vessels prior to purchase, this does not provide us with the same knowledge about their condition that we would have had if these vessels had been built for and operated exclusively by us. Generally, we do not receive the benefit of warranties from the builders of the secondhand vessels that we acquire.

We also seek to take advantage of changing market conditions, which may include taking advantage of pooling arrangements or profit sharing components of the charters we may enter into. In addition, our future growth will depend upon our ability to: maintain or develop new and existing customer relationships; employ vessels consistent with our chartering strategy, successfully manage our liquidity and expenses and identify and capitalize on opportunities in new markets. Changing market and regulatory conditions may require or result in the sale or other disposition of vessels we are not able to charter because of customer preferences or because they are not or will not be compliant with existing or future rules, regulations and conventions. Additional vessels of the age and quality we desire may not be available for purchase at prices we are prepared to pay or at delivery times acceptable to us, and we may not be able to dispose of vessels at reasonable prices, if at all.

However, even if we successfully implement our business strategy, we may not improve our net revenues or operating results. Furthermore, we may decide to alter or discontinue aspects of our business strategy and may adopt alternative or additional strategies in response to business or competitive factors or factors or events beyond our control. Our failure to execute our business strategy or to manage our growth effectively could adversely affect our business, results of operations and financial condition.

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New vessels may experience initial operational difficulties and unexpected incremental start-up costs.

New vessels, during their initial period of operation, have the possibility of encountering structural, mechanical and electrical problems as well as unexpected incremental start-up costs. Typically, the purchaser of a newbuilding will receive the benefit of a warranty from the shipyard for newbuildings, but we cannot assure you that any warranty we obtain will be able to resolve any problem with the vessel without additional costs to us and off-hire periods for the vessel. Upon delivery of a new build vessel from a shipyard, we may incur operating expenses above the incremental start-up costs typically associated with such a delivery and such expenses may include, among others, additional crew training, consumables and spares.

Delays in deliveries of vessels on order or additional vessels, our decision to cancel an order for purchase of a vessel or our inability to otherwise complete the acquisitions of additional vessels for our fleet, could harm our operating results.

We expect to purchase additional vessels from time to time. The delivery of these vessels, or vessels on order, could be delayed, not completed or cancelled, which would delay or eliminate our expected receipt of revenues from the employment of these vessels. The seller could fail to deliver these vessels to us as agreed, or we could cancel a purchase contract because the seller has not met its obligations. The delivery of vessels we propose to order or that are on order could be delayed because of, among other things, work stoppages or other labor disturbances or other events that disrupt the operations of the shipyard building the vessels, quality or other engineering problems, changes in governmental regulations or maritime self-regulatory organization standards, lack of raw materials, bankruptcy or other financial crisis of the shipyard building the vessels, our inability to obtain requisite financing or make timely payments, a backlog of orders at the shipyard building the vessels, hostilities or political or economic disturbances in the countries where the vessels are being built, weather interference or catastrophic event, such as a major earthquake, typhoon or fire, our requests for changes to the original vessel specifications, shortages or delays in the receipt of necessary construction materials, such as steel, our inability to obtain requisite permits or approvals, a dispute with the shipyard building the vessels, hostilities or political disturbances, non-performance of the purchase agreement with respect to the vessels by the seller, our inability to obtain requisite permits, approvals or financings or damage to or destruction of vessels while being operated by the seller prior to the delivery date. If the delivery of any vessel is materially delayed or cancelled, especially if we have committed the vessel to a charter under which we become responsible for substantial liquidated damages to the customer as a result of the delay or cancellation, our business, results of operations and financial condition could be adversely affected.

Declines in charter rates and other market deterioration could cause us to incur impairment charges.

We evaluate the carrying amounts of our vessels to determine if events have occurred that would require an impairment of their carrying amounts. The recoverable amount of vessels is reviewed based on events and changes in circumstances that would indicate that the carrying amount of the assets might not be recovered. The review for potential impairment indicators and projection of future cash flows related to the vessels is complex and requires our management to make various estimates including future charter rates, operating expenses and drydock costs. All of these items have been historically volatile.

The failure of our charterers to meet their obligations under our time charter agreements, on which we depend for a majority of our revenues, could cause us to suffer losses or otherwise adversely affect our business.

As of March 10, 2016, five of our vessels in operation were employed under fixed rate time charter agreements. When our existing time charter agreements expire or upon delivery in the future of any vessels we construct or order, we may enter into new time charter agreements for periods of three months or longer. The ability and willingness of each of our counterparties to perform its obligations under a time charter agreement with us will depend on a number of factors that are beyond our control and may include, among other things, general economic conditions, the condition of the tanker shipping industry and the overall financial condition of the counterparties. Charterers are sensitive to the commodity markets and may be impacted by market forces affecting commodities. In addition, in depressed market conditions, there have been reports of charterers renegotiating their charters or defaulting on their obligations under charters. Our customers may fail to pay charter hire or attempt to renegotiate charter rates. Should a counterparty fail to honor its obligations under agreements with us, it may be difficult to secure substitute employment for such vessel, and any new charter arrangements we secure in the spot market or on time charters may be at lower rates. The costs and delays associated with the default by a charterer under a charter of a vessel may be considerable. If our charterers fail to meet their obligations to us or attempt to renegotiate their charter agreements, we could sustain significant losses, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations, financial condition and compliance with covenants in our loan agreements.

Our charterers may terminate charters early or choose not to re-charter with us, which could adversely affect our business, results of operations and financial condition.

Our charters may terminate earlier than the dates indicated in the charter party agreements. The terms of our charters vary as to which events or occurrences will cause a charter to terminate or give the charterer the option to terminate the charter, but these generally include a total or constructive loss of the relevant vessel, the requisition for hire of the relevant vessel, the drydocking of the

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relevant vessel for a certain period of time or the failure of the relevant vessel to meet specified performance criteria. In addition, the ability of each of our charterers to perform its obligations under a charter will depend on a number of factors that are beyond our control. These factors may include general economic conditions, the condition of the tanker industry, the charter rates received for specific types of vessels and various operating expenses. An early termination of our charters may adversely affect our business, results of operations and financial condition.

We cannot predict whether our charterers will, upon the expiration of their charters, re-charter our vessels on favorable terms or at all. If our charterers decide not to re-charter our vessels, we may not be able to re-charter them on terms similar to our current charters or at all. In the future, we may also employ our vessels on the spot-charter market, which is subject to greater rate fluctuation than the time charter market. If we receive lower charter rates under replacement charters or are unable to re-charter all of our vessels, our available cash may be significantly reduced or eliminated.

We are dependent on the services of our founder and chief executive officer and other members of our senior management team.

We are dependent upon our chief executive officer, Mr. Valentis, and the other members of our senior management team for the principal decisions with respect to our business activities. The loss or unavailability of the services of any of these key members of our management team for any significant period of time, or the inability of these individuals to manage or delegate their responsibilities successfully as our business grows, could adversely affect our business, results of operations and financial condition. If the individuals were no longer to be affiliated with us, we may be unable to recruit other employees with equivalent talent and experience, and our business and financial condition may suffer as a result. We currently do not intend to maintain “key man” life insurance for our chief executive or other members of our senior management team.

Our founder, chairman and chief executive officer has affiliations with Maritime, our ship manager, which may create conflicts of interest.

Mr. Valentis, our founder, chairman and chief executive officer, also owns and controls Maritime, our ship manager. His responsibilities and relationships with Maritime could create conflicts of interest between us, on the one hand, and Maritime, on the other hand. These conflicts may arise in connection with the chartering, purchase, sale and operations of the vessels in our fleet versus vessels managed by other companies affiliated with Maritime. Maritime entered into a Head Management Agreement with us. The negotiation of these management arrangements may have resulted in certain terms that may not reflect market standard terms or may include terms that could not have been obtained from arms-length negotiations with unaffiliated third parties for similar services.

In addition, Maritime may give preferential treatment to vessels that are time chartered-in by related parties because our founder, chairman and chief executive officer and members of his family may receive greater economic benefits. In particular, as of December 31, 2015, Maritime provided commercial management services to three tanker vessels, other than the vessels in our fleet, that were owned or operated by entities affiliated with Mr. Valentis, and such entities may acquire additional vessels that will compete with our vessels in the future. Such conflicts may have an adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition.

Several of our senior executive officers do not, and certain of our officers in the future may not, devote all of their time to our business, which may hinder our ability to operate successfully.

Mr. Valentis, Mr. Lytras, our chief operating officer, Mr. Williams, our chief financial officer, and Mr. Backos, our general counsel, senior vice president and secretary, participate, and other of our senior officers which we may appoint in the future may also participate, in business activities not associated with us. As a result, they may devote less time to us than if they were not engaged in other business activities and may owe fiduciary duties to our stockholders as well as stockholders of other companies with which they may be affiliated. This may create conflicts of interest in matters involving or affecting us and our customers and it is not certain that any of these conflicts of interest will be resolved in our favor. This could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition.

Our senior executive officers and directors may not be able to successfully organize and manage a publicly traded company.

None of our senior executive officers or directors have previously organized and managed a publicly traded company, and they may not be successful in doing so. The demands of organizing and managing a publicly traded company such as us are much greater as compared to those of a private company, and some of our senior executive officers and directors may not be able to successfully meet those increased demands.

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As we expand our business, Maritime and we may need to improve our operating and financial systems and Maritime will need to recruit and retain suitable employees and crew for our vessels.

Our and Maritime’s current operating and financial systems may not be adequate as the size of our fleet expands, and attempts to improve those systems may be ineffective. In addition, as we expand our fleet, Maritime may need to recruit and retain suitable additional seafarers and shore based administrative and management personnel. We cannot guarantee that Maritime will be able to continue to hire suitable employees as we expand our fleet. If we or Maritime encounter business or financial difficulties, we may not be able to adequately staff our vessels. If we are unable to accomplish the above as we expands our fleet, our financial reporting performance may be adversely affected and, among other things, it may not be compliant with SEC rules.

Our insurance may be insufficient to cover losses that may result from our operations.

Although we carry hull and machinery, protection and indemnity and war risk insurance on each of the vessels in our fleet, we face several risks regarding that insurance. The insurance is subject to deductibles, limits and exclusions. Since it is possible that a large number of claims may be brought, the aggregate amount of these deductibles could be material. As a result, there may be other risks against which we are not insured, and certain claims may not be paid. We do not carry insurance covering the loss of revenues resulting from vessel off-hire time based on our analysis of the cost of this coverage compared to our off-hire experience.

Certain of our insurance coverage, such as tort liability including pollution-related liability, is maintained through mutual protection and indemnity associations, and as a member of such associations we may be required to make additional payments over and above budgeted premiums if member claims exceed association reserves. These additional payments will be based not only on our claim records but also on the claim records of other members of the protection and indemnity associations through which we receive insurance coverage. We may be unable to procure adequate insurance coverage at commercially reasonable rates in the future. For example, more stringent environmental regulations have led in the past to increased costs for, and in the future may result in the lack of availability of, insurance against risks of environmental damage or pollution. Changes in the insurance markets attributable to terrorist attacks may also make certain types of insurance more difficult for us to obtain. We maintain for each of the vessels in our existing fleet pollution liability coverage insurance in the amount of $1.0 billion per incident. A catastrophic oil spill or marine disaster could exceed such insurance coverage. The circumstances of a spill could also result in a denial of coverage by insurers, protracted litigation and delayed or diminished insurance recoveries. In addition, our insurance may be voidable by the insurers as a result of certain of our actions, such as our vessels failing to maintain certification with applicable maritime self-regulatory organizations. The circumstances of a spill, including non-compliance with environmental laws, could also result in the denial of coverage, protracted litigation and delayed or diminished insurance recoveries or settlements. In addition, the insurance that may be available to us may be significantly more expensive than our existing coverage. Furthermore, even if insurance coverage is adequate we may not be able to obtain a timely replacement vessel in the event of a loss. Any of these circumstances or events could negatively impact our business, results of operations and financial condition.

We and our subsidiaries may be subject to group liability for damages or debts owed by one of our subsidiaries or by us.

Although each of our vessels is and will be separately owned by individual subsidiaries, under certain circumstances, a parent company and its ship-owning subsidiaries can be held liable under corporate veil piercing principles for damages or debts owed by one of the subsidiaries or the parent. Therefore, it is possible that all of our assets and those of our subsidiaries could be subject to execution upon a judgment against us or any of our subsidiaries.

Maritime, our ship manager, ITM, our technical manager for all of our vessels, and North Sea Tankers (“NST”), our commercial manager for the Northsea Alpha and Northsea Beta, are privately held companies and there is little or no publicly available information about them.

The ability of Maritime, ITM and NST to render their respective management services will depend in part on their own financial strength. Circumstances beyond each such company’s control could impair its financial strength. Because each of these companies is privately held, information about each company’s financial strength is not available. As a result, we and an investor in our securities might have little advance warning of financial or other problems affecting either Maritime, ITM or NST even though its financial or other problems could have a material adverse effect on us and our stockholders.

Our vessels may operate in pooling arrangements in the future, which may or may not be beneficial compared to chartering our vessels outside of a pool.

In a pooling arrangement, the net revenues generated by all of the vessels in a pool are aggregated and distributed to pool members pursuant to a pre-arranged weighting system that recognizes each vessel’s earnings capacity based on factors, which may include its cargo capacity, speed and fuel consumption, and actual on-hire performance. Pooling arrangements are intended to maximize vessel utilization. However, pooling arrangements are dependent on the spot charter market, in which rates fluctuate. We

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cannot assure you that entering any of our vessels into a pool will be beneficial to us compared to chartering our vessels outside of a pool. If we participate in, or for any reason our vessels cease to participate in a pooling arrangement, their utilization rates could fall and the amount of additional hire paid could decrease, either of which could have an adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition. We also cannot assure you that if we join a pooling arrangement that we will continue to use the pooling arrangement or whether the pools our vessels could participate in will continue to exist in the future.

Exchange rate fluctuations could adversely affect our revenues, financial condition and operating results.

We generate a substantial part of our revenues in U.S. dollars, but incur costs in other currencies. The difference in currencies could in the future lead to fluctuations in our net income due to changes in the value of the U.S. dollar relative to other currencies. We have not hedged our exposure to exchange rate fluctuations, and as a result, our U.S. dollar denominated results of operations and financial condition could suffer as exchange rates fluctuate.

Risks Related to our Indebtedness

The market values of our vessels may decrease, which could cause, as in the past, us to breach covenants in our loan agreements.

The fair market values of product tankers have generally experienced high volatility. You should expect the market value of our vessels to fluctuate. Values for ships can fluctuate substantially over time due to a number of factors, including prevailing economic conditions in the energy markets, a substantial or extended decline in demand for refined products, competition from other shipping companies and other modes of transportation, the level of worldwide refined petroleum product production and exports, changes in the supply-demand balance of the global product tanker market, applicable governmental regulations, the availability of newbuild and newer, more advanced vessels at attractive prices compared to our vessels, changes in prevailing charter hire rates, the physical condition of the ship, the vessel’s size, age, technical specifications, efficiency and operational flexibility and the cost of retrofitting or modifying existing ships, as a result of technological advances in ship design or equipment, changes in applicable environmental or other regulations or standards, customer requirements or otherwise.

If the market value of our fleet declines, we may not be able to incur debt at all or on terms that are acceptable to us. A decrease in these values could cause us to breach certain covenants that are contained in our loan agreements and in future financing agreements. Prior to the consummation of the merger agreed to in the Agreement and Plan of Merger, which we entered into on April 23, 2015 (the “LookSmart Agreement”), vessel value fluctuations caused us to not comply with the minimum security covenant in Fourthone’s loan agreement with Commerzbank. In connection with our obtaining Commerzbank’s consent to the merger, in October 2015 we provided Commerzbank with a new guarantee (in place of the prior one given by Maritime) and security in the Northern Alpha and Northsea Beta as additional collateral to satisfy such non-compliance.

If we breach covenants in our loan agreements or future financing agreements and are unable to cure the breach, our lenders could accelerate our debt repayment and foreclose on vessels in our fleet. In addition, as vessels grow older, they generally decline in value. If for any reason we sell vessels at a time when prices have fallen, we could incur a loss and our business, results of operations and financial condition could be adversely affected. The market value of our fleet may decline more rapidly than book value as the vessels age, and we will incur losses on disposition if we sell vessels below depreciated book value. Please read “Item 4. Information on the Company – The International Product Tanker Shipping Industry” for information concerning historical prices of product tankers.

Restrictive covenants in our current and future loan agreements may impose financial and other restrictions on us.

The restrictions and covenants in our current and future loan agreements could adversely affect our ability to finance future operations or capital needs or to pursue and expand our business activities. Our current loan agreements contain, and future financing agreements will likely contain, restrictive covenants that may prohibit us or our subsidiaries from, among other things:

 

·

paying dividends under certain circumstances, including if there is a default under the loan agreements or with respect to our subsidiaries, Sixthone and Seventhone, if the ratio of the total liabilities and the market value of our adjusted total assets (total assets adjusted to reflect the market value of all our vessels) and our subsidiaries as a group is greater than 65% in the relevant year;

 

·

incurring or guaranteeing indebtedness;

 

·

charging, pledging or otherwise encumbering our vessels;

 

·

changing the flag, class, management or ownership of our vessels;

 

·

utilizing available cash;

 

·

changing ownership or structure, including through mergers, consolidations, liquidations or dissolutions;

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·

making certain investments;

 

·

entering into a new line of business;

 

·

changing the commercial and technical management of our vessels; and

 

·

selling, transferring, assigning or changing the beneficial ownership or control of our vessels.

In addition, the loan agreements generally contain covenants requiring us, among other things, to ensure that:

 

·

we maintain minimum cash and cash equivalents based on the number of vessels owned and chartered-in and debt service requirements. Our required minimum cash balance as of December 31, 2014 and December 31, 2015 was $1.1 million and $4.6 million, respectively, and our required minimum cash balance will increase to $5.0 million as of June 30, 2016;

 

·

our subsidiaries, Sixthone and Seventhone, maintain retention accounts with monthly deposits equal to one-third of the next quarterly principal installment together with the appropriate amount of interest expense due;

 

·

the fair market value of the mortgaged vessel plus any additional collateral must be no less than a certain percentage (ranging from 125% to 133%) of outstanding borrowings under the applicable loan agreement, less any money in respect of the principal outstanding with the credit of any applicable retention account and any free or pledged cash deposits held with the lender in our or its subsidiary’s name; and

 

·

we maintain, depending on the loan agreement, a total liabilities to total asset ratio (as adjusted for market values) of no greater than 75%.

As a result of the above, we may need to seek permission from our lenders in order to engage in some corporate actions. The lenders’ interests may be different from ours and we may not be able to obtain our lenders’ permission when needed. This may limit our ability to pay dividends to you if we determine to do so in the future, finance our future operations or capital requirements, make acquisitions or pursue business opportunities.

Our ability to comply with covenants and restrictions contained in our current and future loan agreements may also be affected by events beyond our control, including prevailing economic, financial and industry conditions. If our cash flow is insufficient to service our current and future indebtedness and to meet our other obligations and commitments, we will be required to adopt one or more alternatives, such as reducing or delaying our business activities, acquisitions, investments, capital expenditures, the payment of dividends or the implementation of our other strategies, refinancing or restructuring our debt obligations, selling vessels or other assets, seeking to raise additional debt or equity capital or seeking bankruptcy protection. However, we may not be able to effect any of these remedies or alternatives on a timely basis, on satisfactory terms or at all, which could lead to events of default under these loan agreements, giving the lenders foreclosure rights on our vessels.

Our ability to obtain additional debt financing may be dependent on the performance of our then existing charters and the creditworthiness of our charterers.

The actual or perceived credit quality of our charterers, and any defaults by them, may materially affect our ability to obtain the additional capital resources that we will require to purchase additional vessels or may significantly increase our costs of obtaining such capital. Our inability to obtain additional financing at all, or our ability to do so only at a higher than anticipated cost, may materially affect our results of operations and our ability to implement our business strategy.

Servicing debt, including debt which we may incur in the future, will limit funds available for other purposes and if we cannot service our debt, we may lose our vessels.

Borrowings under our existing and future loan agreements require, and will require, us to dedicate a part of our cash flow from operations to paying principal and interest on our indebtedness. These payments limit funds available for working capital, capital expenditures and other purposes. Amounts borrowed under our loan agreements bear interest at variable rates. Increases in prevailing interest rates could increase the amounts that we would have to pay to our lenders, even though the outstanding principal amount remains the same, and our net income and cash flows would decrease. If we do not generate or reserve enough cash flow from operations to satisfy our debt obligations, we may have to: seek to raise additional capital; refinance or restructure our debt; sell vessels; or reduce or delay capital investments. However, these alternatives, if necessary, may not be sufficient to allow us to meet our debt obligations. If we are unable to meet our debt obligations or if some other default occurs under our loan agreements, the lenders could elect to declare that debt, together with accrued interest and fees, to be immediately due and payable and foreclose against the collateral vessels securing that debt.

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Risks Related to Being a Public, Emerging Growth Company

Our costs of operating as a public company will increase and will be significant, and our management will be required to devote substantial time to complying with public company regulations.

As a public company, we have begun to incur, and expect to incur additional, significant legal, accounting and other expenses, including costs associated with our public company reporting requirements under the Exchange Act. We must also follow the rules, regulations and requirements subsequently adopted by the SEC, including Sarbanes-Oxley, and the rules of Nasdaq. Although we cannot precisely predict the final yearly amount, we believe that such additional expenses would be in excess of approximately $0.5 million per year, which includes accounting and legal fees, costs for remuneration of our board of directors and our committees and director and officer liability insurance. In addition, our senior executive officers, none of whom has experience managing U.S. public companies, and other personnel will also need to devote a substantial amount of time and financial resources to complying with these rules, regulations and requirements. Our management may initially require additional services from accounting, legal and other professional advisors. As a result, these efforts may divert management’s attention from implementing our business strategy.

We are an “emerging growth company,” and we cannot be certain if the reduced disclosure requirements applicable to emerging growth companies will make our securities less attractive to investors.

We are an “emerging growth company,” as defined in the JOBS Act. We will remain an “emerging growth company” for up to five years. As an emerging growth company, we are not required to comply with the auditor attestation requirements of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act, we have reduced disclosure obligations regarding executive compensation in our periodic reports, and we are exempt from the requirements of holding a nonbinding advisory vote on executive compensation and stockholder approval of any golden parachute payments not previously approved. Further, the JOBS Act exempts emerging growth companies from being required to comply with new or revised financial accounting standards until private companies are required to comply with the new or revised financial accounting standards. The JOBS Act provides that a company can elect to opt out of the extended transition period and comply with the requirements that apply to non-emerging growth companies but any such an election to opt out is irrevocable. We have elected not to opt out of such extended transition period, which means that when a standard is issued or revised and it has different application dates for public or private companies, we, as an emerging growth company, will not adopt the new or revised standard until the time private companies are required to adopt the new or revised standard. This may make comparison of our financial statements with other public companies difficult or impossible because of the potential differences in accountant standards used. We cannot predict if investors will find our common stock less attractive because we may rely on these provisions. If some investors find our common stock less attractive as a result, there may be a less active trading market for our shares and our share price may be more volatile.

If we fail to maintain an effective system of internal control over financial reporting, we may not be able to accurately report our financial results or prevent fraud. As a result, stockholders could lose confidence in our financial and other public reporting, which would harm our business and the trading price of our common stock.

Effective internal controls over financial reporting are necessary for us to provide reliable financial reports and, together with adequate disclosure controls and procedures, are designed to prevent fraud. Any failure to implement required new or improved controls, or difficulties encountered in our implementation, could cause us to fail to meet our reporting obligations. Any testing by us conducted in connection with Section 404 of Sarbanes-Oxley, or any subsequent testing by our independent registered public accounting firm, may reveal deficiencies in our internal controls over financial reporting that may require prospective or retroactive changes in our financial statements or identify other areas for further attention or improvement. In addition, for as long as we are an “emerging growth company,” our independent registered public accounting firm will not be required to attest to the effectiveness of our internal controls over financial reporting pursuant to Section 404 of Sarbanes-Oxley. An independent assessment of the effectiveness of our internal controls could detect problems that our management’s assessment might not. Undetected material weaknesses in our internal controls could lead to restatements of our financial statements and require us to incur the expense of remediation. Inferior internal controls could also cause investors to lose confidence in our reported financial information, which could have a negative effect on the trading price of our common stock.

The Public Company Accounting Oversight Board inspection of our independent accounting firm could lead to findings in our auditors’ reports and challenge the accuracy of our published audited consolidated financial statements.

Auditors of U.S. public companies are required by law to undergo periodic Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (“PCAOB”) inspections that assess their compliance with U.S. law and professional standards in connection with performance of audits of financial statements filed with the SEC. For several years certain European Union countries, including Greece, did not permit the PCAOB to conduct inspections of accounting firms established and operating in such European Union countries, even if they were part of major international firms. Accordingly and unlike for most U.S. public companies and their stockholders, the PCAOB was prevented from evaluating our auditor’s performance of audits and its quality control procedures, and we and our stockholders were deprived of the possible benefits of such inspections. During 2015, Greece has agreed to allow the PCAOB to conduct inspections of accounting firms operating in Greece. In the future, such PCAOB inspections could result in findings in our auditors’ quality control

20


procedures, question the validity of the auditor’s reports on our published consolidated financial statements and the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting, and cast doubt upon the accuracy of our published audited financial statements.

Risks Related to our Common Stock

An investment in our common stock is speculative and there can be no assurance of any return on any such investment.

An investment in our common stock is highly speculative, and there is no assurance that investors will obtain any return on their investment. Investors will be subject to substantial risks involved in their investment, including the risk of losing their entire investment.

We may issue additional shares of our common stock or other equity securities without stockholder approval, which would dilute your ownership interests and may depress the market price of our common stock.

We may issue additional shares of our common stock or other equity securities of equal or senior rank in the future in connection with, among other things, future vessel acquisitions, repayment of outstanding indebtedness or our equity incentive plan, without stockholder approval, in a number of circumstances. Our issuance of additional common stock or other equity securities of equal or senior rank would have the following effects:

 

·

our existing stockholders’ proportionate ownership interest in us will decrease;

 

·

the amount of cash available per share, including for payment of dividends in the future, may decrease;

 

·

the relative voting strength of each previously outstanding share of our common stock may be diminished; and

 

·

the market price of our common stock may decline.

Future sales of shares of our common stock by existing shareholders or issuance of shares of our common stock pursuant to the exercise by Legacy LookSmart Stockholders of their make-whole right could negatively impact our ability to sell equity in the future and cause the market price of shares of our common stock to decline.

The market price for shares of our common stock could decline as a result of sales by existing stockholders of large numbers of shares of our common stock, or as a result of the perception that such sales may occur. In addition, according to the make-whole right in our LookSmart Agreement, the Legacy LookSmart Stockholders may elect to receive the value of any difference between $4.30 and the price of our shares in a future offering of at least $5.0 million completed prior to April 29, 2018 in additional shares of our common stock.  Please read “Item 4. Information on the Company – The LookSmart Agreement and Make-Whole Right” for information concerning the make-whole right.  The ability of Legacy LookSmart Stockholders to obtain additional shares of our common stock and any future sales of shares of our common stock by these and other stockholders also might make it more difficult for us to sell equity or equity-related securities in the future at a time and at the prices that we deem appropriate.

We are incorporated in the Marshall Islands, which does not have a well-developed body of corporate or bankruptcy law and, as a result, stockholders may have fewer rights and protections under Marshall Islands law than under a U.S. jurisdiction.

Our corporate affairs are governed by our Articles of Incorporation and Bylaws and by the Marshall Islands Business Corporations Act (the “BCA”). The provisions of the BCA resemble provisions of the corporation laws of a number of states in the United States. However, there have been few judicial cases in the Republic of the Marshall Islands interpreting the BCA. The rights and fiduciary responsibilities of directors under the law of the Republic of the Marshall Islands are not as clearly established as the rights and fiduciary responsibilities of directors under statutes or judicial precedent in existence in certain U.S. jurisdictions. Stockholder rights may differ as well. While the BCA does specifically incorporate the non-statutory law, or judicial case law, of the State of Delaware and other states with substantially similar legislative provisions, our public stockholders may have more difficulty in protecting their interests in the face of actions by management, directors or significant stockholders than would stockholders of a corporation incorporated in a U.S. jurisdiction. Additionally, the Republic of the Marshall Islands does not have a legal provision for bankruptcy or a general statutory mechanism for insolvency proceedings. As such, in the event of a future insolvency or bankruptcy, our stockholders and creditors may experience delays in their ability to recover their claims after any such insolvency or bankruptcy.

It may be difficult to serve process on or enforce a U.S. judgment against us, our officers and our directors because we are a foreign corporation.

We are a corporation formed in the Marshall Islands, a substantial portion of our assets are located outside of the United States and many of our directors and executive officers are not residents of the United States. As a result, you may have difficulty serving legal process within the United States upon us. You may also have difficulty enforcing, both in and outside the United States, judgments you may obtain in U.S. courts against us in any action, including actions based upon the civil liability provisions of U.S.

21


federal or state securities laws. Furthermore, there is substantial doubt that the courts of the Marshall Islands or of the non-U.S. jurisdictions in which our offices are located would enter judgments in original actions brought in those courts predicated on U.S. federal or state securities laws. As a result, it may be difficult or impossible for you to bring an original action against us or against individuals in a Marshall Islands court in the event that you believe that your rights have been infringed under the U.S. federal securities laws or otherwise because the Marshall Islands courts would not have subject matter jurisdiction to entertain such a suit. A judgment entered in a foreign jurisdiction is enforceable in the Marshall Islands without a retrial on the merits so long as the provisions of the Marshall Islands Uniform Foreign Money-Judgments Recognition Act are complied with. In addition, there is doubt as to the enforceability in Greece against us and/or our executive officers and directors who are non-residents of the U.S., in original actions or in actions for enforcement of judgments of U.S. courts, of liabilities predicated solely upon the securities laws of the U.S.

We do not intend to pay dividends in the near future and cannot assure you that we will pay dividends.

We do not intend to pay dividends in the near future and will make dividend payments to our stockholders in the future only if our board of directors, acting in its sole discretion, determines that such payments would be in our best interest and in compliance with relevant legal, fiduciary and contractual requirements. The payment of any dividends is not guaranteed or assured, and if paid at all in the future, may be discontinued at any time at the discretion of the board of directors.

Our ability to pay dividends will in any event be subject to factors beyond our control, including the following:

 

·

our earnings, financial condition and anticipated cash requirements;

 

·

the terms of any current or future credit facilities or loan agreements;

 

·

the loss of a vessel or the acquisition of one or more vessels;

 

·

required capital expenditures;

 

·

increased or unanticipated expenses;

 

·

future issuances of securities;

 

·

disputes or legal actions; and

 

·

the requirements of the laws of the Marshall Islands, which limit payments of dividends if we are, or could become, insolvent and generally prohibit the payment of dividends other than from surplus (retaining earnings and the excess of consideration received for the sale of shares above the par value of the shares).

The payment of dividends would not be permitted if we are not in compliance with our loan agreements or in default of such agreements.

We are a holding company, and we depend on the ability of our subsidiaries to distribute funds to us in order to satisfy our financial and other obligations.

We are a holding company and have no significant assets other than the equity interests in our subsidiaries. Our subsidiaries own all of our existing vessels, and subsidiaries we form in the future will own any other vessels we may acquire in the future. All payments under our charters will be made to our subsidiaries. As a result, our ability to pay dividends and meet our other obligations will depend on the performance of our subsidiaries and their ability to distribute funds to us. The ability of a subsidiary to make these distributions could be affected by a claim or other action by a third party, including a creditor, by the terms of our loan agreements, any financing agreement we may enter into in the future, or by Marshall Islands law, which regulates the payment of dividends by companies. The applicable loan agreement entered into by our subsidiaries, Sixthone and Seventhone, prohibit such subsidiaries from paying any dividends to us unless the ratio of the total liabilities and the market value adjusted total assets (total assets adjusted to reflect the market value of all our vessels) of us and our subsidiaries as a group is 65% or less. If we, Sixthone or Seventhone do not satisfy this requirement or if we or a subsidiary breach a covenant in our loan agreements or any financing agreement we may enter into in the future, such subsidiary may be restricted from paying dividends. If we are unable to obtain funds from our subsidiaries, we will not be able to pay dividends unless we obtain funds from other sources, which we may not be able to do.

Maritime Investors Inc. (“Maritime Investors”) beneficially owns approximately 93% of our total outstanding common stock, which may limit stockholders’ ability to influence our actions.

Maritime Investors, a corporation controlled by our chief executive officer, Mr. Valentis, beneficially owns approximately 93% of our outstanding common stock and has the power to exert considerable influence over our actions through Maritime Investors’ ability to effectively control matters requiring stockholder approval, including the determination to enter into a corporate transaction or to prevent a transaction, regardless of whether our stockholders believe that any such transaction is in their or our best interests. For

22


example, Maritime Investors could cause us to consummate a merger or acquisition that increases the amount of our indebtedness or causes us to sell all of our revenue-generating assets. We cannot assure you that the interests of Maritime Investors will coincide with the interests of other stockholders. As a result, the market price of shares of our common stock could be adversely affected.

Additionally, Maritime Investors may invest in entities that directly or indirectly compete with us, or companies in which Maritime Investors currently invests may begin competing with us. Maritime Investors may also separately pursue acquisition opportunities that may be complementary to our business, and as a result, those acquisition opportunities may not be available to us. As a result of these relationships, when conflicts arise between the interests of Maritime Investors and the interests of our other stockholders, Mr. Valentis may not be a disinterested director. Maritime Investors will effectively control all of our corporate decisions so long as they continue to own a substantial number of shares of our common stock.

As a foreign private issuer our corporate governance practices are exempt from certain Nasdaq corporate governance requirements applicable to U.S. domestic companies. As a result, our corporate governance practices may not have the same protections afforded to stockholders of companies that are subject to all of the Nasdaq corporate governance requirements.

We believe that our corporate governance practices are in compliance with the applicable Nasdaq listing rules, and are not prohibited by, the laws of the Republic of the Marshall Islands. For a list of the corporate governance practices followed by us in lieu of the corporate governance rules applicable to U.S. domestic companies, see “Item 16G – Corporate Governance” below.

Anti-takeover provisions in our Articles of Incorporation and Bylaws could make it difficult for our stockholders to replace our board of directors or could have the effect of discouraging an acquisition, which could adversely affect the market price of our common stock.

Several provisions of our Articles of Incorporation and Bylaws could make it difficult for our stockholders to change the composition of our board of directors in any one year. In addition, the same provisions may discourage, delay or prevent a merger or acquisition that stockholders may consider favorable. These provisions include:

 

·

providing for a classified board of directors with staggered, three year terms;

 

·

authorizing the board of directors to issue so-called “blank check” preferred stock without stockholder approval;

 

·

prohibiting cumulative voting in the election of directors;

 

·

authorizing the removal of directors only for cause and only upon the affirmative vote of the holders of two-thirds of the outstanding shares of our common stock cast at an annual meeting of stockholders;

 

·

prohibiting stockholder action by written consent unless consent is signed by all stockholders entitled to vote on the action;

 

·

limiting the persons who may call special meetings of stockholders;

 

·

establishing advance notice requirements for nominations for election to our board of directors or for proposing matters that can be acted on by stockholders at stockholder meetings; and

 

·

restrict business combinations with interested shareholders.

These anti-takeover provisions could substantially impede the ability of public stockholders to benefit from a change in control and, as a result, may adversely affect the market price of our common stock and your ability to realize any potential change of control premium.

We may have to pay tax on U.S. source income, which would reduce our earnings and cash flow.

Under the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended (the “Code”), 50% of the gross shipping income of a vessel owning or chartering corporation (or “shipping income”) that is attributable to voyages that either begin or end in the United States is characterized as “U.S.-source shipping income” and such income is generally subject to a 4% U.S. federal income tax (on a gross basis) unless that corporation qualifies for exemption from tax under Section 883 of the Code or under an applicable U.S. income tax treaty.

As we and our shipowning subsidiaries are organized under the laws of the Republic of the Marshall Islands, a country with which the United States does not have an income tax treaty, we do not qualify for a treaty-based exemption. However, we believe that we qualify for the exemption from tax under Section 883 of the Code for the 2015 taxable year and intend to take such position on our returns for the 2015 taxable year. Nevertheless, for the 2016 or any later taxable year, there are factual circumstances beyond our control that could cause us to lose the benefit of this tax exemption and thereby cause us to become subject to U.S. federal income tax

23


on our U.S.-source shipping income.  For example, there is a risk that we could no longer qualify for exemption under Section 883 of the Code for a particular taxable year if additional shares of our common stock are issued to new shareholders such that, due to their status or unwillingness to cooperate with certain substantiation and reporting requirements, we no longer satisfy one of the ownership test requirements for qualification.  Due to the factual nature of the issues involved, we can give no assurances on the availability of the exemption to us.

If we and/or one or more of our subsidiaries are not entitled to this exemption under Section 883 of the Code for any taxable year, we and/or such subsidiaries would generally be subject for that year to a 4% U.S. federal income tax on the U.S.-source shipping income for that year. The imposition of this tax could have a negative effect on our business and would result in decreased earnings and cash flow.  See “Item 10. Additional Information – E. Taxation – U.S. Federal Income Taxation of Pyxis” for a detailed discussion of the qualification for the exemption under Section 883 of the Code.    

If U.S. tax authorities were to treat us or one or more of our subsidiaries as a “passive foreign investment company,” there could be adverse tax consequences to U.S. holders.

A foreign corporation will be treated as a “passive foreign investment company” (or a “PFIC”) for U.S. federal income tax purposes if either (i) at least 75% of its gross income for any taxable year consists of certain types of “passive income,” or (ii) at least 50% of the average value of the corporation’s assets produce, or are held for the production of, such types of “passive income.” For purposes of these tests, “passive income” includes dividends, interest and gains from the sale or exchange of investment property and rents and royalties other than rents and royalties which are received from unrelated parties in connection with the active conduct of trade or business. For purposes of these tests, time and voyage charter income is generally viewed as income derived from the performance of services and not rental income and, therefore, would not constitute “passive income.”  U.S. shareholders of a PFIC are subject to a disadvantageous U.S. federal income tax regime with respect to the income derived by the PFIC, the distributions they receive from the PFIC and the gain, if any, they derive from the sale or other disposition of their shares in the PFIC.

Based on our current and projected operations, we do not believe that we (or any of our subsidiaries) was a PFIC in its 2015 taxable year, nor do we expect us (or any of our subsidiaries) to become a PFIC with respect to the 2016 or any later taxable year.  In this regard, we intend to treat the gross income we derive or are deemed to derive from our time chartering activities as services income, rather than rental income. Accordingly, we believe that our income from our time chartering activities does not constitute “passive income,” and the assets that we own and operate in connection with the production of that income do not constitute passive assets. There is, however, no direct legal authority under the PFIC rules addressing our method of operation. Accordingly, no assurance can be given that the United States Internal Revenue Service, or IRS, or a court of law will accept our position, and there is a risk that the IRS or a court of law could determine that we are a PFIC.  Moreover, no assurance can be given that we would not constitute a PFIC for any taxable year if there were to be changes in the nature and extent of our operations.

 

If we were treated as a PFIC for any taxable year, our U.S. shareholders may face adverse U.S. federal income tax consequences and information reporting obligations. Under the PFIC rules, unless those shareholders made an election available under the Code (which election could itself have adverse consequences for such shareholders), such shareholders would be liable to pay U.S. federal income tax upon excess distributions and upon any gain from the disposition of shares of our common stock at the then prevailing income tax rates applicable to ordinary income plus interest as if the excess distribution or gain had been recognized ratably over the shareholder’s holding period of our shares. See “Item 10. Additional Information – E. Taxation – U.S. Federal Income Tax Considerations – U.S. Federal Income Taxation of U.S. Holders – Passive Foreign Investment Company Status and Significant Tax Consequences” for a more detailed discussion of the U.S. federal income tax consequences to U.S. holders of our shares of common stock if we are or were to be treated as a PFIC.

 

 

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ITEM 4.

INFORMATION ON THE COMPANY

A.

History and Development of the Company

Our legal and commercial name is Pyxis Tankers Inc.  We are a holding company incorporated under the laws of the Marshall Islands BCA on March 23, 2015 and maintain our principal place of business at the offices of our ship manager, Pyxis Maritime Corp., at 59 K. Karamanli, Maroussi 15125, Athens, Greece. Our telephone number at that address is +30 210 638 0200.  Our registered agent in the Marshall Islands is The Trust Company of the Marshall Islands, Inc. located at Trust Company Complex, Ajeltake Road, Ajeltake Island, Majuro, Marshall Islands MH96960.

We own the vessels in our fleet through six separate wholly-owned subsidiaries that were incorporated in the Marshall Islands. We acquired the vessel-owning subsidiaries from affiliates of our founder and chief executive officer in advance of the closing of the transactions contemplated by the LookSmart Agreement.  In accordance with the terms of the LookSmart Agreement, LookSmart, Ltd. (“LookSmart”), a company then listed on the NASDAQ Capital Market, completed its merger with and into our wholly owned subsidiary, Maritime Technologies Corp. on October 28, 2015. As a condition precedent to the consummation of the merger, LookSmart transferred all of its business, assets and liabilities to its wholly owned subsidiary, LookSmart Group, Inc., and then spun off the ownership of this subsidiary to the LookSmart stockholders. In connection with and prior to the closing of the merger, LookSmart consummated a 1 to .1512 reverse split, thereby reducing the number of its shares outstanding from 5,768,851 to 872,036. Each post-split share of LookSmart was cancelled and exchanged for the right to receive 1.0667 shares of our common stock. Following the merger, we had a total of 18,244,671 shares of common stock issued and outstanding, after giving effect to rounding up on fractional shares.

In September 2013, we took delivery of the new build Pyxis Theta for a total cost of $38.2 million. In April 2014, as part of the fifth year special survey dry docking of the Pyxis Malou, we completed a $0.2 million upgrade program to enhance the vessel’s fuel efficiency and reduce environmental emissions. In January 2015, we took delivery of the new build Pyxis Epsilon for a total cost of $32.5 million. In May and June 2015, the fifth year special survey drydockings for the Northsea Alpha and the Northsea Beta were completed for a cost of $0.4 million for each vessel.

Implications of Being an Emerging Growth Company

As a company with less than US$1.0 billion in revenues for the last fiscal year, we qualify as an “emerging growth company” pursuant to the Jumpstart Our Business Startups Act of 2012 (the “JOBS Act”). An emerging growth company may take advantage of specified reduced reporting and other requirements that are otherwise applicable generally to public companies. These provisions include exemption from the auditor attestation requirement under Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 (“Section 404”), in the assessment of the emerging growth company’s internal control over financial reporting. The JOBS Act also provides that an emerging growth company does not need to comply with any new or revised financial accounting standards until such date that a private company is otherwise required to comply with such new or revised accounting standards. Furthermore, we are not required to present selected financial information or any management’s discussion herein for any period prior to the earliest audited period presented in connection with this Annual Report.

We will remain an emerging growth company until the earliest of (a) the last day of the fiscal year during which we have total annual gross revenues of at least $1.0 billion; (b) the last day of our fiscal year following the fifth anniversary of the completion of the merger; (c) the date on which we have, during the previous three-year period, issued more than US$1.0 billion in non-convertible debt; or (d) the date on which we are deemed to be a “large accelerated filer” under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the “Exchange Act”), which would occur if the market value of our common stock that are held by non-affiliates exceeds $700 million as of the last business day of our most recently completed second fiscal quarter. Once we cease to be an emerging growth company, we will not be entitled to the exemptions provided in the JOBS Act discussed above.

B.

Business Overview

Overview

We are an international maritime transportation company focused on the product tanker sector. Our fleet is comprised of six double hull product tankers, which are employed under a mix of short- and medium-term time charters and spot charters. We acquired these six vessels prior to the merger from affiliates of our founder and chief executive officer, Mr. Valentios (“Eddie”) Valentis. Four of the vessels in the fleet are MR tankers, three of which have eco-efficient or eco-modified designs, and two are short-range tanker sister ships. Each of the vessels in the fleet has IMO certifications and is capable of transporting refined petroleum products, such as naphtha, gasoline, jet fuel, kerosene, diesel and fuel oil, as well as other liquid bulk items, such as vegetable oils and organic chemicals.

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Our principal objective is to own and operate our fleet in a manner that will enable us to benefit from short- and long-term trends that we expect in the product tanker sector to maximize our revenues. We intend to expand the fleet through selective acquisitions of modern product tankers, primarily MRs. We expect to employ our vessels primarily through time charters to creditworthy customers and on the spot market. We intend to continually evaluate the markets in which we operate and, based upon our view of market conditions, adjust our mix of vessel employment by counterparty and stagger our charter expirations. In addition, we may choose to opportunistically direct asset sales when conditions are appropriate, and may pursue a sale or long-term strategy for our small tankers.

The Fleet

The following chart provides summary information concerning our fleet as of March 10, 2016:

 

 

 

 

 

Carrying

 

 

 

 

 

 

Anticipated

 

Charter

 

 

 

 

 

Capacity

 

 

Year

 

Type of

 

Redelivery

 

Rate

 

Vessel Name

 

Shipyard

 

(dwt)

 

 

Built

 

Charter

 

Date(1)

 

(per day) (2)

 

Pyxis Epsilon

 

SPP / S. Korea

 

 

50,295

 

 

2015

 

Time

 

Jan. 2017

 

$

16,575

 

Pyxis Theta

 

SPP / S. Korea

 

 

51,795

 

 

2013

 

Time

 

Sep. 2016

 

$

15,600

 

Pyxis Malou

 

SPP / S. Korea

 

 

50,667

 

 

2009

 

Time

 

Jun. 2016

 

$

18,200

 

Pyxis Delta

 

Hyundai / S. Korea

 

 

46,616

 

 

2006

 

Time

 

Sep. 2016

 

$

18,000

 

Northsea Alpha

 

Kejin / China

 

 

8,615

 

 

2010

 

Time

 

Oct. 2016

 

$

9,650

 

Northsea Beta

 

Kejin / China

 

 

8,647

 

 

2010

 

Spot

 

n/a

 

n/a

 

 

 

 

 

 

216,635

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(1)

Each time charter contains a provision that allows for redelivery plus or minus 30 days, except the Pyxis Delta which allows 15 days. The Pyxis Epsilon’s charterer has an option to extend the charter for one year for $18,050/day. The Pyxis Theta’s charterer has an option to extend the charter for one year for $16,600/day and for an additional year for $17,600/day.

(2)

This table shows gross rates and does not reflect any commissions payable.

Our Charters

We generate revenues by charging customers a fee, typically called charterhire, for the use of our vessels. Customers utilize the vessels to transport their refined petroleum products and other liquid bulk items and have historically entered into the following types of contractual arrangements with us or our affiliates:

 

·

Time charters: A time charter is a contract for the use of a vessel for a fixed period of time at a specified daily rate. Under a time charter, the vessel owner provides crewing and other services related to the vessel’s operation, the cost of which is included in the daily rate. The customer, also called a charterer, is responsible for substantially all of the vessel’s voyage expenses, which are costs related to a particular voyage including the cost for fuel, which is also called bunkers, and any port fees, cargo loading and unloading expenses, canal tolls and agency fees.

 

·

Spot charters: A spot charter is a contract to carry a specific cargo for a single voyage. Spot charters for voyages involve the carriage of a specific amount and type of cargo on a load-port to discharge-port basis, subject to various cargo handling terms, and the vessel owner is paid on a per-ton basis. Under a spot voyage charter, the vessel owner is responsible for the payment of all expenses including voyage expenses, such as port, canal and bunker costs.

The table below sets forth the basic distinctions between these types of charters:

 

 

 

Time Charter

 

Spot Charters

Typical contract length

 

3 months - 5 years or more

 

Indefinite but typically less than 3 months

Basis on which charter rate is paid

 

Per day

 

Per ton, typically

Voyage expenses

 

Charterer pays

 

Pyxis pays

Vessel operating costs(1)

 

Pyxis pays

 

Pyxis pays

Off-hire (2)

 

Pyxis pays

 

Pyxis pays

 

(1)

We are responsible for vessel operating costs, which include crewing, repairs and maintenance, insurance, stores, lube oils, communication expenses and the commercial and technical management fees payable to our ship managers. The largest components of our vessel operating costs are generally crews and repairs and maintenance.

(2)

“Off-hire” refers to the time a vessel is not available for service due primarily to scheduled and unscheduled repairs or drydocking.

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Under both time and spot charters on the vessels in the fleet, we are responsible for the technical management of the vessel and for maintaining the vessel, periodic drydocking, cleaning and painting and performing work required by regulations. We have entered into a contract with Maritime to provide commercial, sale and purchase, and other operations and maintenance services to all of the vessels in our fleet, except for the chartering of the Northsea Alpha and the Northsea Beta, which is performed by NST, a third party manager. Our vessel owning subsidiaries have contracted with ITM, a third party technical manager and subsidiary of V. Ships Limited, to provide crewing and technical management to all of the vessels in our fleet.  See “–Management of Ship Operations, Administration and Safety” below.

We intend to continue to outsource the chartering of the Northsea Alpha to NST, and the day-to-day crewing and technical management of all our vessels to ITM. We believe that ITM has a strong reputation for providing high quality technical vessel services, including expertise in efficiently managing tankers.  On March 16, 2016, we delivered to NST notice of termination with respect to the Northsea Beta, pursuant to which we expect that Thirdone Corp.’s ship management agreement with NST will terminate in June 2016.

In the future, we may also place one or more of our vessels in pooling arrangements or on bareboat charters:

 

·

Pooling Arrangements. In pooling arrangements, vessels are managed by a single pool manager who markets a number of vessels as a single, cohesive fleet and collects, or pools, their net earnings prior to distributing them to the individual owners, typically under a pre-arranged weighting system that recognizes a vessel’s earnings capacity based on various factors. The vessel owner also generally pays commissions on pooling arrangements generally ranging from 1.25% to 5.0% of the earnings.

 

·

Bareboat Charters. A bareboat charter is a contract pursuant to which the vessel owner provides the vessel to the charterer for a fixed period of time at a specified daily rate, and the charterer generally provides for all of the vessel’s operating expenses in addition to the voyage costs and assumes all risk of operation. A bareboat charterer will generally be responsible for operating and maintaining the vessel and will bear all costs and expenses with respect to the vessel, including drydockings and insurance.

Our Competitive Strengths

We believe that we possess a number of competitive strengths relative to other product tanker companies, including:

 

·

High Quality Fleet of Modern Tankers.  As of December 31, 2015, our fleet had an average age of 4.8 years, based on dead weight tonnage, compared to an industry average of approximately 9 years. Our fleet of vessels consists mainly of MR tankers that were built in Korean shipyards. We believe these vessels, along with our smaller tankers, provide our customers with high quality and reliable transportation of cargos at competitive operating costs. Owning a modern fleet reduces off-hire time, repairs and maintenance costs, including dry-docking expenses, and improves safety and environmental performance. Our operating focus has led to high fleet utilization, which has been 96.3% since January, 1, 2013.  Also, lenders are attracted to modern, well maintained vessels, which can result in more reasonable terms for secured loans.

 

·

Established Relationships with Charterers. We have developed long-standing relationships with a number of leading tanker charterers, including major integrated oil companies, refiners, international trading firms and large vessel operators, which we believe will benefit us in the future as we continue to grow our business. Our customers have included, among others, Shell, Cargill, Koch, Trafigura, Total and Vitol.  We strive to meet high standards of operating performance, achieve cost-efficient operations, reliability and safety in all of our operations and maintain long-term relationships with our customers. We believe that our charterers value our fleet of modern, quality tankers as well as our management team’s industry experience. These attributes should allow us to continue to charter our vessels and expand our fleet.

 

·

Competitive Cost Structure. Even though we currently operate a relatively small number of vessels, we believe we are very cost competitive as compared to other companies in our industry. For example, during the year ended December 31, 2015, our daily operating costs per vessel were $6,058 while our general and administrative expenses were $814 per vessel, per ownership day. This is a result of our fleet profile, our experienced technical and commercial managers as well as the hands-on approach of our management team. Our technical manager, ITM, manages 35 tankers, including our vessels. Our technical and commercial management fees aggregate $750/day/vessel, which is competitive within our industry.  Our collaborative approach between our management team and our external managers creates a platform that we believe is able to deliver excellent operational results at competitive costs and positions us for further growth.

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·

Well-Positioned to Capitalize on Improving Rates. We believe our current fleet is positioned to capitalize when spot charter rates improve. As of March 10, 2016, we had five tankers under time charter and one under spot voyages. Our MRs have an average contract duration of seven months, exclusive of the exercise option to extend the charters. As of March 10, 2016, 61% of our fleet’s available days in 2016 were contracted, exclusive of charterers’ options, which provide us visable cash flows. For any additional tankers we acquire, we expect to continue to employ our mixed chartering strategy.

 

·

Experienced Management Team. Our four senior officers, led by our Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Valentios Valentis, have combined over 70 years of industry experience in shipping, including vessel ownership, acquisitions, divestitures, new buildings, dry dockings and vessel modifications, on-board operations, chartering, technical supervision, corporate management, legal/regulatory, accounting and finance.

Our Business Strategy

Our principal objective is to own, operate and grow our fleet in a manner that will enable us to benefit from short- and long-term trends that we expect in the tanker sector. Our strategy to achieve this objective includes the following:

 

·

Maintain High Quality Fleet of Modern Tankers. We intend to maintain a high quality fleet that meets rigorous industry standards and our charterers’ requirements and that has an average age of six years or less. We consider our fleet to be high quality based on the specifications to which our vessels were built and the reputation of each of the shipyards that built the vessels. We believe that our customers prefer the better reliability, fewer off-hire days and greater operating efficiency of modern, high quality vessels. Our MR tankers include eco-efficient and eco- modified designed vessels which offer the benefits of lower fuel consumption and reduced emissions. We also intend to maintain the quality of our fleet through ITM’s comprehensive planned maintenance and preventive maintenance programs.

 

·

Grow the Fleet Opportunistically. We plan to take advantage of what we believe to be attractive asset values in the product tanker sector to expand our fleet through acquisitions. We believe that demand for tankers will expand as trade routes for liquid cargoes continue to evolve to developed markets, such as those in the United States and Europe, and as changes in refinery production patterns in developing countries such as China and India, as well as in the Middle East, contribute to increases in the transportation of refined petroleum products. We believe that a diversified tanker fleet will enable us to serve our customers across the major tanker trade routes and to continue to develop a global presence. We have strong relationships with reputable owners, charterers, banks and shipyards, which we believe will assist us in identifying attractive vessel acquisition opportunities. We intend to focus primarily on the acquisition of IMO II and III class vessels of eight years of age or less, which have been built in Tier 1 Asian shipyards and have modern fuel efficient designs given demands for lower bunker, or fuel, consumption and concerns about environmental emissions. We may also benefit in the future from the potential acquisition of two MR tankers owned or controlled by affiliates of Mr. Valentis, the Miss Lucy and/or the Pyxis Loucas. We will also consider acquisitions of new build vessels (that is, re-sales) and of fleets of existing vessels when such acquisitions are accretive to stockholders or provide other strategic or operating advantages to us.

 

·

Optimize the operating efficiency of our fleet.   We evaluate each of our existing and future vessels regarding their operating efficiency, and if we believe it will advance the operation of our fleet and benefit our business, we will make fuel saving and other modifications.  We will consider making such modifications when the vessels complete their charter contracts or undergo scheduled drydocking, or with new acquisitions, at the time we acquire them. Among the modifications that we monitor and may make in the future to our vessels include: fitting devices that reduce main engine fuel consumption without reducing available power and speed; fitting devices that improve fuel combustion and therefore fuel consumption for auxiliary equipment; efficient electrical power generation and usage; minimizing hull and propeller frictional losses; systems that allow for optimized routing; and systems that allow for improved maintenance, performance monitoring and management. We have evaluated and successfully installed a variety of technologies and equipment in vessels in our fleet that have resulted in operating efficiencies.  For example, we completed modifications on the Pyxis Malou and its affiliated sister ship, the Pyxis Loucas, during their fifth year special surveys that resulted in each vessel attaining an attractive return on the investment.  We will continue to build on our experience with these and other modifications and seek methods to efficiently improve the operational performance of our vessels while keeping costs competitive.

 

·

Utilize Portfolio Approach for Commercial Employment. We expect to employ the vessels in our fleet under a mix of time charters (with and without profit share), bareboat charters, pooling arrangements and on the spot market. Long-term time charters with a profit sharing component will offer us some protection in the event charter rates decrease, while allowing us to share in increased profits in the event rates increase. In addition, we expect to diversify our charters by customer and staggered duration. We believe that this portfolio approach to vessel employment is an integral part of risk management which will provide us a base of stable cash flows while enabling us to take advantage of rising charter rates and market volatility.

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·

Preserve Strong Safety Record & Commitment to Customer Service and Support. Maritime and ITM have strong histories of complying with rigorous health, safety and environmental protection standards and have excellent vessel safety records. We intend to maintain these high standards in order to provide our customers with a high level of safety, customer service and support.

 

·

Maintain Financial Flexibility. We intend to maintain financial flexibility to expand our fleet by targeting a balanced capital structure of debt and equity. As part of our risk management policies, at the time of any vessel acquisition, we expect to enter into time charters which provide us predictable cash flows for the duration of the charter and attract lower-cost bank financing at more favorable terms. We believe this will allow us to build upon our strong commercial banking relationships and optimize our ability to access the public capital markets to respond opportunistically to changes in our industry and financial market conditions.

The LookSmart Agreement and Make-Whole Right

On April 23, 2015, we and our wholly-owned subsidiary, Maritime Technologies Corp., entered into the LookSmart Agreement with LookSmart and its then wholly-owned subsidiary, LookSmart Group, Inc. (“LSG”).  On October 28, 2015, LookSmart completed its merger with and into Maritime Technologies Corp. As a condition to the consummation of the merger, LookSmart transferred all of its business, assets and liabilities to LSG, and then spun off the ownership of LSG to the LookSmart stockholders. In connection with the closing of the merger, each share of LookSmart was cancelled and exchanged for the right to receive 1.0667 shares of our common stock. Following the merger, we had a total of 18,244,671 shares of common stock issued and outstanding, after giving effect to rounding up on fractional shares.

In accordance with the terms of the LookSmart Agreement, each of LSG, its subsidiaries, and LSG’s majority shareholder, Michael Onghai, agreed to jointly and severally indemnify us and our directors, officers, stockholders and affiliates from and against any and all claims, liabilities, losses, damages, judgments, costs and/or expenses or amounts that are paid in settlement related to, among other things, (i) the breach of any representation, warranty or covenant made by LookSmart or LSG in the LookSmart Agreement or in any document delivered pursuant thereto, or (ii) the business or operations of LookSmart, LSG and their respective subsidiaries prior to the merger closing, including taxes owed for all periods and activities prior to the merger closing (collectively, the “LSG Indemnification Liabilities”).  In addition, we agreed to indemnify LookSmart and its directors, officers, stockholders and affiliates from and against any and all claims, liabilities, losses, damages, judgments, costs and/or expenses or amounts that are paid in settlement related to the breach of any representation, warranty or covenant we made in the LookSmart Agreement or in any document delivered pursuant thereto, or the business or operations of us and our subsidiaries prior to the closing of the merger.

Pursuant to the LookSmart Agreement and until October 28, 2017, none of LSG or its operating subsidiaries, shall directly or indirectly, transfer or create any encumbrance on any of their respective businesses, operations or assets, subject to certain limited exceptions, without our prior written consent. In addition, we entered into a Pledge Agreement on April 23, 2015 with LSG and Michael Onghai, pursuant to which, among other things, Michael Onghai and his affiliates pledged to us all of their shares (i) that they received from us in exchange of their LookSmart shares in connection with the merger and (ii) in LSG’s operating subsidiaries (with certain exceptions).  The pledge and the constraint on the disposition of the LSG operating business during the two-year period after closing of the merger were designed to provide collateral to support LSG’s indemnification obligations under the LookSmart Agreement.  To the extent that any LSG Indemnification Liabilities are not timely paid as set forth in the Pledge Agreement, the LookSmart Agreement provides that such LSG Indemnification Liabilities will first be paid by Michael Onghai out of the shares he received in the merger that he pledged pursuant to the Pledge Agreement, and then by each of LSG and its subsidiaries.

In accordance with the terms of the LookSmart Agreement, we granted a make-whole right to each former LookSmart stockholder who has held their LookSmart shares and the shares of our common stock they received in connection with the merger continuously since April 29, 2015 (the “Legacy LookSmart Stockholders”).  According to the make-whole right, the Legacy LookSmart Stockholders may elect to receive the value of any difference between $4.30 and the price of our shares in a future offering of at least $5.0 million (excluding any proceeds received from any shares purchased by Maritime Investors or its affiliates) completed prior to April 29, 2018.   Any Legacy LookSmart Stockholder that elects such right, would receive the value of such difference in additional shares of our common stock.  Any persons that purchased shares of Looksmart’s common stock after April 29, 2015 are not entitled to the make-whole right.  In the event that we do not conduct such an offering prior to April 29, 2018, each Legacy LookSmart Stockholder will have a 24-hour put option to require us to purchase from them a pro rate amount of our common stock that would result in aggregate proceeds to all such electing Legacy LookSmart Stockholders in an amount not to exceed $2.0 million, provided that in no event would any such Legacy LookSmart Stockholder receive more than $4.30 per share.

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Management of Ship Operations, Administration and Safety

Historically, our ship manager, Maritime, and its technical manager, ITM, have entered into individual ship management agreements with our vessel-owning subsidiaries pursuant to which they provided us with:

 

·

commercial management services, which have included obtaining employment, that is, the chartering, for our vessels and managing our relationships with charterers;

 

·

strategic management services, which include providing us with strategic guidance with respect to locating, purchasing, financing and selling vessels;

 

·

technical management services, which include managing day-to-day vessel operations, performing general vessel maintenance, ensuring regulatory and classification society compliance, supervising the maintenance and general efficiency of vessels, arranging the hire of qualified officers and crew, arranging and supervising drydocking and repairs, arranging insurance for vessels, purchasing stores, supplies, spares and new equipment for vessels, appointing supervisors and technical consultants and providing technical support; and

 

·

shoreside personnel who carry out the management functions described above. 

Ship Management Agreements with Maritime. Headquartered in Maroussi, Greece, Maritime was formed in May 2007 by our founder and chief executive officer to take advantage of opportunities in the tanker sector. Maritime’s business employs or receives consulting services from 11 people in four departments: technical, operations, chartering and finance/accounting. We entered into a Head Management Agreement with Maritime, pursuant to which Maritime provides us and our vessels, among other things, with ship management services and administrative services. Under the Head Management Agreement, each vessel owning subsidiary that owns a vessel in our fleet also has entered into a separate ship management agreement with Maritime. Maritime provides us and our vessels with the following services: commercial, sale and purchase, provisions, insurance, bunkering, operations and maintenance, dry-docking and newbuilding construction supervision. Maritime also provides administrative services such as executive, financial, accounting and other administrative services. Maritime also supervises the crewing and technical management performed by ITM for all our vessels and the chartering of the Northsea Alpha and the Northsea Beta, which is performed by NST. In return for such services, we pay to Maritime for each vessel while in operation, a fee per day of $325 (or $160 per day per vessel for any subsidiaries that contract out the chartering of the vessels to NST or others), and for each vessel under construction, a fee of $450 plus an additional daily fee, which is dependent on the seniority of the personnel, to cover the cost of the engineers employed to conduct the supervision. In addition, Maritime receives 1.0% of the purchase price of any sale and purchase transaction from the seller of the vessel, and 1.25% of all chartering, hiring and freight revenue procured by or through it. Maritime also receives a lump sum of approximately $1.6 million per annum for the administrative services it provides to us. We believe these amounts payable to Maritime are very competitive to many of our U.S. publicly listed tanker competitors, especially given our relative size. We anticipate that once our fleet reaches 15 tankers, the fee that we pay to Maritime for its ship management services for vessels in operation will recognize a volume discount in an amount to be determined by the parties at that time.

Ship Management Agreements with ITM. We outsource the day-to-day technical management of our vessels to an unaffiliated third party, ITM, which has been certified for ISO 9001:2008 and ISO 14001:2004. Each vessel owning subsidiary that owns a vessel in our fleet under a time or spot charter has entered into a ship management agreement with ITM. ITM is responsible for all technical management, including crewing, maintenance, repair, drydockings and maintaining required vetting approvals. In performing its services, ITM is responsible for operating a management system that complies, and ensure that each vessel and its crew comply, with all applicable health, safety and environmental laws and regulations. Absent a material change in the operating costs of each vessel, we pay for all expenses that are incurred in respect of each vessel, which will be presented to us in an annual budget. In addition to reimbursement of actual vessel related operating costs, we are also obligated to pay an annual fee to ITM of $155,000 per vessel (equivalent to approximately $425/day). This fee is reduced to the extent any vessel ITM manages is not fully operational for a time, that is, a period of “lay-up.”

Each ship management agreement with ITM continues by its terms until it is terminated by either party. The ship management agreements can be cancelled by us for any reason at any time upon three months’ advance notice, but neither party can cancel the agreement, other than for specified reasons, until 18 months after the initial effective date of the ship management agreement. We have the right to terminate the ship management agreement for a specific vessel upon 60 days’ notice if in our reasonable opinion ITM fails to manage the vessel in accordance with sound ship management practice. ITM can cancel the ship management agreement if it has not received payment it requests within 60 days. Each ship management agreement will be terminated if the relevant vessel is sold (other than to our affiliates), becomes a total loss, becomes a constructive, compromised or arranged total loss or is requisitioned for hire.

Commercial Ship Management Agreements with NST. We also outsource the chartering of the Northsea Alpha and the Northsea Beta to North Sea Tankers BV, an unaffiliated third party. Each of the subsidiaries owning these vessels has entered into a commercial ship management agreement with NST. In return for the chartering and related services for these vessels, we pay NST an

30


annual fee of €55,000 per vessel (equivalent to approximately €151/day) plus a commission from 1.25% to 5% calculated on the net daily charter revenue , generated within a calendar quarter, of €3,374 and above. In case these vessels do not have certain specified approvals from major oil companies in place, then the commission is set at 2.5% on gross revenue. We entered into a letter of understanding with NST on March 10, 2016, which clarified that we could continue to terminate each of our ship management agreements with NST upon three months’ advance notice, notwithstanding that NST may have nominated the vessels for contracts of affreightment entered into by NST with third parties.  On March 16, 2016, we delivered to NST notice of termination with respect to the Northsea Beta, pursuant to which we expect that Thirdone Corp.’s ship management agreement with NST will terminate in June 2016.

We are obligated to keep insurance for each of our vessels, including hull and machinery insurance and protection and indemnity insurance (including pollution risks and crew insurances), and we must ensure each vessel carries a certificate of financial responsibility as required. We are responsible to ensure that all premiums are paid. See “--Risk Management and Insurance” below.

Classification, Inspection and Maintenance

Every large, commercial seagoing vessel must be “classed” by a classification society. The classification society certifies that the vessel is “in class,” signifying that the vessel has been built and is maintained in accordance with the rules of the classification society and complies with applicable rules and regulations of the vessel’s country of registry and the international conventions of which that country is a party. In addition, where surveys are required by international conventions and corresponding laws and ordinances of a flag state, the classification society will undertake them on application or by official order, acting on behalf of the authorities concerned. The classification society also undertakes on request other surveys and checks that are required by regulations and requirements of the flag state. These surveys are subject to agreements made in each individual case and/or to the regulations of the country concerned.

For maintenance of the class, regular and extraordinary surveys of hull and machinery, including the electrical plant, and any special equipment classed are required to be performed as follows:

Annual Surveys. For seagoing vessels, annual surveys are conducted for the hull and the machinery, including the electrical plant, and where applicable, on special equipment classed at intervals of 12 months from the date of commencement of the class period indicated in the certificate.

Intermediate Surveys. Extended annual surveys are referred to as intermediate surveys and typically are conducted two and one-half years after commissioning and each class renewal. Intermediate surveys may be carried out on the occasion of the second or third annual survey.

Special (Class Renewal) Surveys. Class renewal surveys, also known as “special surveys,” are carried out on the vessel’s hull and machinery, including the electrical plant, and on any special equipment classed at the intervals indicated by the character of classification for the hull. During the special survey, the vessel is thoroughly examined, including audio-gauging to determine the thickness of the steel structures. Should the thickness be found to be less than class requirements, the classification society would prescribe steel renewals. The classification society may grant a one-year grace period for completion of the special survey. Substantial amounts of funds may have to be spent for steel renewals to pass a special survey if the vessel experiences excessive wear and tear. In lieu of the special survey every four or five years, depending on whether a grace period is granted, a ship owner has the option of arranging with the classification society for the vessel’s hull or machinery to be on a continuous survey cycle, in which every part of the vessel would be surveyed within a five-year cycle. At an owner’s discretion, the surveys required for class renewal may be split according to an agreed schedule to extend over the entire period of class. This process is referred to as continuous class renewal.

Occasional Surveys. These are inspections carried out as a result of unexpected events, for example, an accident or other circumstances requiring unscheduled attendance by the classification society for re-confirming that the vessel maintains its class, following such an unexpected event.

All areas subject to survey as defined by the classification society are required to be surveyed at least once per class period, unless shorter intervals between surveys are prescribed elsewhere. The period between two subsequent surveys of each area must not exceed five years. Most vessels are also drydocked every 30 to 36 months for inspection of the underwater parts and for repairs related to inspections. If any defects are found, the classification surveyor will issue a “recommendation” which must be rectified by the ship owner within prescribed time limits.

Most insurance underwriters make it a condition for insurance coverage that a vessel be certified as “in class” by a classification society which is a member of the International Association of Classification Societies. All of our operating vessels in our existing fleet are certified as being “in class” by Nippon Kaiji Kyokai (Class NK) and DNV GL. We expect that all vessels that we purchases will

31


be certified prior to their delivery and that we will have no obligation to take delivery of the vessel if it is not certified as “in class” on the date of closing.

Risk Management and Insurance

General

The operation of any cargo carrying ocean-going vessel embraces a wide variety of risks, including the following:

 

·

Physical damage to the vessel:

 

·

mechanical failure or damage for example by reason of the seizure of a main engine crankshaft;

 

·

physical damage to the vessel by reason of a grounding, collision or fire; and

 

·

other physical damage due to crew negligence.

 

·

Liabilities to third parties:

 

·

cargo loss or shortage incurred during the voyage;

 

·

damage to third party property, such as during a collision or berthing operation;

 

·

personal injury or death to crew and/or passengers sustained due to accident; and

 

·

environmental damage for example arising from marine disasters such as oil spills and other environmental mishaps.

 

·

Business interruption and war risk or war-like operations:

 

·

this would include business interruption, for example by reason of political disturbance, strikes or labor disputes, or physical damage to the vessel and/or crew and cargo resulting from deliberate actions, such as piracy, war-like actions between countries, terrorism and malicious acts or vandalism.

The value of such losses or damages may vary from modest sums, for example for a small cargo shortage damage claim, to catastrophic liabilities, for example arising out of a marine disaster, such as a serious oil or chemical spill, which may be virtually unlimited. While we expect to maintain the traditional range of marine and liability insurance coverage for our fleet (hull and machinery insurance, war risks insurance and protection and indemnity coverage) in amounts and to extents that we believe will be prudent to cover normal risks in our operations, we cannot insure against all risks, and it cannot be assured that all covered risks are adequately insured against. Furthermore, there can be no guarantee that any specific claim will be paid by the insurer or that it will always be possible to obtain insurance coverage at reasonable rates. Any uninsured or under-insured loss could harm our business and financial condition.

The following table sets forth information regarding the insurance coverage on our existing fleet as of December 31, 2015.

 

Type

 

Aggregate Sum Insured For All Vessels in our Existing Fleet

Hull and Machinery

 

$200.2 million.

War Risk

 

$202.0 million.

Protection and Indemnity (P&I)

 

Pollution liability claims: limited to $1.0 billion per vessel per incident.

 

Hull and Machinery Insurance and War Risk Insurance

The principal coverages for marine risks (covering loss or damage to the vessels, rather than liabilities to third parties) are hull and machinery insurance and war risk insurance. These address the risks of the actual (or constructive) total loss of a vessel and accidental damage to a vessel’s hull and machinery, for example from running aground or colliding with another vessel. These insurances provide coverage which is limited to an agreed “insured value” which, as a matter of policy, is never less than the particular vessel’s fair market value. Reimbursement of loss under such coverage is subject to policy deductibles which vary according to the vessel and the nature of the coverage.

Protection and Indemnity Insurance

P&I insurance is the principal coverage for a ship owner’s third party liabilities as they arise out of the operation of its vessel. Such liabilities include those arising, for example, from the injury or death of crew, passengers and other third parties working on or about the vessel to whom the ship owner is responsible, or from loss of or damage to cargo carried on board or any other property owned by third parties to whom the ship owner is liable. P&I coverage is traditionally (and for the most part) provided by mutual

32


insurance associations, originally established by ship owners to provide coverage for risks that were not covered by the marine policies that developed through the Lloyd’s market. 

Our P&I coverage for liabilities arising out of oil pollution is limited to $1.0 billion per vessel per incident in our existing fleet. As the P&I associations are mutual in nature, historically, there has been no limit to the value of coverage afforded. In recent years, however, because of the potentially catastrophic consequences to the membership of a P&I association having to make additional calls upon the membership for further funds to meet a catastrophic liability, the associations have introduced a formula based overall limit of coverage. Although contingency planning by the managements of the various associations has reduced the risk to as low as reasonably practicable, it nevertheless remains the case that an adverse claims experience across an association’s membership as a whole may require the members of that association to pay, in due course, unbudgeted additional funds to balance its books.

Uninsured Risks

Not all risks are insured and not all risks are insurable. The principal insurable risks which nevertheless remain uninsured across our fleet are “loss of hire” and “strikes.” We will not insure these risks because the costs are regarded as disproportionate. These insurances provide, subject to a deductible, a limited indemnity for revenue or “loss of hire” that is not receivable by the ship-owner under the policy. For example, loss of hire risk may be covered on a 14/90/90 basis, with a 14 days deductible, 90 days cover per incident and a 90-day overall limit per vessel per year. Should a vessel on time charter, where the vessel is paid a fixed hire day by day, suffer a serious mechanical breakdown, the daily hire will no longer be payable by the charterer. The purpose of the loss of hire insurance is to secure the loss of hire during such periods.

Competition

We operate in international markets that are highly competitive. As a general matter, competition is based primarily on the supply and demand of commodities and number of vessels operating at any given time. We compete for charters, in particular, on the basis of price, vessel location, size, age, condition of the vessel, acceptability of the vessel and its operator to the charterer, as well as on our reputation. We will arrange charters for our vessels typically through the use of brokers, who negotiate the terms of the charters based on market conditions. Competition arises primarily from other tanker owners, including major oil companies as well as independent tanker companies, some of which have substantially greater financial and other resources than we do. Although we believe that no single competitor has a dominant position in the markets in which we compete, the trend towards consolidation in the industry is creating an increasing number of global enterprises capable of competing in multiple markets, which will likely result in greater competition to us. Our competitors may be better positioned to devote greater resources to the development, promotion and employment of their businesses than we are. Ownership of tankers is highly fragmented and is divided among publicly listed companies, state-controlled owners and independent shipowners. Some of our publicly listed competitors include Scorpio Tankers Inc., Ardmore Shipping Corporation, Capital Product Partners L.P. and Tsakos Energy Navigation Limited.

Customers

We market our vessels and related services to a broad range of customers, including international commodity trading companies, oil and gas, and large shipping companies. During the last two years, our major customers have included, among others, Shell, Vitol, Clearlake, Trafigura, ST Shipping, Hyproc Shipping, Repsol, MTMM, Cargill and Koch Industries. In addition to these companies, we and our ship manager, Maritime, also have historical and growing chartering relationships with major oil companies, including Exxon, Shell, BP, SK Energy, Statoil, Total, Petramina, Gazprom and Petrobras.

Our top five customers accounted for approximately 68.8% and 52.6% of our revenues in 2015 and 2014, respectively. In 2015, Shell, MTMM, Vitol, Hyproc Shipping and Cargill accounted for 17.8%, 17.4%, 17.2%, 9.6% and 6.8%, of our revenues, respectively. In 2014, Vitol, Clearlake, ST Shipping, Trafigura and SIETCO accounted for 20.5%, 8.7%, 8.5%, 8.2% and 6.7% of our revenues, respectively. As of December 31, 2015, we did not have any material trade receivable outstanding from any of our customers that accounted more than 10% of the customer’s revenues during 2015. We do not believe that we are dependent on any one of our key customers. In the event of a default of a charter by any of our key customers, we could seek to re-employ the vessel in the spot or time charter markets, although the rate could be lower than the charter rate agreed with such charterer.

The International Product Tanker Shipping Industry

All the information and data contained in this section, including the analysis of the international product tanker shipping industry, has been provided by Drewry Maritime Advisors (“Drewry”), and Drewry has advised us that the statistical and graphical information contained in this section is drawn from its database and other sources. In connection therewith, Drewry has advised that: (i) certain information in its database is derived from estimates or subjective judgments, (ii) the information in the databases of other maritime data collection agencies may differ from the information in its database, and (iii) while Drewry has taken reasonable care in the compilation of the statistical and graphical information and believes it to be accurate and correct, data complication is subject to

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limited audit and validation procedures. We believe that all third-party data provided in this section, “The International Product Tanker Shipping Industry,” is reliable.

Summary

The refined petroleum products (“products”) tanker shipping industry has experienced some fundamental changes in the last decade and one result of these changes has been that seaborne trade in products and demand for product shipping capacity has grown strongly.

From 2003 to 2008 growth in trade was spurred on by rising global oil demand and by changes in the location of refinery capacity, while in recent years the shale oil revolution in the United States (U.S.) has helped to underpin the continued expansion in seaborne products trades.

Overall, seaborne trade in products grew by a compound annual growth rate (“CAGR”) of 3.9% between 2005 and 2015 from 618 to 905 million tons.  However, product tanker ton mile demand increased at a CAGR of 5.5%, because geographical shifts in the pattern of movements have led to increased trade on longer haul routes. Apart from the U.S., countries such as India have seen double digit growth in export product trades in the last decade.

Products - Seaborne Trade Index

 

Source: Drewry

Future growth in seaborne product trades will depend on a number of factors, not least of which will be prevailing trends in the global economy and in oil demand.  However, it is apparent that trade will continue to be underpinned by the emergence of the U.S. as a major exporter of products and the growth in refining capacity in countries such as India, which are heavily focused on servicing export markets.

In terms of vessel supply, products are carried in product tankers, product/chemical tankers and to a limited extent in chemical tankers.  Within the context of this report, product tankers include coated and uncoated ships with average tank sizes in excess of 3,000 cubic meters, and product/chemical tankers which are certified by the IMO to transport products and certain chemicals/edible oils, with an average tank sizes of less than 3,000 cubic meters.  Chemical tankers are all IMO certified and they normally possess multiple tanks of less than 3,000 cubic meters, which are used almost exclusively to transport bulk liquid chemicals and edible oils. They have therefore been excluded in this report.

The fleet trading in products therefore consists principally of the first two groups and between 2010 and 2014 fleet growth in these sectors was relatively subdued.  In March 2016 the product tanker and product/chemical fleets totaled 2,494 ships with a combined capacity of 136.2 million dwt.  This fleet excludes U.S. flag Jones Act vessels.

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Product tanker fleet growth in 2015 was approximately 5.0% in capacity terms and improved utilization rates in the sector have led to much stronger freight rates since late 2014 (see table below) due to a number of factors, including:

(i)

increased trade due to higher stocking activity and improved demand for products

(ii)

longer voyage distances because of refining capacity additions in Asia

(iii)

product tankers are also carrying crude oil encouraged by firm freight rates for dirty tankers

(iv)

lower bunker prices have also been a factor contributing to higher net earnings

For example, the average time charter equivalent (“TCE”) of the spot rate for a Medium Range 1 (“MR1”) product tanker in 2015 was $21,050/day, compared with an average of $12,125/day in 2014. Similarly, the average TCE of the spot rate for a Medium Range 2 (“MR2”) product tanker was $20,400/day in 2015, compared with $8,942/day in 2014.

On a one year time charter rate basis MR1 rates rose from $12,938/day in 2014 to $14,958/day in 2015 and $16,250/day in February 2016.  For MR2s the equivalent rates were $14,438/day, $17,271/day and $18,000/day, respectively.

Product Tanker One Year Time Charter Rates (US$ Per Day)

 

Source: Drewry

Encouraged by higher earnings, tanker owners have placed newbuilding orders, which have led to an increase in the ratio of the total product tanker orderbook to the existing fleet to 14.3% of dead weight tons as of March 15, 2016; although in the MR sector it was 4.4%% for MR1s and 8.7% for MR2s.  Once again, this excludes newbuilding orders for U.S. Jones Act vessels.

There is also a secondhand market for ships and product tankers to change hands between owners on a regular basis.  Secondhand prices are generally influenced by potential vessel earnings, which in turn are influenced by trends in the supply and demand for shipping capacity.

In this respect the improvement in freight rates and more positive market sentiment have had a beneficial impact on secondhand vessel values. For example, in February 2016, a five year old MR2 was valued at $27.0 million, compared with $25.0 million in the corresponding month of 2015.  However, it is worth noting that current secondhand tanker values are still below long term averages.

The Products Market

The maritime shipping industry is fundamental to international trade as it is the only pragmatic and cost effective way of transporting large volumes of many essential commodities, semi-finished and finished goods over long distances.  In turn, the product tanker shipping industry is a vital link in the global energy supply chain, given its ability to carry large quantities of products and bulk liquid chemicals as well as vegetable oils and fats between points of production and points of consumption.

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The product tanker shipping industry is highly competitive, with vessel earnings sensitive to changes in the demand for and supply of shipping capacity, and it is consequently cyclical and volatile in nature. The wider oil tanker market is divided between crude tankers that carry either crude oil or dirty products such as residual fuel oil; product tankers that carry cargoes such as gas oils and gasoline, and more sophisticated product/chemical and chemical tankers which can carry additionally chemicals and vegetable oils and fats. The basic structure of the tanker market is shown in the chart below.

 

Source: Drewry

Demand for tanker shipping is a product of the physical quantity of the cargo (measured in terms of tons) together with the distance the cargo is carried. Generally, demand cycles move in line with developments in the global economy, but other factors such as changes in sources of oil production and refinery capacity, plus movements in oil prices also play a part.

The volume of oil moved by sea was affected by economic recession in 2008/2009, but since then renewed growth in the world economy and in oil demand has had a positive impact on trade. Oil demand has benefited from strong economic growth in Asia, especially in China, where oil consumption increased by CAGR of 5.4% to 11.2 million barrels per day (“bpd”) between 2005 and 2015. Per capita oil consumption in developing countries such as China and India is low in comparison with the developed world, and this provides scope for higher oil consumption in these economies. Conversely, oil consumption in developed OECD economies has been in decline for much of the last decade, although provisional data for the U.S. and some European countries indicates that this trend was reversed in 2015.  This was almost certainly due to the positive impact of lower oil prices on demand for products such as gasoline.

In 2015, 3.2 billion tons of crude oil, products and vegetable oils/chemicals were moved by sea. Of this, crude shipments constituted 2.1 billion tons of cargo, products 0.9 billion tons, with the balance made up of other bulk liquids, including vegetable oils, chemicals and associated products.


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World Seaborne Tanker Trade

 

Source: Drewry

Tanker supply is determined by the size of the existing fleet, measured in terms of deadweight tons (“dwt”). Changes in supply are influenced by a variety of factors, including the size of the existing fleet by number and ship size; the rate of deliveries of newbuildings from the vessel orderbook, and the rate of removals from the fleet through scrapping, loss, conversion and regulatory obsolescence.  Other factors, such as port congestion and vessel speeds also affect supply.

Crude oil, products and chemicals/vegetable oils and fats are essentially carried by four different types of tanker.  Crude oil is transported in uncoated vessels, which range upwards in size from 55,000 dwt. Clean products are carried in coated tankers ranging in size from 10,000 dwt to 80,000 dwt plus. There is also a group of ships called product/chemical tankers which have the ability to carry both products and certain chemicals because they have an IMO Certificate of Fitness to Carry Bulk Liquid Chemicals.  As such they represent ‘swing’ ships, with the ability to move between the product and chemical sectors depending on market conditions.  Finally, there is a specialist chemical fleet which is all IMO rated, and which is employed primarily in transporting chemicals and vegetable oils and fats. The pure chemical fleet represents some 25% of all tankers that can carry products, but because the majority of it is trading in chemicals it is excluded from the analysis of the fleets and orderbook.

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The main types of product tanker, together with indicative vessel sizes by class, the type and average size of tanks, IMO certification and the main cargoes carried are shown in the table below. Unless otherwise specified, references in this section to “product tankers” include both non-IMO product tankers and IMO-certified product/chemical tankers.

 

Types of Product Tanker

 

Source: Drewry

Product tankers are employed in the market through a number of different chartering options:

 

·

A single or spot voyage charter involves the carriage of a specific amount and type of cargo on a load port to discharge port basis, subject to various cargo handling terms.  Most of these charters are of a single or spot voyage nature. The cost of repositioning the ship to load the next cargo falls outside the charter and is at the cost and discretion of the owner.  The owner of the vessel receives one payment derived by multiplying the tons of cargo loaded on board by the agreed upon freight rate expressed on a per cargo ton basis.  The owner is responsible for the payment of all expenses including voyage, operating and capital costs of the vessel.

 

·

A time charter involves the use of the vessel, either for a number of months or years or in less instances, for a trip between specific delivery and redelivery positions.  The charterer pays all voyage related costs.  The owner of the vessel receives monthly charter hire payments on a per day basis and is responsible for the payment of all vessel operating expenses and capital costs of the vessel.

 

·

A contract of affreightment, or COA, relates to the carriage of multiple cargoes over the same route and enables the COA holder to nominate different ships to perform individual voyages.  This arrangement constitutes a number of voyage charters to carry a specified amount of cargo during the term of the COA, which usually spans a number of years.  All of the ship’s operating, voyage and capital costs are borne by the ship owner.  The freight rate is normally agreed on a per cargo ton basis.

 

·

A bareboat charter involves the use of a vessel usually over longer periods of time ranging up to several years.  All voyage related costs, including vessel fuel, or bunkers, and port dues as well as all vessel operating expenses, such as day-to-day operations, maintenance, crewing and insurance are the responsibility of the charterer. The owner of the vessel receives monthly charter hire payments on a per day basis and is responsible only for the payment of capital costs related to the vessel.

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The basic structure of the products tanker shipping industry and certain major trading routes of product tankers are outlined in the chart below.

The Product Tanker Shipping Industry

(February 2016)

 

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Source: Drewry

Seaborne Trade in Products, Vegetable Oils and Bulk Liquid Chemicals

In 2015, total seaborne trade in products, vegetable oils and fats, and bulk liquid chemicals amounted to 1.13 billion tons.  The development in trade in these cargoes between 2005 and 2015 is shown in the table below.  Since 2005, seaborne trade in these cargoes has increased in every year with the exception of 2009.

Seaborne Trade in Products, Vegetable Oils & Fats and Bulk Liquid Chemicals

 

Source: Drewry

Products trades have received a boost in the last decade as a result of developments in the U.S. energy economy.  In the U.S. as a result of the development of shale oil deposits, domestic crude oil production increased by a CAGR of 10.6% to in excess of 9 million bpd between 2008 and 2015.

Horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing have triggered a shale oil revolution. Rising crude oil production also ensured the availability of cheaper feedstocks to local refineries, and as a result the U.S. became a major net exporter of products (see chart below).

U.S. Crude Oil Production and U.S. Refined Petroleum Product Exports

 

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Source: Drewry

In a short span of time, the U.S. has become the largest exporter of refined products in the world, with supplies from U.S. Gulf Coast terminals heading to most parts of the globe. By way of illustration, U.S. product exports to South America were close to 5 million tons in 2005, but owing to strong import demand and the growth in U.S. products availability, exports rose to in excess of 40 million tons in 2015.  Most of these exports were carried in MR product tankers which have proved to be the mainstay of export shipping capacity.  The basic structure of the U.S. products industry is shown in the chart below.

The U.S. Product Sector

 

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Source: Drewry

The shift in the location of global oil production is also being accompanied by a shift in the location of global refinery capacity and throughput.  In short, capacity and throughput are moving from the developed to the developing world and the changes that have occurred in the period 2006 to 2015 are shown in the table below. Between 2006 and 2015 total OECD refining throughput declined by 6.6%, largely as a result of cut-backs in European refining capacity.  On the other hand, throughput in the Americas in the same period was up, rising from 18.5 to 19.2 million bpd.  In 2015, OECD countries accounted for 47.1% of global refinery throughput.

Refinery Throughput (1) 2006-2015

(‘000 Barrels Per Day)

 

 

 

(1)

The difference between oil consumption and refinery throughput is accounted for by condensates, output gains; direct burning of crude oil and other non-gas liquids.

Source: Drewry

Asia (excluding China) and the Middle East added over 0.6 million bpd of export-oriented refinery capacity in 2014.  In 2015, the Middle East added a further 0.4 million bpd of new capacity and a further 0.2 million bpd came on stream in Asia.  As a result of these developments, countries such as India have become major exporters of products.

Changing Product Trades—Longer Haul Voyages

 

Source: Drewry

Upon completion of scheduled developments for 2016, approximately 0.3 million bpd of new refining capacity will be added in the Middle East and 0.5 million bpd in Asia. Further new capacity is currently scheduled for both regions in the period 2017 to 2020, but it remains to be seen if these plans will be affected by the recent collapse in oil prices.  Anticipated changes in refinery capacity on

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a regional basis in the years 2016 to 2020 aggregate to potentially 4.7 million bpd of additional capacity which are illustrated in the chart below.

Planned Additions to Global Refining Capacity (1)

 

 

 

(1)

Assumes all announced plans go ahead as scheduled; in ‘000 bpd

Source: Drewry

Chinese and Indian refinery capacity, for example, has grown at faster rates than any other global region in the last decade, due to strong domestic oil consumption, and the construction of export orientated refineries.  In the period 2005 to 2015, Chinese refining capacity increased by  97% and for India the growth was 81% (see chart below).

China & India – Refining Capacity(1)

(in ‘000 Barrels Per Day)

 

 

 

(1)

Capacity for 2016 to 2018 assumes all announced plans go ahead as scheduled

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Source: Drewry

In the product market, growth in U.S. domestic oil demand has combined with greater availability of crude feedstock (due to increased U.S. domestic crude oil production), rising refinery throughput and the expansion of pipeline infrastructure to make larger-scale product exports feasible, particularly of middle distillates from the U.S. Gulf.  Average U.S. exports of products have grown from just over 1.0 million bpd in 2005 to 2.8 million bpd in 2015.  Changes in U.S., Saudi Arabian and Indian product exports in the period 2005 to 2015 are shown in the chart below.

Oil Product Exports – Major Exporters

(Million Barrels Per Day)

 

Source: Drewry

In developed economies, such as Europe, refinery capacity is in decline and this trend is likely to continue as refinery development plans are concentrated in areas such as Asia and the Middle East at or close to oil producing centers and where the new capacity coming on stream is export orientated. These new refineries are more competitive, as they can process sour crude oil and are technically more advanced as well as more environmentally friendly compared with existing European refineries.  It is also the case that few new refineries are planned for Europe.


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Oil Product Imports – Major Regions

(Million Barrels Per Day)

 

Source: Drewry

The changes that are taking in place in seaborne product trades are of benefit to MR product tankers, the workhorses of the industry.  In addition to the mainstay trades such as gasoline movements across the Atlantic, MR vessels have the flexibility to service a diverse range of ports and the capability to accommodate the most common parcel sizes.

Product Tanker Demand

Changes in seaborne product trades and product tanker ton-mile demand in the period 2005 to 2015 are shown in the table below.

Seaborne Product Trade and Ton Mile Demand

 

 

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Source: Drewry

Tanker demand expressed in terms of ton miles can be calculated by multiplying the volume of products carried on the loaded leg (measured in metric tons) by the distance over which it is carried (measured in miles).  Using this ton mile approach, demand in the product sector increased by a CAGR of 5.5% between 2005 and 2015.  In effect, changes in the geographical pattern of product movements have led to an increase in average voyage lengths. For example, in 2005 the average loaded voyage length in the product sector was 2,736 miles, but by 2015 the average voyage length had increased to approximately 3,180 miles.

The changes that have taken place in total product tanker trade and ton mile demand between 2005 and 2015 are illustrated in the chart below. Continued growth at these historical levels is feasible but will be subject to global economic growth and a continuation of recent trade and refinery trends.

Product Tanker - Seaborne Trade and Vessel Demand

 

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Source: Drewry

Changes in the volume of seaborne trade on the main product routes in the period 2005-2015 are shown in the table below. The data in the table substantiates the previous remarks regarding the expansion of export trades from countries such as the U.S. and India.

Key Seaborne Product Trades

(‘000 Tons)

 

 

(e) partially estimated

Source: Drewry

In looking ahead growth in products trade will continue to be affected by changes in both the volume of refining capacity and where this capacity is located.  In this respect it is clear that refining capacity in developed areas of the world such as Europe is in decline, plus few new refineries are planned for this region. But in countries such as India and China, refinery capacity is growing and some of the capacity being brought on stream is designed to service export markets.  The introduction of new capacity in the Middle East and Asia to date has stimulated both an increase in overall trade volumes and geographical changes in the pattern of product trades, which have led to longer haul voyages.  As such, if the refinery expansion plans which have been announced for the developed world are implemented as scheduled, further growth in trade and product tanker demand should occur.

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Product Tankers –Vessel Types

To recap, within the context of this review the product capable fleet consists of product tankers and product/chemical tankers, and as such pure chemical tankers are excluded from the analysis. The product capable fleet can be further divided into the five main size sectors which are shown in the table below.

Product Tanker Types and Main Uses

 

Source: Drewry

Long Range (“LR”) product tankers are normally classed as either LR1 or LR2 ships depending on their size.  They are employed on various routes, but are less flexible than MR units, as many ports do not have the facilities to accommodate larger ships.

MR tankers carry the majority of products transported by sea as their size allows the greatest flexibility on trade routes and port access. The MR fleet can be divided into MR1, typically sized 25,000 dwt to 36,999 dwt and MR2 typically sized 37,000 dwt to 54,999 dwt.  The smallest product tankers, often referred to as “Handies”, are largely deployed on short haul routes.

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The Product Tanker Fleet

As of March 15, 2016 the product tanker fleet comprised of 2,494 vessels with a combined capacity of 136.2 million dwt.  The March 15, 2016 product tanker fleet by vessel type and size is shown in the table below.

The Product Tanker Fleet (1) March 15, 2016

 

 

 

(1)

Excludes U.S flag vessels

(Totals may not tally due to rounding)

Source: Drewry

Future supply will be affected by the size of the newbuilding orderbook. As of March 15, 2016, there were a total of 279 product and product/chemical tankers with a total capacity of 19.4 m dwt on order, equivalent to 14.3% of the existing fleet.  The MR1 orderbook is equivalent to 4.4% of the existing fleet and for MR2s the figure is 8.7%.


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Product Tanker Orderbook(1) and Scheduled Year of Delivery: March 15, 2016

 

 

 

(1)

Excludes U.S flag vessels

Source: Drewry

Based on the total orderbook and scheduled deliveries, approximately 8.9 million dwt is expected to be delivered in the remainder of 2016, 8.6 million dwt in 2017 and 2.0 million dwt in 2018 and beyond.  In recent years, however, the orderbook has been affected by the non-delivery of vessels (sometimes referred to as ‘‘slippage’’). Some of this slippage resulted from delays, either through mutual agreement or through shipyard problems, while some was due to vessel cancellations. Slippage is likely to remain an issue going forward and, as such, it will have a moderating effect over product tanker fleet growth in 2016/2017.

Tanker supply is also affected by vessel scrapping or demolition and the removal of vessels through loss and conversion.  As a product  tanker ages, vessel owners often conclude that it is more economical to scrap a vessel that has exhausted its useful life than to upgrade the vessel to maintain its “in-class” status. Often, particularly when tankers reach approximately 25 years of age (less in the case of larger vessels), the costs of conducting the class survey and performing required repairs become economically inefficient. In addition, in the case of product tankers there is also the current requirement to retrofit ballast water management systems to existing vessels. For a MR2 tanker the cost could be as much as $1 million including labor. Additional expenditure of this kind will be another factor impacting on the decision to scrap older vessels.  

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The age profile of the product and product/chemical fleets is shown in the table below.  

Product and Product/Chemical Fleet – Age Profile (1)

 

 

 

(1)

Based on February 2016 fleet

Source: Drewry

The age profile of the more sophisticated product/chemical fleet is generally younger than its straight product tanker counterpart.   The average age of MR1 and MR2 product tankers is 15.2 and 12.3 years, respectively, while for product/chemical tankers the average age of MR1 and MR2 tankers is 13.0 and 7.4 years, respectively.  Approximately 23% of the MR1 product tanker fleet is over 20 years of age and for MR2s the equivalent figure is 14%.In the product/chemical fleet there are no MR1 ships over 20 years of age and only 2% of MR2s are aged 20 years or more.

In addition to vessel age, scrapping activity is influenced by freight markets. During periods of high freight rates, scrapping activity will decline and the opposite will occur when freight rates are low. This is evident from the chart below which shows the trend in product tanker scrapping for period 2011-2016.

Product Tanker Scrapping

(‘000 Dwt)

 

 

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Source: Drewry

Overall, the firm tanker freight market of 2015 pushed scrapping to low levels and only 3 MR tankers were sent for demolition during 2015.

The Product Tanker Freight Market

The product tanker charter market is highly competitive. Competition is based primarily on the offered charter rate, the location and technical specification of the vessel. Similarly, the reputation of the vessel and its manager will play a major role in the product tanker market than other shipping sectors. Typically, the agreed terms are based on standard industry charter parties prepared to streamline the negotiation and documentation processes.

The major charterers of product tanker tonnage are oil companies, both private and state controlled, oil traders and refiners, and in some cases independent ship owners. The oil companies in particular have their own agreed procedures for vetting and approving tonnage suitable for charter. Oil company vetting procedures are generally more stringent than others, especially when vessels are being taken on period charter. Typically, the vetting procedures will include periodic assessments of the vessel owner’s office set-up and management, the setting of key performance indicators (“KPI”), and examination of crew retention rates and appraisal of the financial accounts of company providing the ship for charter.

Product Tanker Freight Rates

Worldscale is the tanker industry’s standard reference for calculating spot freight rates. Worldscale provides the flexibility required for the oil trade. Products are a fairly homogenous commodity as it does not vary significantly in quality and it is relatively easy to transport by a variety of methods. These attributes, combined with the volatility of the world oil markets, means that a products cargo may be bought and sold many times while at sea and therefore, the cargo owner requires great flexibility in its choice of discharge options. If tanker fixtures were priced in the same way as dry cargo fixtures, this would involve the shipowner calculating separate individual freights for a wide variety of discharge points. Worldscale provides a set of nominal rates designed to provide roughly the same daily income irrespective of discharge point.  Time charter equivalent (“TCE”) is the measurement that describes the earnings potential of any spot market voyage based on the quoted Worldscale rate. As described above, the Worldscale rate is set and can then be converted into dollars per cargo ton. A voyage calculation is then performed which removes all expenses (port costs, bunkers and commission) from the gross revenue, resulting in a net revenue which is then divided by the total voyage days, which includes the days from discharge of the prior cargo until discharge of the cargo for which the freight is paid (at sea and in port), to give a daily TCE rate.

References to time charter rates in this section include rates for “clean” cargoes that are transported primarily in product/chemical tankers and other product cargoes that are typically transported in such vessels.

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The supply and demand for product tanker capacity influences product tanker charter hire rates and vessel values.  In general, time charter rates are less volatile than spot rates as they reflect the fact that the vessel is fixed for a longer period of time.  In the spot market, rates will reflect the immediate underlying conditions in vessel supply and demand and are thus more prone to volatility.  The chart and table below illustrate changes in the monthly average TCE rates for MR product tankers in the period from January 2005 to February 2016.

Product Tanker Time Charter Equivalent (TCE) Spot Rates: 2005-2016
(US$/Day – Period Averages)

 

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Source: Drewry

Time Charter Equivalent (TCE) Spot Rates: 2005-2016 (1)
(US$/Day – Period Averages)

 

 

 

(1)

TCE rates are based on normal sailing speeds/consumption. In weak freight markets this can theoretically lead to negative rates, but in most cases this is avoided by reducing sailing speeds and fuel consumption.

Source: Drewry

After a period of favorable market conditions between 2005 and 2008, demand for products fell as the world economy went into recession in the second half of 2008 and there was a negative impact on product tanker demand. With supply at the same time increasing at a fast pace, falling utilization levels pushed tanker freight rates downwards in 2009.  A modest recovery took place in the early part of 2010, but this was short-lived and rates started to fall once more in mid-2012 and they remained weak until late 2013.

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Although the freight rates were quite volatile in 2014, they were generally strong especially in the closing months of the year. The rise in rates can be attributed to stronger vessel demand, low growth in fleet supply and more positive market sentiment. The buoyancy in freight rates continued in 2015, before moderating in the last quarter of the year.  Time charter rates started to pick up and were in line with the spot market rates. The trend in one year period average of time charter rates for period 2005- February, 2016 is shown in the chart below.

 

One Year Time Charter Rates

(US$ Per Day – Period Average)

 

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Source: Drewry

One Year Time Charter Rates

(US$ Per Day – Period Average)

 

 

Source: Drewry

Meanwhile, the use of slow steaming to reduce bunker consumption and triangulation voyage patterns helped to avoid negative earnings in most cases. Triangulation in effect reduces the amount of time a vessel will spend sailing in ballast (i.e.,empty) and seeks to maximize the amount of time it is carrying revenue generating cargo. The map below show how triangulation works for a MR tanker.

Typical MR Triangulation in the Atlantic Basin

 

Source: Drewry

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Eco Ships

Ship builders have recently designed and built ships that use less fuel while carrying the same amount of cargo as an existing ship. These vessels are referred to in the industry as “eco” ships. In addition, an eco ship has a number of technical innovations designed to reduce emissions. Such vessels are a comparatively new development, with the first designs appearing in 2012.

A newbuilding eco ship has an optimized hull form and a lower speed fuel efficient engine, which will reduce fuel consumption. Existing ships can reduce fuel consumption by lowering sailing speeds, but in practice this only happens when markets are substantially over-supplied and bunker prices are high.  Other options for existing ships to reduce fuel consumption include retrofitting equipment such as applying low friction paint, or installing Mewis ducts (which maximizes propeller thrust) and a rudder bulb or other similar features.  Eco ships started to be delivered in the second half of 2012, and in the case of tankers, most of the vessels delivered to date have been less than 100,000 dwt. Size is important in evaluating the relative benefits of eco vessels, as smaller ships spend a greater proportion of their trading year in port, where there is little economic benefit between an eco design and a conventional tanker. Shipbuilders do not provide warranted performance data for eco ships, but the experience of vessels delivered to date appears to suggest that fuel savings of approximately 15% over conventional units are achievable under normal sailings speeds.  For an MR2 product tanker, the difference in daily fuel consumption between an eco and a non-eco ship is approximately 15% tons a day, while sailing at design speeds. Based on January 2016 bunker prices this would equate to annual fuel savings in excess of $0.5 million per annum.  It also seems to be the case that the first eco ships that were delivered in 2012 are less sophisticated in design as ships delivered in 2015.

Newbuilding Prices and Secondhand Values

Vessels are constructed at shipyards of varying size and technical sophistication.  Drybulk carri